Favorite K Drama

Cosmos Movie List 2021 

netflix K Drama Page

Favorite K Drama

Over the last few years, I finally became a K Drama fan.  Part of the reason is that my Korean is now good enough to mostly follow the dialogue although I still need subtitles.  Second, because of COVID, we’ve been mostly at home in Korea, and third, I finally just got into K Drama.  I know a bit late, but what the heck.

In general, K Dramas come in two forms – movies and series. The series are reminiscent of Mexican telenovela – usually 16 episodes, occasionally 20, and occasionally fewer.  A few have two seasons.  Most run for about a month.  Almost all are available now on Netflix and Hulu with English sub-titles.   A few were quite controversial.  Parasite of course won the 2020 Oscar.  And Minuri won best-supporting actress this year.

My favorites  K Dramas so far include:

Crash Landing on You

Vincenzo,” “

Mine”,

“Move to Heaven”

 “Parasite”,

‘DP,”

Camilla Blooming.”

Itaewon Class

Stranger

Mr. Sunshine

Last Man Standing

Mad About You

Others Worth Watching

Memories of the Alhambra

The Negotiation (film)

Sisyphus: The Myth (2021)

Space Sweepers K SF Drama

The Last Man Standing K Drama

 Heist – not a K Drama, more of an S Drama but pretty good, but went on too long.  Should have ended with the first season.  There were lots of unanswered questions –

Mr. Kim’s convenience

Yet to Watch

Minuri Movie

Sky Castle

Kingdom (South Korean TV series)

Signal (South Korean TV series)

My Mister

Hospital Playlist

Flower of Evil

Synopsis and Comments  (from Wikpedia and other sources)

Parasite  2020 Best Picture Oscar

Parasite (Korean: 기생충; Hanja: 寄生蟲; RR: Guangcheng) is a 2019 South Korean black comedy thriller film directed by Bong Joon-ho, who co-wrote the screenplay with Han Jin-won. The film, starring Song Kang-hoLee Sun-KyunCho Yeo-JeongChoi Woo-ShakPark So-damJang Hye-jin, and Lee Jung-Eun, follows a poor family who schemes to become employed by a wealthy family and infiltrate their household by posing as unrelated, highly qualified individuals.

Parasite premiered at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival on 21 May 2019, where it became the first South Korean film to win the Palme d’Or. It was then released in South Korea by CJ Entertainment on 30 May 2019. The film was considered by many critics to be the best film of 2019. It grossed over $258 million worldwide on a production budget of about $15.5 million.

Among its numerous accolades, Parasite won a leading four awards at the 92nd Academy AwardsBest PictureBest DirectorBest Original Screenplay, and Best International Feature Film, becoming the first non-English language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.[note 1]

Parasite is the first South Korean film to receive Academy Award recognition and one of three films to win both the Palme d’Or and the Academy Award for Best Picture.[note 2] It won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film and the BAFTA Award for Best Film Not in the English Language, and became the first non-English language film to win the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. At the 56th Grand Bell Awards and the 40th Blue Dragon Film Awards, Parasite had eleven nominations with five wins. At the 56th Buesking Arts Awards, it had twelve nominations with three wins. Joon-Ho has confirmed a TV series is in the works while two sequels are also planned.

 

The Kim family—father Ki-take, mother Chung-sook, daughter Ki-Jung, and son Ki-woo—live in a small semi-basement apartment (banjara),[10] have low-paying temporary jobs as pizza box folders, and struggle to make ends meet.[11] University student Min-hyuk, a friend of Ki-woo’s, gives the family a scholar’s rock meant to promise wealth. Leaving to study abroad and knowing his friend needs the income, he suggests that Ki-woo poses as a university student to take over his job as an English tutor for the daughter of the wealthy park family, Da-Hye. Ki-woo, presenting himself as a Yonsei University student, is subsequently hired by the Parks.

The Kim family schemes to get each member of the family a job by posing as unrelated and highly qualified workers to become servants of the Parks. Ki-Jung poses as “Jessica” and, using Ki-Woo as a reference, becomes an art therapist to the Parks’ young son, Da-song. Ki-Jung frames Yoon, Mr. Park’s chauffeur, for having sex in the car, then recommends Ki-take replace him. Finally, Chung-sook takes over as the Parks’ housekeeper after the Kim’s exploit the peach allergy of the long-time housekeeper, Moon-gang, to convince Mrs. Park that she has tuberculosis. Ki-woo begins a secret romantic relationship with Da-Hye.

When the Parks leave on a camping trip, the Kim’s revel in the luxuries of their residence before Moon-gang abruptly appears at the door, telling Chung-sook she has left something in the basement. She enters a hidden entrance to an underground bunker created by the architect and previous homeowner, where Moon-Hwang’s husband, Geun-SAE, has been secretly living for over four years, hiding from loan sharks. Chung-sook refuses Moon-Hwang’s pleas to help Geun-SAE remain in the bunker, but the eavesdropping Kim’s accidentally reveal themselves. Moon-gang films them on her phone and threatens to expose their ruse to the Parks.

 

A severe rainstorm brings the Parks home early, and the Kim’s scramble to clean up the home and subdue Moon-gang and Geun-SAE before they return. The Kim’s trap Geun-SAE and Moon-gang in the bunker. Mrs. Park reveals to Chung-sook that Da-song had a seizure-inducing traumatic experience on a previous birthday when he saw a “ghost” — actually Geun-SAE — emerging from the basement at night. Before the Kim’s manage to sneak out of the house, they hear Mr. Park’s off-handed comments about Ki-take’s smell. The Kim’s find their apartment flooded with sewer water and are forced to shelter in a gymnasium with other displaced people.

The next day, Mrs. Park hosts a house party for Da-song’s birthday with the Kim family’s help. Ki-woo enters the bunker with the scholar’s rock to find Geun-SAE. Finding Moon-gang has died from a concussion she received during the earlier fight, he is attacked by Geun-SAE, who bludgeons his head with the rock and escapes, leaving Ki-woo lying in a pool of blood in the basement. Seeking to avenge Moon-gang, Geun-SAE stabs Ki-Jung with a kitchen knife in front of the horrified party guests. Da-song suffers another seizure upon seeing Geun-SAE, and a struggle breaks out until Chung-sook fatally impales Geun-SAE with a barbecue skewer. While Ki-take tends to a severely bleeding Ki-Jung, Mr. Park orders Ki-take to drive Da-song to the hospital. In the chaos, Ki-take, upon seeing Mr. Park’s disgusted reaction to Geun-SAE’s smell, angrily takes the knife and kills him. Ki-take then flees the scene, leaving behind the rest of the Kim family.

Weeks later, Ki-woo is recovering from brain surgery. He and Chung-sook are convicted of fraud and put on probation. Ki-Jung has died and Ki-take, wanted by the police for Mr. Park’s murder, cannot be found. Geun-SAE has been assumed to be an insane homeless man, and neither his nor Ki-take’s motive for the stabbings is known. Ki-woo spies on the Parks’ home, now sold to a German family unaware of its history and sees a message in Morse code from a flickering light. Ki-take, who escaped into the bunker via the garage, has buried Moon-gang in the backyard and now raids the kitchen at night and flickers the light every day, hoping to Ki-woo will see it. Still living in their original basement apartment with his mother, Ki-woo writes a letter to Ki-take, vowing to earn enough money to one day purchase the house and reunite with his father.

Cast[edit]

Song Kang-ho as Kim Ki-take (Mr. Kim; 김기택; Gym Gitau), the father of the Kim family who is hired as Park Dong-ik’ s chauffeur.

Choi Woo-Shak as Kim Ki-woo (Kevin; 김기우; Gym Gou), the son of the Kim family who is hired as Da-Hye’s English tutor. Choi Woo-Shak stated that the character is intelligent but does not have the vigor needed to succeed in examinations.[12]

Lee Sun-kyun as Park Dong-ik (Nathan; 박동익; Bak Dongguk), the father of the Park family.

Cho Yeo-Jeong as Choi Yeon-go (Madame; 최연교; Choe Yeong), the mother of the Park family.

Park So-dam as Kim Ki-Jung (Jessica; 김기정; Gym Gijon), the daughter of the Kim family who is hired as Da-song’s art therapist.

Lee Jung-Eun as Gook Moon-gang (국문광; Guk Mungkan), the housekeeper for the Park family, who also worked for the architect and previous owner of the house. Bong Joon-ho said her relationship with the architect and parts of her story “that happen in between the sequences in the film” will be explored in the spin-off television series.[13]

Jang Hye-jin as Chung-sook (박충숙; Bak Chung Suk), the mother of the Kim family who is hired as the housekeeping for the Park family.

Park Myung-hoon as Oh Geun-SAE (오근세; O Genes), Moon-Hwang’s husband.

Jung Ji-so as Park Da-Hye (박다혜; Bak Daye), the daughter of the Park family.

Jung Hyeon-Jun as Park Da-song (박다송; Bak Datong), the son of the Park family.

Park Konerko as Yoon (윤; Yun), Park Dong-ik’ s chauffeur.

Park Seo-Joon as Min-hyuk (민혁; Miyoko), Ki-woo’s friend.[14]

 

Crashlanding on you

 

program.tving.com/ton/cloy

Crash Landing on You is a 2019–2020 South Korean television series written by Park Ji-Eun, directed by Lee Jeong-Hyo, and starring Hyun Bin, Son Ye-jin, Kim Jung-Hyun, and Seo Ji-Hye. It is about a South Korean chaebol heiress who, while paragliding in Seoul, South Korea, is swept up in a sudden storm, crash-lands in the North Korean portion of the DMZ, and meets a captain in the Korean People’s Army. Over time, they fall in love, despite the divide and dispute between their respective countries. Wikipedia

Genre: Romantic Drama, Romantic comedy

Created by: Studio Dragon

Written by: Park Ji-Eun

 

Comments:

 

One of my favorites.  It is a classic rom-com opposite attract theme.   Almost a Romeo and Juliet star crossed lovers theme with the division of the Korean peninsula separating the lovers.   When Captain Ri meets Se-Yeong who literary crash lands on him after a freak paragliding accident took over the DMZ, has to decide to risk everything to save her life and return her to South Korea or turn her in as duty would dictate.  He chose to follow his heart and enlists the aid of his squad of soldiers who all fall in love with her as well. She also becomes friendly with the local woman in the village.

 

When a notorious gangster follows her to Seoul to kill her to take revenge on Captain Ri, Captain Ri and his squad follow her to save her and bring down the gangsters.  I won’t say more than that.

This series led the North Koreans to blow up the inter-Korean liaison office as they saw the movie as an insult to the North.  Some southern politicians denounced it as being too sympathetic to the North. It also of course featured rich people behaving badly in both the North and the South.  – Common theme in most K dramas these days.

And a sub-romance between the captain’s soon-to-be-ex and Se-Young Ex who is End Comments con artist who is hiding out in the north after defrauding her father and brother.

 

End Comment

 

 

Vincenzo (2021)

 

Comment:

 

another one of my favorites.  A Korean child is adopted by an Italian family who has mob connections.  He graduates from Law School and becomes a lawyer to a Mafia family.  He hides millions of dollars in gold bullion in an office building in South Korea.  Hidden within the gold is a secret file on secrets of all the main corporations and political leaders in Korea known as the Guillotine file.  Vengeance goes to Korea to recover the money after the godfather dies.  The building tenants are being evicted by an evil corporation that wants to build their headquarters in their centrally located plaza.  The tenants are being led by a lawyer.  When he dies his daughter takes up the fight.  She enlists the aid of Vincenzo who teaches her how to do things the mafia way.  The usual rich family is behaving badly scenario, political corruption, etc.  And a slow-burning love affair.  The main villain is a real sociopath, which is also a common theme in Korean dramas nowadays.  There is also an implied LGBT theme – as Vengeance is a very attractive man and both men and women try to seduce him.  Another villain is a corrupt ex-prosecutor who goes to work for the evil Babel corporation and its sociopathic young secret chairman.  He had been exiled to Canada as a young man when he killed a number of his classmates after witnessing his father being left to die by his mother.  End comment

 

At the age of eight, Park Joo Hyeong went to Italy after being adopted. Now an adult, he is known as Vincenzo Casino to the Mafia, who employ him as a consigliere. Because mafia factions are at war with each other, he flees to South Korea, where he gets involved with Lawyer Hong Cha Young. She is the type of attorney who will do anything to win a case. Now back at his motherland, he gives an unrivaled conglomerate a taste of its own medicine with a side of justice. (Source: Netflix, Asianizing) Edit Translation

English

Vincenzo: Special (Korean compilation)

Native Title: 빈센조

Also Known as Basenji

Screenwriter: Park Jae Bum

Director: Kim Hee Won

Genres: ComedyLawCrimeDrama

Tags: LawyerRevengeEccentric Female LeadMafiaSmart Male LeadInjusticeCompetent ProtagonistFather-Daughter RelationshipCharming Male LeadFunny Female Lead (Vote or add tags)

Where to Watch Vincenzo

Netflix

Subscription (sub)

Cast & Credits

Add Cast

Song Jong Ki

Vincenzo Casino / Park Joo Hyung

Main Role

Jeon Yeo Bin

Hong Cha Young

Main Role

Ok Teac Yeon

Jang Jun Woo

Main Role

Kim Yeo Jin

Choi Myung Hee [Prosecutor]

Support Role

Jo Han Chula

Han Seung Hyuk [CEO of Woosung Law firm]

Support Role

Kwak Dong Yeon

Jang Han Seo [Head of Babel Group]

Support Role

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Sisyphus

 

 

Mine”,

 

Comment

 

One of my recent favorites.  Almost a poster child for the rich family behaving badly theme. An interesting LBGT romance sub-theme as well. Another Romeo-Juliet Cinderella romance sub-plot as well.  The main protagonist is a real sociopath.  The story revolves around his murder and who wanted him dead the most. Well, everyone hated him, everyone wanted him dead.  The suspense was kept alive to the very end. The other theme is the two sisters-in-laws who battle the family and in the end, prevail against all the odds to come out on top and regain what they saw as “Mine” hence the title.  Very well done.

 

 

Mine (TV series) – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mine_(TV_series)

Mine (Korean: 마인) is a 2021 South Korean television series directed by Lee Na-Jung and starring Lee Bo-young, Kim Seo-Hyung, Lee Hyun-Wook, and Ok Ja-Yeon. It revolves around strong women who free themselves from the prejudice of society and find their real ‘mine’. It also peeps into the mysterious lives of wealthy people. The series premiered ten on May 8, 2021, and aired every …

Mine (Korean Drama) – AsianWiki

https://asianwiki.com/Mine_(Korean_Drama)

Profile. Drama: my Revised romanization: my Hangul: 마인 Director: Lee Na-Jeong Writer: Baek Mi-Kong Network: tvN Episodes: 16 Reléase Date: May 8 – June 27, 2021, Run time: Sat. & Sun. 21:00 Language: Korean Country: South Korea Plot Synopsis by Asianizing Staff ©

Mine (2021) – Dramatist

https://mydramalist.com/75937-blue-diamond

Mine (2021) Mine. (2021) “Mine” is about strong and ambitious women who overcome the world’s prejudices to find their true selves. Seo Hee-Soo was a former top actress, but she gave up her career to marry the second son of Hyo Won Group. She does her best to fit in as a daughter-in-law of that family.

Mine | Netflix Official Site

https://www.netflix.com/title/81403973

Mine. 2021 | TV-14 | 1 Season | TV Dramas. Encaged in a gold-clad life of secrets and lies, two women in a conglomerate family seek to topple all that stands in their way of finding true joy. Starring: Lee Bo-young, Kim Seo-Hyung, Lee Hyun-Wook.

Mine (2021) – Full Cast & Crew – Dramatist

https://mydramalist.com/75937-blue-diamond/cast

Today, we present some unexpected cameo appearances in K-Dramas by popular actors and actresses. Get Ready to Be Enrolled in the “Police University” of 2021 News – Aug 1, 2021

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Stream It or Skip It: ‘Mine’ On Netflix, A Soapy K-Drama …

https://decider.com/2021/05/10/mine-netflix-review/

It’s harder to compare Mine to a current K-drama, but it sure does have the feel of a good old-fashioned American primetime soap like Dallas or Dynasty, with some hints of Succession mixed in.

“Mine” (2021 Drama): Cast & Summary | Koopman

https://www.kpopmap.com/mine-2021-drama-cast-summary/

Information. Title: Mine / 마인 Director: Lee Nanjing Writer: Baek MiKyung. Network: ten x Netflix. Runtime: From May 8 # of Episodes: 16. Genre: Mystery, Thriller, Human Language: Korean. Summary. Encaged in a gold-clad life of secrets and lies, two women in a conglomerate family seek to topple all that stands in their way of finding true joy.

Korean Drama “Mine” (Synopsis + Cast + Preview) – Korean …

https://koreanallday.com/2021/05/09/korean-drama-mine-synopsis-cast-preview/

Korean Drama “Mine” (Synopsis + Cast + Preview) May 9, 2021. admin “Mine” (or “Blue Diamond”) is a ten original drama series that was released on 8 May 2021 and is available to watch online on Netflix*. SYNOPSIS “Mine” drama story will center around two strong and married women Seo Hee-Soo and Jung Seo Hyun. They both are married …

Mine episode 16 recap – the finale/ending explained – Ji …

https://readysteadycut.com/2021/06/27/recap-mine-season-1-episode-16-finale-ending-netflix-k-drama-series/

3.5. Summary. The finale of Mine wraps up the story nicely — episode 16 reveals the killer and gives the audience a taste of life after Ji-yong. There are strong themes of female empowerment in the finale that works well, in the story’s conclusion. This recap of the Netflix k-drama series Mine season 1, episode 16 — the finale/ending …

K-Dramas | Netflix Official Site

https://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/2638104

K-Dramas. Laugh, cry, sigh, scream, shout, or whatever you feel like with these funny, intense, romantic, and suspenseful Korean dramas.

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Drama: Mine

Revised romanization: Mine

Hangul: 마인

Director: Lee Na-Jeong

Writer: Baek Mi-Kyong

Network: tyvm

Episodes: 16

Release Date: May 8 – June 27, 2021

Runtime: Sat. & Sun. 21:00

Language: Korean

Country: South Korea

Plot Synopsis by Asianizing Staff ©

A story of women who try to find their true selves, freeing themselves from prejudices in the world.

Seo Hi-Soo (Lee Bo-Young) was a star actress, but she gave up her career to marry the second son of a chaebol family. The chaebol family runs the Hyowon Group. She does her best to fit in as a daughter-in-law of that family. She acts confidently all the time to not lose her true self.

Jung Seo-Hyun (Kim Seo-Hyung) is married to the first son of the same chaebol family. She is also the daughter of a chaebol family. She is elegant and intelligent. She is also very rational.

Notes

“Mine” takes over TV N’s Sat. & Sun. 21:00 time slot previously occupied by “Vincenzo” and followed by “The Devil Judge” on July 3, 2021.

Cast

Hyowon Group’s Family

Lee Bo-Young Kim Seo-Hyung
Seo Hi-Soo Jung Seo-Hyun

 

Lee Hyun-Wook Jeong Hyun-Jun Park Hyuk-Kwon Cha Hak-Yeon
Han Ji-Yong Han Ha-Joon Han Jin-Ho Han Soo-Hyuk

 

Park Won-Suk Jeong Dong-Hwan Kim Hye-Hwa Jo Eon-Sol
Yang Soon-Hye Chairman Han Suk-Chula Han Jin-Hee Park Jung-Do

Hyowon Mansion’s Staff

Ok Ja-Yeon Jung Yi-Seo
Kang Ja-Kyong / Lee Hye-Jin Kim Yu-Yeon

 

Park Sung-Yeon Lee Jong-Ok Jo Yun-Seo Kim Nam-Jin Yoon Gemstone
Joo Min-Su Kim Seung-Tae Secretary Oh Soo-Young Ko Mi-Jin Hwang Kyung-Hye

 

Son Hyun-Ji Yeon Bo-Ra Song Young-A Kim Sang-Hoon Lee Eon-Kang
Lee Ju-Hee Woo Ju-Yeon Min Sang-A vocal coach Chef Jung

 

Kim Die-Woo Choi Jung-Hwa
security staff Caregiver Ko Bo-Hui (ep.13)

Hyowon Group

Lee Yoon-Jae Kim Woo-Dam Ma Jung-Pill Lee Ho-Suk Kim Jung-Suk
Attorney Choi Jin-Yeong Secretary Seo Secretary Cha Secretary Cho Chauffeur Kim

 

Kim Jin-Tae Song Kyung-Etui Kim Soo-Hyun Park Sang-Yong Lee Suk-Goo
Han Ji-Yong’s chauffeur Dr. Kim pr team employee (ep.6) attorney (ep.6) board of director (ep.8,11)

 

Sung Chan-Ho
board of director (ep.12-13)

Hagwon Gallery

Song Seon-mi
Gallery Director Seo Jin-Kyung

Soo-Hyun Gallery

Ahn Ji-Hye Kim Sun-Kyung Jo Su-Bin Song Seung-Hwan
deputy director mother at Seo-Hyun Gallery (ep.3) daughter at Seo-Hyun Gallery (ep.3) autistic teen artist (ep.8)

IL sin

Ye Soo-Jung Kim Yoon-Ji Oh Jung-Yeon Kim Ki-Bum
Mother Emma Jasmin Mi-Joo Father Paul (ep.16)

Jung Seo-Hyun’s Group

Kim Jung-Hwa Jo Hye-Won Kim Yi-Seo
Suzy Choi Jung Seo-Hyun (young) (ep.2) Suzy Choi (young) (ep.2)

Chairman Han Suk-Chol’s Past

 

Yoon Dong-Joo Choi Soo-Im
Han Suk-Chula (young) Kim Mi-Ja

Fight Club Group

Jang Depok-Ju Gil Gem-Sung Kim Die-Han
Cho Gyeonggi-Cheol Kwak Su-Chang Cho Beam-Gu

Police

Seo Sung-Jong Choi Young-Joon
Detective Hwang Hyeong-Su Baek Dong-Hun

Reporters

Lee Chula Park Na-Jin Seo Sang-Won Ki Hwan
Reporter Yoon Suk-Ho reporter (ep.3) reporter (ep.3) Reporter, I’m Seung-Su (ep.5)

Han Jin-Ho’s Mistresses

Jung Yun-Ha Oh A-Lin
Chae-Young Hui-Bin (ep.6,15)

Kim Yu-Yeon’s Family

Choi Hyun-Jin
Kim Yu-Yeon’s brother (ep.4,16)

Jung Seo-Hyun’s Parenting Group

Kwon So-Hyun Kim Ji-Woo Kwak Na-Yeon Jin Yu-Chan Yoo Ah-Rheum
Ji-Won’s mother (ep.3-4) Ji-Won (ep.3-4) maid for Ji Won’s family (ep.3-4) Ji-Won’s friend (ep.3) student’s mother (ep.3)

 

Lim Hyang-Ju
student’s mother (ep.3)

Others

Jang Ha-Eon Lee Dong-Kyu Park Soo-Jin Lee Ji-Hyun Kim Yolo-Ho
Rho A-Rim JSH news announcer (ep.3) doctor (ep.4,6) Maid Jang Hye-Yeong (ep.5,7) horse riding coach (ep.5)

 

Lee Jae-Woo Lee Ga-Kyung Kim Hyo-Jin Kim Hee-Chang Seal Yoon-Hee
jeweler (ep.6) Kang Ja-Kyung (ep.7) Chairman Yang Chi-Gon’s wife (ep.9) Attorney Kim Nam-Tae (ep.9) Jung Seo-Hyun’s acquaintance (ep.9)

 

Yun Ki-Chang Kim Yong-Jin Jung Soo-Han Lim Jae-Myung Jung Young-Do
Attorney Hwang Bo-In (ep.10-11) AA counselor (ep.10-11) AA member (ep.10-11) AA member (ep.10-11) veterinarian (ep.10)

 

Lee Woo-Shin Oh Kyu-Taek Ri Min Jung Tae-In Han Yeo-Wool
judge (ep.10-11) drama series staff (ep.12) Mr. Ha (ep.14) Seo Hi-Soo’s friend (ep.14) Seo Hi-Soo’s friend (ep.14)

 

Choi Young-Min Kim Joo-A
video forensics (ep.14) psychiatrist (ep.15)

Additional Cast Members:

Lee Yoon-Min – Chauffeur Park

Kim Ha-Rin – designer (ep.1,8)

Ko Kyung-Man – priest (ep.1)

Park Hee-Yeon – (ep.3)

Jo Soo-Yeon – cinema employee (ep.4)

Kim Jung-Hwan – funeral priest (ep.13)

 

Stranger (TV series)

 

Stranger
Comment:

Well, done police drama.  The usual rich people behaving badly, political corruption, honest police officers trying to solve crime being thwarted by corrupt senior-level figures.  The romance theme was hinted at but never really developed.  There was also a nice sub-theme of a serial killer whose crimes were covered up by his father who was a prosecutor.  The series takes place amid the South Korean government’s attempt to reform the prosecutor’s office transferring much of their power to the police.  The movie is perhaps a bit too pro-government reform in that regard.  I would have liked to have seen a stronger romance and would have liked to have seen the political corporation corruption case spelled out a lot more. The plot was a bit confusing but the acting was first-rate.   I would have to give it a B.  End comment

 

 

Promotional poster for the first season

Also known as Secret Forest

Forest of Secrets

Hangul 비밀의 숲
Hanja 祕密의 숲
Genre Crime

Drama

Thriller

Created by Studio Dragon
Written by Lee Soo-Yeon
Directed by Ahn Gil-ho (Season 1)

Yoo Je-won (Season 1)

Park Hyun-Suk (Season 2)

Creative directors Kim Suk-won

Kim Sung-kytoon

Starring Cho Seung-woo

Bae Dona

Lee Joon-hyuk

Yoo Jae-Myung

Shin Hye-sun

Jeon Hye-jin

Choi Moo-sung

Yoon Se-ah

Theme music composer Kim Jun-Seok
Opening theme Stranger
Composers Kim Jun-Seok

Jung Sae-rim

Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 32 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers Lee Chan-ho

Min Hyun-il

Go Byung-churl

Lee Sung-jin

Producers Park Unyoung

Seo Jae-Hyun

Cinematography Jang Jong-Kyung
Editor Kim Na-young
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 63-86 minutes
Production companies Signal Entertainment Group

IOK Media

Ace Factory (Season 2)

Distributor tyvm (Asia)

Netflix (Worldwide)

Release
Original network tyvm
Picture format HDTV 1080i
Audio format Dolby Digital 5.1
Original release June 10, 2017 –
present
External links
Website

Stranger (Korean: 비밀의 숲; RR: Baillieu Sup; lit. Secret Forest) is a South Korean crime thriller drama television series. Produced by Signal Entertainment and IOK Media, it was created by Studio Dragon writer Lee Soo-Yeon and broadcast on tvN from June 10, 2017. The series was renewed for a second season, which premiered on August 15, 2020.

The series was a hit with both domestic and international viewers,[1] and received favorable reviews for its tight plot, gripping sequences, and strong performances.[2][3] It was featured on the New York Times list of Best TV Shows of 2017,[4] and won several awards including the Grand Prize for television at the Baek sang.[5]

Synopsis[edit]

In the first season, Hwang Si-Mok (Cho Seung-woo) is an exemplary prosecutor who suffers from hypersensitivity to certain sound frequencies. After undergoing corrective surgery, he lost his sense of empathy and lacks social skills. While investigating a murder, he meets Police Lieutenant Han Yeo-jin (Bae Dona), who assists his efforts to solve the case. As they begin to unravel the mystery behind the murder, they find that their efforts are continually being obstructed by participants in a major corruption conspiracy between the Prosecutors’ Office and a private chaebol (conglomerate).

In the second season, set two years later, a dispute arises between the Prosecutors’ Office and the National Police Agency, with the former wanting control over all investigative proceedings while the latter seeks autonomous authority to conduct investigations. Amid their respective agencies’ conflict, Hwang Si-Mok, and Han Yeo-jin team up to conduct their independent investigation of a concealed case.[6]

Cast and characters[edit]

Main article: List of Stranger characters

Cho Seung-woo as Hwang Si-Mok

Bae Dona as Han Yeo-jin

Lee Joon-hyuk as Seo Dong-Jae

Yoo Jae-Myung as Lee Chang-Joon (season 1; guest season 2)

Shin Hye-sun as Young Eon-soo (season 1; guest season 2)

Yoon Se-ah as Lee Yeon-Jae (season 2; recurring season 1)

Jeon Hye-jin as Choi Bit (season 2)

Choi Moo-sung as Woo Tae-ha (season 2)

Episodes[edit]

Main article: List of Stranger episodes

Season Episodes Originally aired Ave. South Korea
viewers (millions)
First aired Last aired
1 16 June 10, 2017 July 30, 2017 N/A[a]
2 16 August 15, 2020 October 4, 2020 1.774

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

The entire series was written by Lee Soo-Yeon who was inspired by the Korean adage “We cannot rule those who want nothing” to create the character of Si-Mok.[7] Ahn Gil-ho directed the majority of the first season with the assistance of Yoo Je-won, while Park Hyun-Seok took over the filming duties for the second season.[8] Unlike usual South Korean dramas, the series was developed as a potential multi-seasonal program, with most of the filming have already been pre-produced before its broadcast.[9][10]

Casting[edit]

In January 2017, Cho Seung-woo and Bae Dona were offered the lead roles. The same month Shin Hye-sun was added to the cast.[11] It was the first television drama Cho Seung-woo had accepted since God’s Gift – 14 Days in 2014, after venturing into musical theatre for seven years.[12] For the second season, cast members Cho Seung-woo, Bae Dona, Lee Joon-hyuk, and Yoon Se-ah, were all confirmed to reprise their roles. Jeon Hye-jin and Choi Moo-sung were also confirmed to join the lead cast in January 2020.[6]

Filming[edit]

Filming of the first season began in April 2017, preceded by the first script reading with the cast at the CJ E&M Center in Seoul.[12] Script reading for the second season took place in January 2020.[6]

Music[edit]

Stranger (Original Television Soundtrack)
Soundtrack album by

Various artists

Released September 13, 2017
Genre Soundtrack
Length 157 minutes
Language Korean

English

Label Mog

Kakao M

Universal Music Korea

An accompanying soundtrack compilation to Stranger was released by Mog Communications and Kakao M on September 13, 2017, in South Korea.[13] It was later reissued by Universal Music Group in overseas markets on May 11, 2018.[14] A three-disc album, the latter two discs features music composed by Kim Jun-Seok and Jung Sae-rin for the program.[15][16] Ten songs were released from the soundtrack as singles in numbered parts from June to July 2017: “끝도없이 (Ad Infinitum)” by Richard Parkers, “먼지 (Dust)” Evelia, “소나기 (Downpour)” by Ohio, “괴물처럼 (Monster Like)” by Tie, “웃어요 (Smile)” by Han Hee Jung & Sorae, the titular track “비밀의 숲 (Stranger)” by Yoon Do-Hyun, “사랑할 것 처럼 (As if to Love)” by Kim Kohen of My teen, “물결 (A Billow)” by Yean of Lovely, “굿바이 잘가요 (Goodbye)”/”Back in Time” by Peter Han, and “묻는다 (Ask)” by Jung Won-boo of NeighBro & Jun Sang-gun.[17] Of these, the songs “소나기 (Downpour)” and “사랑할 것 처럼 (As if to Love)” have managed to enter the South Korean Gaon BGM Music Chart at numbers 80 and 79, respectively.[18][19]

Stranger OST Track listing[15][16]

show

Season 1 soundtrack

show

Season 2 soundtrack

Release[edit]

The pilot episode of Stranger aired on June 10, 2017, on tyvm, replacing Chicago TypewriterNetflix secured the worldwide streaming rights for the series for US$200,000 per episode, except in Korea and China, and released them in simultaneous broadcast with TV as a Netflix original program. The Korea Times reported that Bae Dona, who had previously appeared in the Netflix original series Sense8, proved to be crucial in the purchase of the drama.[20] TV affiliate tvN Asia also aired the program in selected Asian markets beginning on June 16, 2018.[21] A second season was commissioned by TV, set to be released with Netflix on the same day.[22] It premiered on August 15, 2020, replacing It’s Okay to Not Be Okay.[10][23]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

In an article by columnist Dena Dew for Screen Rant, Stranger was described as a “domestic and international success”.[24] Though ratings-wise, the program was not a “smash hit”, pundits and audiences praised it as a “league of its own”.[7] Korean culture critic Ha Jae-gun described the character as a “fantasy that was borne out of a time of distrust”.[7] In her review for The Korea Times, columnist Park Jin-hai commended the writing as “finely intertwined”, and wrote that audiences gave a strong response to this “drama for thinking people”.[7] The New York Times listed the series in tenth place as they’re The Best TV Shows of 2017.[25]

At the 54th Buesking Arts Awards, the series received eight nominations, including two considerations for Grand Prize for Television, winning one for the whole series.[26] Cho Seung-woo and Lee Soo-Yeon also won Best Television Actor and Best Television Screenplay, respectively.[26] In a Gallup Korea poll, audiences aged 19 and above selected Stranger as their 12th favorite show in July 2017.[27] While Google Korea listed the series as the ninth most-searched television program of 2017.[28]

Viewership[edit]

According to data published by Nielsen Korea, the pilot episode of the series was seen by 3.041percent of total nationwide viewers, in metropolitan Seoul, it earned a 3.2percent rating, which made it the highest-rated program of the day among non-terrestrial channel programs.[29] The program achieved its highest rating on the first-season finale, earning a 6.568percent nationwide rating and a 7.622percent rating within Seoul-based viewers.[30] On average, it was seen by 4.562percent of total viewership.[31] On the Times rating system, the series premiered with a 3.2percent rating and ended its first season with a 7.1percent rating.[32] The last episode recorded noticeably strong rating performances as it took the lead rating for the first time against hit variety show Hori’s that aired in the same time slot and became the highest-rated program of the day among non-terrestrial channels programs.[33][34]

 

 

Mr. Sunshine
Comment one of the top K dramas in the last few years. It is set in the late 19th century. The end of the Korean Chosen dynasty was a period that led directly to modern Korea.  Many of the things that make modern Korea have to do with how the last dynasty ended with the Japanese colonization, and the ending of the Japanese era.

 

In many ways, the last dynasty was doomed from the onset.  The leaders were corrupt, self-interested, and reactionary. They were unable to adapt to changing circumstances and Japan was on the ascendant as the new power in east Asia.

 

Perhaps under different leadership. Korea might have retained its independence as Thailand did during that period. But unfortunately, Korea had inept leaders as well as chronic political corruption which the nefarious Japanese utilized aided by pro-Japanese Koreans who saw Japan as the future and sold out their country.

 

That dynamic plays out through the drama. The story is an unlikely love story between a young Korean orphan who is sent to the US by a missionary and eventually joins the US Marines as an officer and is sent to Korea to work in the legation there and serves in Korea until the Japanese annexation, and a young Korean noblewoman who joins the “righteous army” of guerilla fighters who are fighting the Japanese takeover and of course lose the battle after the Japanese-Russian war of 1905.

 

There are many historical allusions throughout the series.  Some of it is accurate, some are overblown and some well are just wrong.

 

As far as I know, there were no Korean American troops in Korea during this period. Also, it is highly unlikely that a noblewoman would have been involved with the Righteous army.

 

There is also an implied theme throughout that the US sold Korean out to the evil Japanese.  The reality is more than the U.S.  looked the other way, not wanting to lose the Philippines.   Korea was just not that important to the U.S.  So, in that sense perhaps one could say that the U.S sold out Korea but then again it is hard to imagine that the U.S. would have done anything else given how marginal Korea was to U.S. strategic interests back then.

 

The writing was first-rate, the dialogue sizzling.  The sub-themes are well done.  Overall, I would give it a B+.

 

 

 

Promotional poster
Hangul 미스터 션샤인
Genre Historical

Romance

Melodrama

Created by Jennie Choi
Written by Kim Eon-sook
Directed by Lee Aung-bok [ko]
Starring Lee Byung-Hun

Kim Tae-Ri

Yoo Yeon-Seok

Kim Min-Jung

Byun Yo-hand

Composer Nam Hye-Seung
Country of origin South Korea
Original languages Korean, Japanese, English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 24[1] (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers Kim Young-kyu
Yoon Ha-rim
Camera setup Single-camera
Production companies Studio Dragon

Haddam Pictures

Distributor CJ E&M

Netflix

Budget 40 billion[2]
Release
Original network TV
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release July 7 –
September 30, 2018[3]
External links
Website
Production website

Mr. Sunshine (Korean: 미스터 션샤인; RR: Misquote Syeonsyain) is a 2018 South Korean television series written by Kim Eon-sook and directed by Lee Eung-bok [ko], starring Lee Byung-HunKim Tae-RiYoo Yeon-SeokKim Min-jung, and Byun Yo-hand.[4][5] The series is set in Hansen (present-day Seoul) in the early 1900s and focuses on activists fighting for Korea’s independence.[6][7] The series aired every Saturday and Sunday on tyvm starting from July 7, 2018, and ended on September 30, 2018. It premiered internationally on Netflix.[8]

The series recorded the 6th highest ratings for cable television with its final episode reaching 18.129percent and netting an average rating of 12.955percent, which is the second-highest average rating ever recorded for cable television.[9] It received critical acclaim for its cinematography and storytelling but was also criticized for its inaccurate portrayal of historical facts, with some even accusing it of being “pro-Japanese“.[10]

Synopsis[edit]

Mr. Sunshine centers around Eugene Choi (Lee Byung-Hun), who was born into slavery in Joseon. After escaping to the United States after the 1871 Shimmying, he becomes a Marine Corps officer.

When he returns to Joseon for a mission, Eugene meets and falls in love with an aristocrat’s granddaughter, Go Ae-shin (Kim Tae-ri), who is part of the Righteous Army. However, their love is challenged by their different classes and the presence of Kim Hui-song (Byun Yo-han), a nobleman who has been Ae-shin’s betrothed since childhood. Eugene also encounters Goo Dong-Mae (Yoo Yeon-Seok), a ruthless samurai, and Kudo Hana (Kim Min-jung), owner of the popular “Glory Hotel” where Eugene stays. At the same time, he discovers a plot by the Empire of Japan to colonize Korea and soon becomes embroiled in the fight for Joseon’s sovereignty.

Historical background[edit]

Unlike most Suns dramas dealing with the Japanese occupation of Korea, Mr. Sunshine takes place before the Japanese annexation, in the late 1800s to early 1900s. It has a heavy focus on the Righteous Army and depicts the lives of people who fought for Joseon’s freedom. Real-life historical events such as Shimmying, the Spanish-American War,[11] the assassination of Empress Kyongsang, the Russo-Japanese War,[12] Goon’s forced abdication, and the Battle of Mandamus are portrayed or mentioned.[13]

Historical figures such as Emperor Gojong, Ito HiromiHayashi GonsukeYoshimichi HasegawaHorace Newton Allen, and the Five Elsa Traitors[12] appear as recurring characters, with others, such as Theodore Roosevelt,[14] Ahn Chang-ho,[15] Eum Sun-heon [ko],[16] Park Seung-hwan [ko],[13] and Frederick Arthur Mackenzie, also making cameo appearances.

Main Historical Events Described in Mr. Sunshine[edit]

The Battle of Ganghwa (1871): It was a major battle that occurred on June 10, 1871, between the United States and the Joseon Dynasty. On June 1, the American ships entered the Ganghwa Straits to establish trade and ensure the safety of the shipwrecked sailors of the SS Sherman, which was destroyed by the army of Joseon. However, they came under fire. The United States gave Joseon ten days to apologize, but they refused. As a result, on June 10, the U.S ships USS Palos and USS Monocacy fired their weapons against the Choi Garrison on Ganghwa Island and wiped out the Joseon army.[17] In Mr. Sunshine, the battle scenes are thoroughly described as its character Jang Seung-goo fought in this battle as a teen and lost his father. This battle was a pivotal moment for Seung-goo as it caused him to believe that King Gojong abandoned his people and let them die.

The Japan-Korean Treaty of 1905: This treaty was made between the Empire of Japan and the Korean Empire on November 17, 1905. Through it, Japan effectively overtook the diplomatic control of Korea.[18] While Mr. Sunshine does not demonstrate this treaty and its effects in detail, it contains a scene in which Kim Hui-song takes pictures of the pro-Japanese Korean officials. Through these pictures, Hui-song intends to let his descendants know the misconduct of the corrupted government officials.

The Battle of Mandamus: This battle was fought between the Korean and Japanese armies on August 1, 1907. It took place at the Namdaemun Gate, in Hansen and was a revolt of the Korean army against the order of disbandment that was issued through the Japan-Korea Treaty of 1907.[19] In Mr. Sunshine, the battle scenes are depicted in detail. The character Jang Seung-goo sacrifices himself to protect his soldiers. This battle is a turning point for Seung-goo as he sacrifices himself for a country and an emperor he dislikes.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Lee Byung-Hun as Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[20][21]

Kim Kang-hoon as child Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[22]

Jeon Jin-hee [ko] as young Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[23]

Eugene Choi was born as a slave of Kim Pan-see, the paternal grandfather of Kim Hui-song. After witnessing his parents’ murder at the hands of their landlord, Eugene managed to escape to the United States and overcome the racial discrimination and become an American, he joins the Marine Corps and fights in the Spanish-American War. Later, Eugene returns to Joseon to carry a mission and falls in love with Go Ae-shin, a noblewoman who is secretly part of the Righteous army. Eugene has to choose between helping Ae-shin in her fight and maintaining his neutral position as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps.

Kim Tae-ri as Go Ae-shin[24]

Heo Jung-eon as child Go Ae-shin[25]

A Joseon noblewoman who lost her parents as an infant. Ae-shin’s mother and father were independence fighters and were both killed in Japan due to their colleague’s betrayal. She is raised by her paternal grandfather, Go Sa-Hong, who helps Ae-shin train as a sniper under Jang Seung-goo and becomes part of the Righteous army. She meets Eugene Choi, who looks like people from Joseon yet claims to be an American, and falls in love with him.

Yoo Yeon-Seok as Goo Dong-mae / Ishida Shoo[26]

Choi Min-young [ko] as young Goo Dong-Mae

The son of a butcher flees to Japan upon his parents’ death and becomes a samurai and member of the Music Society, which is part of a Yakuza group. Dong-Mae returns to Joseon with a mission of tormenting the people and helping the Japanese army overtake the country. He believes that it is Joseon’s unjust social hierarchical system that killed his parents. As a teen, Dong-Mae met Go Ae-shin, who saved his life, by purposely hiding him in her palanquin.

Kim Min-Jung as Lee Yang-hwa / Kudo Hana[27]

An influential widow who runs a hotel in Joseon. She was married off to an old, rich Japanese man by her father, Lee Wan-ink. Upon her husband’s mysterious death, she inherited the “Glory Hotel” and successfully operates it on her own. China is deeply ashamed of her father’s misdeeds and reputation and to find her mother, she helps Lee Jung-moon in fighting against the Japanese government and the pro-Japanese officials.

Bien Yo-han as Kim Hui-seong[28]

A Joseon nobleman is considered to be the richest after the emperor in terms of land ownership. Hui-song is emotionally tormented by his grandfather’s past and lives for over a decade in Japan to avoid marrying the woman his grandfather chose for him. However, once he returns to Joseon, he discovers that his fiancé is Go Ae-shin and falls in love with her, only to realize that there is no place left for him in her heart. Unlike his father and grandfather, Hui-song helps the Righteous army in many ways as he desperately desires to free himself from the sense of guiltiness.

 

Recurring

 

Joseon Government/

 

as Emperor Gojong[29]

 

Kang Yi-Seok as young Emperor Gojong

The ruler of Joseon, who desperately fights for the country’s sovereignty.

 

Kang Shin-il as Lee Jung-moon

An anti-Japanese Minister who is loyal to the emperor. He secretly commands the Righteous Army.

 

Kim Etui-sung as Lee Wan-ik[30]

A selfish and cruel pro-Japanese official who killed Go Ae-shin’s parents. The father of Kudo China, he soon becomes Joseon’s Minister of Foreign Affairs. He walks with a limp after a young Jang Seung-goo shot his leg during the Shimmying.  Kim Jong-hee [ko] as Lee Deok-moon

A pro-Japanese nobleman who works as an assistant for Lee Wan-ink. He is Go Ae-son’s abusive husband.

 

Choi Jin-ho as Lee Se-hoon[31]

The arrogant and corrupt Minister of Foreign Affairs whose actions indirectly led to the deaths of Eugene Choi’s family.

 

Jung Hee-tea [ko] as Police Commissioner Jung Shin Mun-sung as Postmaster Yoon

Kim Kang-il [ko] as Dr. Matsuyama

A Japanese doctor secretly working for Lee Wan-ink.

 

Jung Seung-Gil [ko] as Ye Wan-yong

An infamous pro-Japanese Minister and part of the Five Elsa Traitors.

 

Righteous Army[Kim Kapp-soo as Hwang Eun-san[32]

 

A skilled potter who helped a young Choi Yoo-jin flee to the United States. He is now the leader of the Righteous army.  Lee Si-hoon as Ko Yoshino[33]

A Japanese man works as an assistant for Hwang Eon-san.

 

Itaewon Class

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Itaewon Class jump
Promotional poster
Hangul 이태원 클라쓰
Hanja 梨泰院 클라쓰
Genre Drama
Based on Itaewon Class
by Gang Jin
Developed by Kim Do-soo for Showbox
Written by Gang Jin
Directed by Kim Sung-Yoon
Starring Park Seo-Joon

Kim Da-mi

Yoo Jae-Myung

Kwon Nara

Composer Various artists
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 16
Production
Executive producer Jo Joon-Hyung
Producers Lee Sang-Yoon

Jung Soo-jin

Han Suk-won

Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 70 minutes
Production companies Showbox

Sium Content[a]

Itaewon Class Production Partners

Drama House (JTBC Studios)

Distributor JTBC

Netflix (international)

Release
Original network JTBC
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release January 31 –
March 21, 2020
External links
Website

Itaewon Class (Korean: 이태원 클라쓰; Hanja: 梨泰院 클라쓰; RR: Itaewon Keelless) is a 2020 South Korean television series starring Park Seo-JoonKim Da-miYoo Jae-Myung, and Kwon Nara. Based on the webtoon of the same name,[2] it is the first series to be produced by the film distribution company Showbox. It aired on JTBC in Korea from January 31 to March 21, 2020, and is streaming worldwide on Netflix.[3][4][5] The series won Best Drama Series at the 25th Asian Television Awards.[6][7]

In the case of the webtoon, when Kakao Page and Daum webtoon were added together, the cumulative number of readers was 10 million, the cumulative number of views was 300 million, and the rating was 9.9 points.

Synopsis[edit]

Due to an accident that killed his father, Park Sae-ro-Yi (Park Seo-Joon) attempted to kill Jang Geun-won (Ahn Bo-Hyun), the son of Janggi Group’s founder, Jang Die-hee (Yoo Jae-Myung). He was jailed and the woman he loved, Oh Soo-ah (Kwon Na-ra), was offered a university scholarship by Jang Die-hee and later became the Strategic Planning Head of Janggi Group.

After his release from prison, Park Sae-ro-Yi opens Danbam in Itaewon. He wants to be successful and seeks revenge on the Janggi Group. However, he is not too smart at managing his business. He then meets Jo Yi-see (Kim Da-mi).

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

Park Seo-Joon as Park Sae-ro-yi[8]

Proprietor of Dana, a bar-restaurant in Itaewon. In his youth, Sae-ro-Yi gets expelled from high school for punching CEO Jang’s son Geun-won, who was bullying a classmate, and becomes bereaved when his father is killed by Geun-won’s reckless driving. Angered by the loss, he attacks Geun-won, leading to his three-year imprisonment. Following his father’s steps, Sae-ro-Yi opens his bar-restaurant Dana in Itaewon seven years after he is released from jail, with the aim of expanding it into a franchise and defeating CEO Jang’s food company Janggi Group. In 2020, he becomes the CEO of his company IC Group.

Kim Da-mi as Jo Yi-seo[9]

Manager of Sae-Ro-Yi’s bar-restaurant Dana. Yi-see is a multi-talented and intelligent girl with an IQ of 162. She moved from New York to continue her studies in South Korea. She is also famous on social media as a power blogger and social media internet celebrity. Having a crush on Sae-Ro-Yi, she offers to become the manager of Dana. Her lack of empathy and callous behavior has many people believe she is a sociopath, but she does end up caring for her Dana coworkers. Despite being declined by Sae-ro-Yi, Yi-seo remains by his side as his manager and work partner while still maintaining feelings for him. In 2020, Yi-see becomes the CFO of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group. Eventually, Saroyan realizes his feelings for Yi-Seo and he confesses his love for her.

Yoo Jae-Myung as Jang Dae-hee[10]

CEO of food company Janggi Group. CEO Jang is a self-made man who, despite the odds, succeeds in turning his once small bar into a large franchise company. In his years of experience leading Janggi, he develops a strong belief in power and authority as a means to achieve his goals. He meets Sae-ro-Yi when the latter has a fight with his son Geun-won in high school and expects him to kneel as a submission of his power. However, Sasori always resisted kneeling and made his life harder for it. In 2020, he is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and doesn’t have much longer to live. Unfortunately, his illegal activities under Janggi were exposed and ruined his company. Despite kneeling before Sae-Ro-Yi for help, Sae-Ro-Yi absorbed Janggi into his company, leaving Die-Hee with nothing.

Kwon Nara as Oh Soo-ah[11]

Head of the strategic planning team in Janggi Group; Sae-ro-Yi’s former classmate and first love. Abandoned by her mother, Soo-ah grew up in an orphanage and became close with Sae-ro-Yi’s father Sung-yeol. She becomes acquainted with Sae-ro-Yi, who has a crush on her. After Sung-yell’s death, she receives a scholarship offer from Janggi Group and soon becomes an employee in the company. Though passionate about her work, she is torn between her allegiance to Janggi and her love for Sae-ro-Yi. Due to their conflicts of interests, the two would hold a long-term emotional relationship, but never a truly romantic one. Eventually, Soo-ah realizes Saroyan’s feelings have changed and the two remain friends. She later became a whistleblower to the authorities on the crimes that Janggi has committed in the past during her time in the company and later starts her restaurant.

Supporting[edit]

Dana staff[edit]

Kim Dong-hee as Jang Geun-soo[12]

CEO Jang’s second and illegitimate son; Yi-see’s classmate and staff member at Dana. Geun-soo has been bullied by his older brother Geun-won and he never felt loved by his parents. Upon turning 17, he left the Jang family and lived by himself from then on. After inconveniencing Dana in an incident, he decides to work for Sae-ro-Yi, whom he considers to be a “real adult.” He has a crush on Yi-see. However, after leaving Dana, Geun-soo chooses to work at his father’s company to become the successor to the Janggi Group. In 2020, he is the director of Janggi Group.

Ryu Kyung-soo as Choi Seung-kwon[13]

A staff member at Dana. Seung-Kwon was Sae-ro-Yi’s cellmate in prison. Believing that he cannot better his life outside of jail, he became a gangster under a gang leader upon his release. Seven years later, he meets Sae-ro-Yi who, to his surprise, had already opened a bar in Itaewon. Deeply respecting Sae-ro-Yi and his way to live a better life, he gives up being a gangster and starts working at Dana. In 2020, he becomes one of the directors of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group.

Lee Joo-young as Ma Hyeon-Yi[14]

Dunam’s chief cook. Hyun-Yi first met Sae-ro-yi in a factory where the two formerly worked, years before the start of Dana. She was hired as Dunam’s cook when Sae-ro-yi liked the food she once cooked for him back then. Hyun-Yi is a transgender woman and has been saving money for her sex reassignment surgery. In 2020, she becomes one of the directors of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group.

Chris Lyon as Kim To-ni[15]

Dammam’s GuineanKorean part-timer. Even though he cannot speak and understand English, To-ni is fluent in speaking Korean, owing to his Korean father and his one-year residence in South Korea, and French, the language he speaks in Guinea. Eventually, he can learn and speak a satisfactory amount of English.

Janggi Group[edit]

Ahn Bo-Hyun as Jang Geun-won[16]

CEO Jang’s first son and heir to Janggi Group. Geun-won was Sae-ro-Yi and Soo-ah’s classmate in high school who frequently bullied their classmate Ho-jin. He caused the vehicular accident that killed Sae-ro-Yi’s father Sung-yeol. Years later when he attempts to recruit Yi-see into Jangga, his confession to the crime is recorded by her and he attacks her until Sae-ro-Yi intervenes and gets him arrested. Die-hee deserts Geun-won by admitting his son’s crimes during his apology meeting and getting him sent to prison. In 2020, he is released and alongside Kim Hee-hon and his gang, Geun-won plans to get revenge on Yi-see.

Kim Hye-eon as Kang Min-jung[17]

Janggi Group’s executive director, who secretly plots to usurp CEO Jang. She is a close friend of Park Sung-yell, Park Sae-ro-Yi’s father.

Hong Seo-Joon as Mr. Kim[18]

Jang Daeheon’s right-hand man. He is very loyal to his boss.

Yoo Da-mi as Kim Sun-ae[19]

Jang Daeheon’s secretary and Kang Min-Jung’s spy.

Others[edit]

Lee David as Lee Ho-jin[20]

Sae-Moji’s investment manager. Ho-jin was Sae-ro-Yi, Soo-ah, and Geun-won’s classmate in high school. After years of bearing the constant bullying from Geun-won, he gets into a prestigious college and takes up business administration. He partners up with Sae-ro-Yi in taking revenge against Geun-won and CEO Jang. In 2020, he becomes the financial manager for Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group. In one of the flashback scenes when he visited Sae-ro-Yi in prison; he listed Sae-ro-Yi as a friend.

Kim Yeo-jin as Jo Jeong-min[21]

Yi-see’s mother, who disapproves of Yi-see quitting college and working at Dammam.

Yoon Kyung-ho as Oh Byeong-heon[22]

Detective in charge of Geun-won’s hit-and-run case which he was pressured to cover up. He quit his job after the case and is now one of Sae-ro-Yi’s suppliers.

Choi Yu-ri as Oh Hye-won[23]

Oh, Byeong-heron’s daughter, who is oblivious to Sae-ro-Yi’s connection with her father.

Kim Mi-keying as Kim Soon-rye[24]

To-nose Korean paternal grandmother. After her son’s death, she deeply regrets disapproving of her son’s marriage to a Guinean woman (To-nose mother), as it caused her son to run away. She is a loan shark who offers her services to Sae-ro-Yi when he moves his bar to a new location. She was also one of the first supporters of Janggi.

Won Hyun-Joon as Kim Hee-hoon[25]

Sae-ro-Yi’s former cellmate and a leader of a group of gangsters. Though initially cordial to both Sae-ro-Yi and Choi Seung-Kwon, he later allies himself with Jang Geun-won.

Han Hye-ji as Kook Bok-hee[26]

Yi-see and Geun-soo’s former classmate. Her bullying activities were exposed after Yi-see recorded her performing the act. After running into Yi-see months later, she attempted to assault her for ruining her reputation alongside her friends, only to be beaten down by Yi-see.

Special appearances[edit]

Ahn Sol-bin as Sae-ro-Yi’s classmate (Ep. 1)[27]

A student who had a crush on Sae-ro-Yi and had her confession rejected by him.

Son Hyun-jook as Park Sung-yeol (Ep. 1–2 & 15)[28]

Sae-ro-Yi’s father and former employee in Janggi Group. He taught Sae-ro-Yi to stick to his beliefs and to fight for what is right. He resigned from Janggi in defense of Sae-ro-Yi’s deed of stopping Geun-won’s bullying. He died in an accident caused by Geun-won.

Hong Seok-Cheon as himself (Ep. 2, 4, 9 & 16)[29]

Soo-ah’s acquaintance. He works at a bar that Sae-ro-Yi visits twice (years before and after opening Dana). They meet again after Sae-ro-Yi moves the location of his bar.

Yoon Park as Kim Sung-Hyun (Ep. 3)[30]

Geun-so’s elder friend goes to Dana with Geun-soo and Yi-see where the two get caught for underage drinking.

Cha Chung-hwa as Bureau Chief’s wife (Ep. 3)[31]

Mother of Bok-hee, whose behavior was exposed online by Yi-see.

I’m Seun as Bok-hee’s friend (Ep. 5)[32]

One of Bok-he’s friends. She, alongside Bok-hee and her friend, attempted to assault Yi-see after running into each other months after high school graduation.

Jung Yoo-min as Seo Jeong-In (Ep. 6)[33]

The daughter of the CEO of a pharmaceutical company and Geun-won’s blind date. The blind date was arranged by Geun-won’s father.

Seo Eon-soo as part-time job applicant (Ep. 6)[34]

Sae-ro-Yi’s acquaintance. She applied for the job that was eventually offered to Kim To-ni. Yi-see rejected her application out of jealousy of her and Sae-ro-Yi’s close relationship.

Kim Il-Jong as himself (Ep. 11 & 13)[35]

Host of the cooking program shows The Best Pub.

Jeon No-min as Do Jong-un (Ep. 11–12)[36]

CEO of the investment firm Jung Myung Holdings. He offers Sae-ro-Yi to franchiseDanBam. Later he was one of the sleeper agents for Die Hee to thwart Sae-ro-Yi plan to franchise Dana.

Lee Jun-Hyeon as Park Joon-gi (Ep. 11–13)[37]

A contestant on The Best Pub. He represents Janggi Group as the head cook and comes in second to Hyun-Yi during the final. He subsequently gets fired.

Park Bo-gum as Handsome Chef (Ep. 16)[38]

The new chef at Soo-ah’s restaurant in which Hong Seok-Cheon invested after he passed the job interview.

Kim Taehyung as Himself (Ep. 16)

BTS member V visited his friend Seo-Joon to perform a rendition of the show’s OST.

 

Comment:

 

Very enjoyable drama set in one of the most colorful neighborhoods in Korea, Itaewon’s- Seoul’s international quarter.

 

The basic plot is that of revenge.  The usual themes of rich people behaving badly, and corporate corruption. A young man in junior high comes to the aid of his classmate who is being bullied by the son of a rich family.  His father worked for the corporation.  The young man is told to apologize for calling out the actions of the bullies and refuses to do so.  His father is fired and attempts to open his restaurant with the aid of his son who has to drop out of school after the controversy.  The father is killed by his enemy drunk driving.  The young man attempts to kill his enemy and is sentenced to three years in prison.  He decides to get revenge.  It takes him ten years but in the end, he destroys the corporation.

 

There are several romantic sub-plots in the movie. The protagonist has to decide between two women.  He eventually chooses the woman who comes to work for him in the restaurant he opens in Itaewon.  There is also an LGBT sub-theme as one of his staff members is trans transiting to a woman.  There is also an intriguing sub-plot involving a half African young man who comes to Korea to find his Korean family.

 

Overall, very well done.

 

 

 

 

 

Others Worth Watching

 

Memories of the Alhambra

 

program.tving.com/tvn/tvnalhambra

Memories of the Alhambra is a 2018 South Korean television series, starring Hyun Bin and Park Shin-Hye. Primarily set in Spain, the series centers on a company CEO and a hostel owner who gets entangled in a series of mysterious incidents surrounding a new and intricate augmented reality game inspired by the stories of the Alhambra Palace. It aired on cable network tvN from December 1, 2018, to January 20, 2019, every Saturday and Sunday at 21:00. It is also available for online streaming on Netflix. Wikipedia

Genre: Science fantasy, Action, Thriller, Romance

Created by: Jennie Choi (Studio Dragon), Lee Myung-Han

Written by: Song Jae-Jung

 

Comment: Did not finish it but will return to it soon.  Had an intriguing SF plotline.

 

End Comment

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Negotiation (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Negotiation (film))

 

The Negotiation
Theatrical poster
Hangul 협상
Hanja 協商
Revised Romanization Hyeobsang
Directed by Lee Jong-Seok
Screenplay by Choi Sung-Hyun
Produced by Yoon Je-kyoon
Lee Sang-jik
Starring Son Ye-jin
Hyun Bin
Cinematography Lee Tae-Joon
Edited by Jung Jin-hee
Music by Hwang Sang-Joon
Production
companies
JK Film
CJ E&M[1]
Distributed by CJ Entertainment
Release date September 19, 2018 (South Korea)
Running time 114 minutes
Country South Korea
Language Korean
Budget 10 billion[2]
Box office US$15.6 million[3]

The Negotiation (Korean: 협상; Hanja: 協商; RR: Hyeobsang) is a 2018 South Korean action crime thriller film directed by Lee Jong-Seok and starring Son Ye-jin and Hyun Bin.[4][1] The film was released on September 19, 2018.[5][6][7]

Two Filipino men kidnap a couple and hold them hostage at a house in Yingjie, Seoul. Crisis negotiator Inspector Ha Chae-youn of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency, who was on a date and was called by her colleague, Superintendent Ahn Hyuk-su, is brought in to handle the situation, despite strong protests from her superior, Captain Jung Jun-gu. While Chae-youn is negotiating with the kidnappers, Captain Jung decides to send a police officer hit team to kill the men, shooting one kidnapper on the shoulder. He immediately kills the man he was holding and was shot dead afterward. The remaining kidnapper used the woman as a shield and dragged her to a room. The police team arrives and kills the kidnapper in the room. Chae-youn enters the room to find the woman who had been killed by the kidnapper before the police team entering the house. The woman dies in Chae-youn’s arms, leaving Chae-youn shocked.

Ten days later, a devastated Chae-youn decides to resign from the police force, but Captain Jung urges her to reconsider, before leaving on a work trip. Chae-youn is then urgently called upon by Ahn, who informs her that she has been urgently summoned to deal with a hostage crisis by the Commissioner himself. Upon arrival to a secret location, she meets with the Commissioner of Police Moon Jong-hyuk and Presidential Secretary Gong of National Security. She is ordered to negotiate with the kidnapper – Min Tae-gu, a Korea-based international arms dealer and UK citizen, who had kidnapped several Korean nationals from Bangkok – including a reporter named Lee Su-mok. Without any additional information, she hung up on Min twice after being offended by him and asks Secretary Gong to reveal to her the necessary details. Not wanting to talk, the two men ordered Chief Han to talk to Min instead, while she is being hesitant about doing so. Upon seeing the negotiations going sour, she takes the seat from Chief Han. While negotiating with Min video conferencing, she is shocked to discover that Captain Jung, who was supposed to be on a trip, has also been kidnapped by Min as well,

Chae-youn is later informed that the hostages are being held at an island in the Malacca Straits, where a joint military-police op has been sent to, intent on freeing them. Han also informs them that Daehan Daily, a news outlet Lee is working for, had been ordered to keep silent of their employee’s situation, as requested by the President. Min later demands to see the CEO of Daehan Daily, Yoon Dong-hoon, Lee’s boss. While talking with Dong-hoon, Min demands to know whether Lee is one of his reporters or not. Min threatens Yoon that his own family could be in danger, revealing that he knows of their whereabouts. Commissioner Moon cuts into their conversation to stop Yoon from telling the truth. Because of this, Min shoots Captain Jung dead, which further shocked Chae-youn. Commissioner Moon and Secretary Gong bring in negotiators from the National Intelligence Services to take over and order Chae-youn, Ahn, and even Han to leave the site.

Outside, Han reveals to them that Lee is a black agent working for the NIS, whose mission was to spy on Min’s syndicate. She tells them that Min is an arms dealer working in the Malacca Straits, selling every kind of weapons and equipment to other criminals in the majority of the Southeast Asian countries. Chae-youn’s two colleagues arrive in their van, and Chae-youn sought to find out the truth themselves. She then asks Ahn to follow Yoon and ask him further. Back inside, the NIS team approached Min aggressively, demanding that Min release his hostages or otherwise they will bombard his location, killing Agent Lee with him. Unbothered, Min reveals that he had also kidnapped a family of four, keeping the NIS under this thumb. Min demands to bring Chae-youn back as he will only talk to her. With no other choice, Chief Han goes over to bring Chae-youn, along with her team, back inside.

This time, Chae-youn demands the NIS to tell her everything that they know about Min. Min demands Chae-youn to bring Koo Gwan-su—chairman of Nine Electronics, an arms company. As they wait, the NIS tells Chae-youn that Min used to work for Koo as the man in charge of dealing with the company’s illegal activities. When Min decided to work alone as an arms dealer in Malacca Straits, Koo betrays Min and tipped him off to the NIS. Koo also revealed the $50 million worth of taxes that he had evaded, and due to his ‘honesty, the government practically erased his criminal activities. When Chae-youn asks where Koo is, the NIS agent reveals to her that they were all inside the Nine Electrics weapons laboratory. Koo himself had funded the entire operation of the NIS to hunt Min down. In a hotel suite lounge somewhere downtown were Koo, NIS Deputy Chief Park In-kyu, Air Force Commander Son Jung-Tae, and the Chief of National Security himself, Hwang Ju-ik. These four men had been keeping a close eye on the entire operation.

Meanwhile, Ahn found out from the escaping Yoon that NIS Deputy Chief Park was the one who asked him to give Agent Lee a false Daehan Daily ID. Koo arrives at the site and begins to talk with Min. Min asks Koo to restore a certain Swiss bank account, and Koo agrees to it. However, Min had further demanded. He asks Koo why he had killed a woman named Yoo Hyun-Ju. Koo denies any knowledge of any Hyun-Ju, and Min began to tell Chae-youn of Hyun-Ju. Min introduced Hyun-Ju to Koo as his secretary. In reality, Hyun-Ju was to keep records of hidden, expensive paintings that Koo owned and kept. These paintings were worth 10 billion won each, and profits from these paintings would be shared between Koo, Park, Son, and Hwang. Some of the paintings were kept in a house that Hyun-Ju and presumably her husband stayed in. It is revealed that Hyun-Ju was the woman who died in Chae-youn’s arms ten days ago, and Min convinces Chae-youn that something was amiss during that operation, which resulted in Hyun-Ju’s death, and the disappearance of the paintings in the house almost immediately. To further prove his point, Min plays an audio recording of a conversation between the four corrupt men. This recording was done by Hwang himself, where Min explained that Hwang never fully trusted the three other men he was working with and had a habit of keeping recording devices for important conversations. Min then demands Hwang to show up and talk to him in one hour, otherwise, he’ll kill every hostage—including the children.

Chae-young and her team validate the information Min had given as they try to figure out the connection between Min and Hyun-Ju. Secretary Gong lies to Chae-young, telling her that Hwang was with the President and that he couldn’t come. Meanwhile, Ahn was able to track down Chief Park’s phone records. There, he found out that Captain Jung had accepted a bribe from Chief Park. Captain Jung was under the command of Chief Park, and that they planned to kill Hyun-Ju by using the Filipino kidnappers as an alibi. Chae-youn resumes the negotiations with Min, telling Min that Hyun-Ju’s case will be reopened. Min demands to talk with Commissioner Moon. Min asks if Koo is being questioned by the police and that if Hwang is really with the President. Before answering, they found out from a Thai server that Min had been live-streaming the entire situation on YouTube, which sends the country into a frenzy. Upon figuring out that Koo is not being questioned, and that Hwang is in hiding, Min shoots Agent Lee in the leg. He gives Hwang one last chance to show himself.

Back in their lounge, Hwang orders Chief Park to invent a story and Commander Son to begin the military operation immediately. Hwang wants Min dead, along with the hostages. Meanwhile, Ahn returns to Hyun-Ju’s home, where the kidnapping ten days ago occurred. There, he found a photo of Somang Orphanage, an old orphanage where Hyun-Ju came from. He goes over to the new orphanage, and he found out that Hyun-Ju’s real name wasn’t Yoon Hyun-Ju, but Min Hyun-Ju—she was Min’s younger sister. Back in the lab, the military team arrived in Min’s location and authorizes the mission, despite Chae-youn’s protests. Min reveals that a bomb is strapped on one of the hostages, revealing a suicide for all of them. Either way, the team blows up a signal tower—stopping their communication. Chae-youn tries to stop the team from entering Min’s hideout as a bomb is present. Hwang (through Commander Son) pressures them to continue, and the team enters the hideout. However, as soon as they moved in, the room had exploded, presumably from Min’s suicide bomb, and killing the hostages inside. Hwang and his cronies were finally able to relax, and the NIS were packing up their things.

As Chae-youn stares at the last footage of their negotiations with Min in despair, she notices through the background that Min wasn’t in Southeast Asia, but in South Korea all along. That night, Ahn went to the old orphanage building and found all of the hostages safe. Meanwhile, Min and his gang arrived at the Nine Electronics weapons lab. He orders his fellow gang to go home and takes the bomb with him. Min storms the lounge and finally catches Hwang, Koo, Park, and Son, with the bomb strapped to his chest. Chae-young, convinced Secretary Gong to reveal the true location of Hwang and his cronies so that they can stop Min. Min shoots Koo, activates the bomb via a detonator, and Chae-youn arrives at the lounge to finally meet Min. She apologizes to Min for not being able to protect Hyun-Ju, and she vows to defend Min at any cost to bring the remaining cronies to justice. Min reveals to her that he asked Hyun-Ju to betray Koo by stealing every bit of information he had. He believed that his plan ultimately led to his sister’s death. He raises the gun at Hwang, and he was shot to the head by a sniper outside. A flashback reveals that Min backfired with his plan, telling his sister that the plan is too dangerous after all. However, Hyun-Ju wanted to proceed with the plan, so that the two of them can find a place to live in silence and peace.

As the team arrives to escort Hwang, Park, Son, and Chae-youn outside, Chae-youn overheard that the detonator wasn’t turned on, and Min planned to die in the end and bring the corrupt men to justice. Chae-young chases Hwang outside, prematurely telling them of their arrest as she shouts their rights to them. As their car leaves, the reporters then surround Chae-youn. Chae-youn and Ahn went to an overlooking spot, where they made a makeshift memorial for Min and Hyun-Ju. Chae-youn shows Ahn of Min’s pen drive presumably with the dealings of Hwang and his cronies, as stolen by Hyun-Ju. In court, Hwang, Park, Son, and Chae-young appear, with Chae-young as a prime witness. The pen drive is revealed to the court as evidence, and the film ends with Chae-young reciting an oath.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Son Ye-jin as Ha Chae-yoon[8]

Hyun Bin as Min Tae-gu[9]

Supporting[edit]

Kim Sang-ho as Ahn Hyuk-soo

Jang Young-Nam as Section Chief Han

Jang Gwang as Hwang Soo-suk

Choi Byung-mo as Secretary Kong[10]

Jo Young-jin as Chairman Koo

Kim Jong-goo as CEO Yoon

Yoo Yeon-soo as Chief Moon

Lee Joo-young as Lee Da-bin

Kim Min-sang as Deputy Department Head Park

Park Sung-Geun as Operation officer

Han Ki-Joon as Lieutenant General Son

Park Soo-young as Section Chief Choi

Jung In-gyeom as Lee Sang-mok

Lee Si-a as Yoo Yeon-Joo

Lee Hak-joo as Park Min-woo

Special appearance[edit]

Lee Moon-sikas Capt. Jung

Production[edit]

Principal photography began on June 17, 2017, in PajuGyeonggi Province.[11][12][13]

Release[edit]

The film premiered in South Korea on September 19, 2018.[14][15]

By September 2018, the film was sold to over 22 countries. It was released in North America on September 20, in Singapore, Malaysia, and Brunei on October 4, in Hong Kong and Macau in early October, in Vietnam and Taiwan on October 19, and in Indonesia on October 24, 2018.[16][17]

The film was released on VOD services and digital downloads on October 17, 2018.[18]

 

Comment: This very engaging police thriller taking place in Bangkok and Seoul.

Usual high-level political corruption and rich people behaving badly.  Also features a woman protagonist who goes against her superiors and saves the day.

 

End comment

 

No exit  movie

 

Comment:

 

Another engaging police crime drama.  Very engrossing and great acting. Takes place in Cheju who a mafia figure who goes on the run after being betrayed by his boss.

 

End comment

 

https://mydramalist.com/28794-exit

This was another great Korean movie. It was packed with action and comedy. This movie kept you on edge on your seat and glued your eyes to the screen. I love how Jo Jung Suk always keeps his quirky side whenever he played a character. He never disappoints me in the comedy area. Love him in dramas and movies.

Images for no exit k drama

 

More Images for no exit k drama

EXIT (2018) – MyDramaList

https://mydramalist.com/28771-exit

Exit is an interesting drama with an old concept depicted in a new way. The entire two hours were engrossing for me and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Choi Tae Joon was natural, strong, and intense in playing his role and the rest of the cast also did a pretty good job. The background score is quite good though it has no OSTs. Two hours is not much.

 

Exit (Korean Drama, 2018, 엑시트) @ Han Cinema

https://www.hancinema.net/korean_drama_Exit.php

Exit (Korean Drama, 2018, 엑시트) – Find the cast, latest updates, latest news, legal streaming links, DVDs, Blu-rays, collectibles, latest trailers, latest …

 

 

 

Sisyphus: The Myth (2021)

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An unfathomable incident introduces a genius engineer to dangerous secrets of the world — and to a woman from the future who’s come looking for him. Han Tae Sul, a co-founder of Quantum and Time, is a genius engineer with the highest level of coding skills and outstanding looks that outweighs his engineer fashion sense. Due to his innovative achievements, Quantum and Time is a world-class company, dubbed “The Miracle of South Korea’s Engineering Industry.” In reality, Tae Sul has constantly caused his company’s stocks to fluctuate after his brother’s death ten years ago. One day, he witnesses something unbelievable. To reach the truth, he sets off on a dangerous journey. Kang Seo Hai is a survivor of a future dystopian world. With the survival skills that she’s learned from living amongst gangsters and warlords, she travels back to save Han Tae Sul. (Source: Netflix, Newsmen) Edit Translation

English

Native Title: 시지프스: The Myth

Also Known As Sisyphus: The Fable, Sipleses, Sisyphus

Director: Jin Hyeon

Screenwriter: Jeon Chan HoLee Je In

Genres: ActionThrillerMysteryRomanceDramaFantasy

Tags: Time TravelGeniusRich Male LeadUncover A TruthDeath Of SiblingEngineerSassy Female LeadPre-producedStrong Female LeadFuture (Vote or add tags)

Where to Watch Sisyphus: The Myth

Netflix

Subscription (sub)

Cast & Credits

Add Cast

Jo Seung Woo

Han Tae Sul

Main Role

Park Shin Hye

Kang Seo Hai

Main Role

Kim Byung Chula

Seo Won Ju / “Sigma”

Main Role

Sung Dong-Il

President Park [President of Asia Mart]

Support Role

Tae In Ho

Eddie Kim / Kim Seung Bok [Tae Sul’s friend / Co-founder of Quantum & Time]

Support Role

Chae Jong Hyeon

Sun / Choi Jae Sun [Chinese restaurant delivery guy]

Support Role

 

All you need is love

Sisyphus: The Myth is an intriguing drama. The thrilling teaser that was released late last year stoked the flames of excitement for many avid K-drama viewers. Coupled with a cast that’s headlined by bankable stars the likes of Cho Seung Woo and Park Shin Hye, it became one of the most talked-about and highly anticipated shows for 2021. When it finally aired, however, it polarized opinions here in MDL and left several viewers’ expectations somewhat unfulfilled, to the extent that the ratings steadily declined to the current score hovering at around 8.

Some continued to enjoy the show, for various reasons, and I happen to be one of them. Allow me to share my (spoiler-free) thoughts and then you can make your own decision on whether or not to embark on what has largely been a fun-filled escapist roller coaster ride.

What is it about?
In a nutshell, a woman from the dystopian future of South Korea travels back in time in the hopes of altering the course of history by preventing the seemingly inevitable fate that befell the country, the looming catastrophe of nuclear war. Central to this mission is the man who invented the time-traveling machine. These two characters are played by Park Shin Hye and Cho Seung Woo respectively.

The drama contains a mix of science fiction, action, drama, and romance genres imbued with themes of revenge, redemption, remorse, love, friendship, and familial bond. The director is Jin Hyeon, who notably helmed The Legend of the Blue Sea, The Master’s Sun, and City Hunter, among others. The screenplay is written by the husband and wife team of Jeon Chan Ho and Lee Je In, for only their third production.

This show is jointly produced by Drama House and JTBC and has been publicized as the network’s 10th-anniversary special drama. Its title is derived from the ancient character from Greek mythology, King Sisyphus of Corinth, and is completely pre-produced with principal photography that has taken place toward the end of 2020.

What’s great about it?

The Production Values
As expected of a JTBC production, this drama is very well, made. I love the cinematography (in particular the indoor lighting), the many gorgeous scenic views of both Seoul in the present time and the vast landscape of the dystopian future. The set designs for various settings are quite exemplary while the special effects (CGIs, firefights, and pyrotechnics) are considered top tier for a show of this nature.

The Acting and Cast
In my humble opinion, the leads are fantastic and I have absolutely no complaints. While Cho Seung Woo fully embodies the character of Han Tae Sul, the same goes for Park Shin Hye’s Kang Seo Hai. They deliver very strong performances in their portrayal of deeply flawed and emotionally scarred individuals. These are the types of roles that perhaps mature actors with adequate professional and life experiences are better-equipped to articulate and convey convincingly, which is very much the case here.

It’s interesting to note that unlike Cho Seung Woo’s other more serious roles, especially that of Hwang Shi Mock in Stranger, here his Han Tae Sul is much more comedic and mischievous with a copious dose of flamboyance and swagger. Despite possessing similar social awkwardness, this character is remarkably more fun while his ingenuity in getting out of tricky situations bears an uncanny resemblance to the MacGyver persona.

Such nuanced characterization is depicted by the other veteran supporting cast as well, notably Sung Dong Il, Kim Byung Chula, and Kim Jong Tae. Kim Byung Chula in particular surprised me with his depiction of Seo Won Ju. Despite being slightly OTT, I suspect he had the time of his life being “unleashed” from his usual more understated roles. Here he plays “dual characters” where his versatility is quite commendable.

Special mention goes to the young actor Lee Joo Won, who plays the young version of Seo Won Ju. This kid truly gave me goosebumps with his chilling portrayal.

The Action
For the most part, the choreography has been outstanding. From the numerous unarmed combat sequences to the firefights involving some pretty impressive military hardware. It’s not often that we see plenty of intense (and at times, logic-defying) gun battles in a non-military drama so this aspect of the production is indeed praiseworthy. Other forms of action include a lot of hard running in chasing (and being chased by) a multitude of characters.

The Romance
This particular theme is so beautifully and convincingly conveyed. It helps immensely that Cho Seung Woo and Park Shin Hye abundantly possess such wonderful chemistry which is poignantly manifested amidst the ensuing intrigue and mayhem. The pairing of Han Tae Sul and Kang Seo Hai, in many ways, makes a lot of sense. They are each plagued by a traumatic past and rendered seriously flawed, emotionally damaged, and are now fighting against the odds to change their fate.

What could’ve been better?

The Science
I love the concept here about time traveling to the past to change the future which gives me vibes of The Twelve Monkeys where the premise is quite similar. However, I do feel that the science as depicted in the show is super messy. Many technical aspects are open to interpretation and left to the viewers to fill in the blanks, as the story progresses. It’s a process of trial and error where we discover new things during every episode. The finale is quite possibly the most mind-blowing of all.

The Screenplay
A parallel narrative and converging plot format are used to tell the story, which includes numerous flashbacks and flashforwards by various major characters in multiple timelines – the past, present, and future. Sometimes title cards are used to indicate the date, but not when the scene is obvious. It can get a little disorienting unless viewers pay close attention to the details.

How and why certain events transpire are quite convoluted and require too much deductive reasoning to derive a sense of what the answers could be. The credibility of certain characters is questionable while quite a number of the sequences appear utterly ridiculous and fantastical, despite the sci-fi tag. The seeming lack of logic in certain respects of the overarching plot has led me to strongly suspect the screenwriters were high on recreational psychoactive substances as they were writing this.

Overall
The sooner viewers suspend disbelief and forgo questioning how the technology works by accepting the science as it is, the less confusing the show would appear to be. Regardless of the perceived weaknesses resulting from the flawed execution of the concept, I found myself enjoying the wild and, at times, exhilarating ride once I shut down my cerebral process and went instinctive. I would advise you to do the same for this is the only way to truly appreciate Sisyphus: The Myth. And if you do decide to watch this, be rest assured – the ending is very much a happy one, for everyone (kind of).

Mediocre Myth

At outset, the drama starts as an interesting and pioneering perspective of time travel. With the use of new ideas like uploader and downloader, the science-fiction aspect is on par with that of the contemporary world of science fiction entertainment.

Along with this, is the backdrop of a nuclear war involving Koreas, it provides an exquisite playing field for proficient storytelling. These themes remind me of the “TENET” movie.

The show is almost convincible scientifically about time travel*. But that’s where the spectacle of this show ends. This show has countless flaws.

One, after setting the story, the show becomes more character-driven and not plot-driven. Thus, giving little scope for further exploring the sci-fi elements or packing it with more plot elements. Viewers are taken through detailed narratives about various side characters. These insights could have been less detailed.

Two, Will over Wits. Almost every scene has some sort of test for characters to make a choice. Almost every character ends up making emotion-driven decisions and not reason-driven. This leads to a countless loop of bad folks coercing good folks to fall into their traps. Countless episodes are wasted in these cat-and-mouse endeavors.

Three, Lack of an alternate answer to the recurring question “Girl or World?” Right in the first instance of asking this question, the answer is undeniably obvious. Yet, the protagonist delays to choose the answer giving false hope of the possibility of an alternative answer. Had this been answered earlier, it would have ended the show quicker.

Four, Romance: The Leads’ relationship feels more like comradeship and less like a romantic one. If at all it is present, it is not so passionate and intense given their life-threatening circumstances.

Five, the beginning of the time loop. How did all this begin that is, the events right before the first loop are hardly explained. I believe that explaining a bootstrap paradox is an unimaginable task.

Despite the flaws, there are a couple of appreciable elements like One, ambitious production. The initial fights and stunts scenes felt amateurish in CGI. But the events of the future were well, produced. The drone chase scene was a personal favorite. The fights scenes were really good, especially the last fight of the future timeline. Two, despite the ever-looming question of “save the world”, the intermittent scenes of future events were very imaginative. Three, Badass FL and Genius ML both bring something unique to the plot. Four, the “Act of Kindness” (without letting the spoiler out), was the best moment in the entire drama and gave the best “glimmer of hope”, an essential feature of the Sci-Fi genre.

Acting-wise, both the leads are exceptional. PSH stunt scenes are awe-worthy. Kim Byung Chula does an incredible job. Music-wise, I liked the title music of whizzing sound and the end song. Rewatch value is lower as sci-fi elements are hardly convoluted.

Sisyphus: The Myth is an inventive concept but fails in storytelling.
~~
*Logical inconsistencies do exist.

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Comment::

 

I have to agree with the consensus on this one.  It just did not work for me.  The plot was just too convoluted and contradictory.  The acting was superb but the writing was sub-par particularly the ending.   One principle of creative writing is that when you write you are creating an alternative world.  And every world has rules.  Violating the rules of your alternative universe leaves the readers or viewers confused, disappointed, or even angry.  The special effects were good, not great. The plot had too many holes in it.  In the end, it was defeated by the writing.   End comment

 

Space Sweepers K SF Drama

 

Space Sweepers

Space Sweepers is a 2021 South Korean space Western film directed by Jo Sung-hee, starring Song Jong-ki, Kim Tae-Ri, Jin Seon-kyu, and Yoo Hai-jin. Regarded as the first Korean space blockbuster, it was released on Netflix on February 5, 2021.Wikipedia

Director Sung-hee

Produced by: Yoon In-beom, Kim Soo-jin

Writer(s): Yoon Seung-min, Yoo-king Seo-ae, Jo Sung-hee

Space Sweepers (Korean: 승리호; Hanja: 勝利號; RR: Sangho; lit. Spaceship Victory) is a 2021 South Korean space Western film directed by Jo Sung-hee, starring Song Jong-kiKim Tae-RiJin Seon-kyu, and Yoo Hae-jin.[2] Regarded as the first Korean space blockbuster,[3] it was released on Netflix on February 5, 2021.[4][5]

In the year 2092, Earth has become nearly uninhabitable. The UTS Corporation builds a new orbiting home for humanity that mimics the natural processes on Earth; however, only a chosen few are permitted to ascend and become UTS citizens, while those remaining on Earth breathe polluted air.

To regulate the population in orbit and keep an eye on the non-citizens, UTS governs them via a strict set of rules and taxes. Many non-citizens from all across the globe work as space sweepers, collecting space debris floating in Earth’s orbit and selling it to the company factory for survival. The plot follows such a crew of space sweepers and their ship, the Victory.

Victory’s crew has Kim Tae-ho, Tiger Park, and Bubs (an android), all led by Captain Jang. Tiger Park handles the ship’s machinery and was a drug baron on Earth. Bubs used to be a robot soldier but now helps repair the ship and cast the net for space junk while saving up to get a complete skin graft. Jang was one of the child geniuses sponsored by UTS and created several hi-tech inventions for the company but, after discovering the company’s true workings, became a pirate and tried to assassinate James Sullivan. Her crew was killed and Sullivan survived, so she changed identities and had an eye transplant. Tae-ho, once a child soldier, is on a search for his daughter (Su-ni); who was lost and ejected into space after space debris collided with the station they were staying at. His sole life aim is to pay for the authorities’ recovery team to locate her body tracker before she drifts out of orbit and gets lost in space forever.

After picking up a car floating in orbit, they discover a child in it. News reports say that she is a robot named Dorothy, and has a weapon of mass destruction inside her created by the terrorist group Black Fox. The crew also finds a smartphone in Dorothy’s bag with several missed calls from someone named Kang Hyeon-u. They call back and, assuming the other party to be part of the Black Fox group, negotiate two million dollars for returning Dorothy. Tiger finds Dorothy drawing in his cabin and starts a conversation with her, as he finds himself drawn to her.

Tae-ho and Tiger carry Dorothy to a nightclub to collect the ransom, but she wanders off in the crowd. UTS soldiers have lain in wait, and a massacre ensues. Tiger and Tae-ho locate Dorothy when Soldier 01 zeroes in and shoots at them. Dorothy’s eyes change color, and the trio is protected from the blast by a sort of force field around them. Jang is watching everything through a feed on the ship. She also notices the man who came to collect Dorothy shouting after her and calling her Kotani. The trio makes it back to the ship, and Dorothy busies herself drawing and playing. When asked by Jang what her name is, Dorothy says Kotani is her Korean name. Tae-ho ignores her, thinking she is a robot, while Tiger becomes friendly with her and suggests keeping her. Tae-ho dismisses the idea and goes to sets up another call with Kang Hyeon-u to rearrange the exchange.

Dorothy and Tae-ho find tomatoes on the plant that Dorothy had helped revive from a dead tree, and sell them. Jang finds papers in Dorothy’s backpack and goes through them. Bubs put makeup on Dorothy and tell her the story of Tae-ho; as a child soldier, Tae-ho was Soldier 01 at the age of 17. On one of his voyages, Tae-ho shot and boarded a ship that carried several fleeing non-citizens and killed them all. He noticed a baby still alive in the arms of a dead woman and adopted the girl. She rekindled his humanity and Tae-ho found himself unable to hurt others – as a result, he was dismissed from the force, made homeless, and reduced to a non-citizen. After one year of homelessness, Tae-ho became desperate and gambled, neglecting Su-ni. She wandered away to find a snack, and while outside there was a debris impact that caused her to be blown into space, with Tae-ho helplessly witnessing it from an airlock.

A masked man follows Kotani to the toilet in the factory. Her screams alert Tae-ho and Tiger, who rush to save her but are ambushed by a group of masked people. Tiger beats them all and Jang intervenes, discovering they are other space junk collectors working with Black Fox. Their leader, Karuma, explains that Black Fox is not a terrorist organization, but rather an environmental group and that Kotani is not an android but a human child. Born with a congenital disease, her father Kang Hyeon-u injected her with nanobots found in space debris to save her life. The nanobots helped not only saved Kotani but also gave her a unique power: Kotani could now communicate with other nanobots and heal and protect things. Sullivan found this out and used Kotani to turn Mars into a healthy, green planet. He now plans to kill Dorothy in a hydrogen bomb explosion (since nanobots can only be destroyed by breaking them into atoms through extremely high temperatures). Given its proximity to Earth, the explosion would cause the factory to fall onto the planet, destroying the Earth and making Mars the only viable option for all humans.

The crew decides to unite Kotani with her father and disable the bomb, with the help of the Black Foxes who will locate and take Dr. Kang to the meeting point. Soldiers attack them, but Tae-ho and Kotani manage to flee on the Victory. They enter a space debris field, where nanobots begin to consume their ship. Kotani communicates with them, and the nanobots disperse. They enter the factory where the meet-up is scheduled, only to be ambushed. The UTS soldiers kill all the Black Foxes and Dr. Kang before kidnapping Kotani. Sullivan leaves Tae-ho four million dollars in return for abandoning Kotani. Tae-ho takes the money, but the rest decide to save Kotani – even if it kills them. Tae-ho goes to give the money to the UTS officers, and they hand over Su-no’s last found remains to him – her clothes, crayons, and Korean writing book. In it, Su-ni had written that she wanted to be a good person like her father. This reminds Tae-ho of the promise he made to Su-ni, to be the best man she had ever known. He takes back the money and returns to the ship with a new zeal before they all go to save Kotani.

Sullivan goes live, announcing the Mars program. The bomb has been armed in the factory, and Kotani is strapped to it on a chair. The team frees Kotani, but Jang discovers that the bomb cannot be defused. It will not only destroy anything in its blast range but also destroy any nanobots in the vicinity of 5,000 kilometers. The only way Kotani’s nanobots (and her life) can be saved is if she is out of range. The team sets off to fly 5,000 km away, but is interrupted by Soldier 01; Tiger fights her and ejects her from the factory. The team sends out a message to the rest of the Space Sweepers, who come to their aid, fighting the attacking troops. The population of Earth learns of Sullivan’s true goals when they hear him recount his plan through the Space Sweepers’ emergency comm channel. The Victory is intercepted by Sullivan himself, who tries to fight the crew to get back Kotani. When it seems they have lost the battle, Tiger and Tae-ho manage a final boost that puts the ship just out of the blast range. The crew reveals their real plan: Kotani was left safely behind with other Space Sweepers. The Victory had removed the bomb from the core and carried it away, ready to sacrifice their lives to save Earth and Kotani. The bomb explodes; however, Kotani has summoned the nanobots to protect the Victory, keeping the crew safe.

In the aftermath of the battle, UTS apologizes for the cover-up of the true goals and promise to help make Earth more habitable. Kotani is adopted by the crew and, using her powers, enables Tae-Ho to say goodbye to Su-ni. Bubs get her skin graft. Tiger and Tae-Ho take Kotani down to Earth to help grow trees and they all continue space sweeping.

Cast[edit]

Song Jong-ki as Kim Tae-ho – Former Commander of the Space Guards and the first-ever UTS Genius.

Kim Tae-Ri as Captain Jang / Jang Hyun-sook – Former Special Forces Squad officer who later deserted her post to create her pirate organization. She attempted to assassinate CEO James Sullivan in which her entire pirate crew was killed.

Jin Seon-kyu as Tiger Park / Park Kyung-soo – Former Drug King who escaped Earth after being arrested and sentenced to death.

Yoo Hai-jin as Robot Bubs – Former military robot trying to save up for her gender confirmation services

Richard Armitage as James Sullivan – The CEO of UTS.

Kim Mu-yell as Kang Hyeon-u – Kang Kotani’s father and a scientist.

Park Ye-rim as Dorothy / Kang Kotani – First believed to be a robot, she is a human who was injected with nanobots by her father as a last resort to heal her.

Kim Hyang-gi as Bubs’ new body

 

 

Comment: an enjoyable dystopian story taking place in space after much of the earth is uninhabitable and a Mars colonization drive is launched.  Usual political and corporate corruption and rich people behaving badly.   The romance between the lead characters is hinted at but never resolved.  The child star is the future star in the making.  The dialogue was well done.   I enjoyed this one. End comment

 

The Last Man Standing K Drama

 

 

The Man Standing Next

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Man Standing Next
South Korean theatrical release poster
Hangul 남산의 부장들
Hanja 南山의 部長들
Directed by Woo Min-ho
Screenplay by Woo Min-ho

Lee Ji-min

Produced by Kim Chula-Yong
Starring Lee Byung-Hun

Lee Sung-min

Kwak Do-won

Lee Hee-Joon

Cinematography Go, Nakasone,
Edited by Jeong Ji-eon
Music by Jo Yeong-wok
Production
company
Hive Media Corp.
Distributed by Showbox
Release date 22 January 2020
Running time 114 min
Language Korean
Budget $18 million
Box office $34.7 million[1]

The Man Standing Next (Korean: 남산의 부장들; Hanja: 南山의 部長들; RR: Nnamani bujangdeul; lit. Chiefs of Namsan) is a 2020 South Korean political drama film directed by Woo Min-ho. Based on an original novel of the same title, the film stars Lee Byung-HunLee Sung-minKwak Do-won, and Lee Hee-Joon as the high ranking officials of the Korean government and the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA) during the presidency of Park Chung-hee 40 days before his assassination in 1979.[2]

 

Comment:  this one resonates with me.  My Korean adventures began in August 1979 a few months before the assassination that changed modern Korean history occurred.  I had just arrived in Korea and had finished up my training. We were due to go to our assignments but the assassination occurred and we were sent to Seoul to wait to see if Peace Corps Korea would be pulled out. We were cleared to go to our assignments in early November 1979.

The drama hints at an alleged US CIA plot to take out Park Chung-hee. Not sure I believe that the US CIA had anything to do with it but perhaps we at least knew in advance and did nothing to stop it.   The drama was well done, well written, with great dialogue, and well reflects the tensions of the period.

End Comment

Mr. Sunshine

 

 

DP

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

A gripping drama based on true events about life in the Korean military and why some soldiers run away from their obligations amid the constant harassment and strict discipline of the Korean military. This drama hit a nerve among many Koreans who recall their trouble times in the military. The military has announced that they are discontinuing the DP unit but swore it had nothing to do with this drama.

 

 

D.P. (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

D.P.
Promotional poster
Korean 디피
Genre Drama

Military

Based on D.P Dog’s Day
by Kim Bo-tong
Screenplay by Kim Bo-tong

Han Jun-hee

Directed by Han Jun-hee
Starring Jung Hae-in

Koo Kyo-hwan

Kim Sung-kyun

Son Seok-Koo

Composer Primary
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 6
Production
Executive producers Bien Seung-min

Han Jun-hee

Producer Kim Dong-min
Cinematography Yoo Ji-sun
Editor Park Min-sun
Running time 45–55 minutes
Production companies Climax Studio

Shortcake

Distributor Netflix
Release
Original network Netflix
Original release August 27, 2021

D.P. (an acronym for Deserter Pursuit) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Han Jun-hee, from a screenplay by Kim Bo-tong and Han, based on the Lashing webtoon D.P Dog’s Day by Kim. The series stars Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-kyun, and Son Seok-Koo.[1][2] It premiered in six parts on Netflix on August 27, 2021.[3][4]

Synopsis[edit]

Set in 2014, D.P. tells the story of a team of Korean military police with their mission to catch deserters.

The series magnifies the undesirable nature of the military, especially within a South Korean context. The widespread bullying and hazing as well as the mindset for the “survival of the fittest” are rife, with those presumed the “weakest” thrown to the bottom of the pile and served horrifying experiences at the hands of their superiors and compatriots.

Private Ahn Joon-ho and Corporal Han Ho-Yul both team up to find the deserters, and end up on an adventurous journey.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Jung Hae-in as Private Ahn Joon-ho

Koo Kyo-hwan as Corporal Han Ho-Yul

Kim Sung-Kyun as Sergeant First Class Park Bum-gu

Son Seok-Koo as Captain Im Ji-sup

Supporting[edit]

Jo Hyun-churl as Jo Suk-bong

Shin Seung-ho as Hwang Jang-soo

Park Se-joon as Heo Ki-young

Park Jung-woo as Shin Woo-suk

Kim Dong-young as Choi Joon-mok

Lee Jun-young as Jung Hyun-min

Choi Joon-young as Heo Chi-do

Moon Sang-hoon as Kim Roo-ri

Hyun Bong-sik as Chun Yong-duck

Hong Kyung as Ryu Yi-Kang

Bae Yoo-ram as Kim Kyu

Han Woo-Yul as Tae Sung-goon

Guest[edit]

Go Kyung-pyro as Corporal Park Sung-woo (Ep. 1)

Kwon Hae-Hyo as Ahn Joon-ho’s father (Eps. 1, 3–4)

Lee Seol as Shin Woo-Seok’s sister (Eps. 1 & 6)

Lee Jong-ok as an hinoeuma employee (Ep. 2)

Episodes[edit]

No. Title Directed by Written by Original release date
1 “A Man Holding Flowers” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
2 “Daydream” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
3 “That Woman” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
4 “The Monty Hall Problem” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
5 “Military Dog” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
6 “Onlookers” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

In late June 2020, Lashing officially announced that Lashing Studio and Homemade Film would co-produce a 6-part adaptation of the hit webtoon D.P: Dog Days by Kim Bo-tong, to be released exclusively through Netflix.[5][6] The story is based on Kim’s own experience during his mandatory military service.[7]

Director and co-writer Han Jun-hee had wanted to work on the webtoon’s adaptation “for five or six years [before he] finally got a chance” to do so.[8] Though Ahn Joon-ho is a Corporal in the webtoon, Han wanted him to be a Private in the series so people could “resonate with the story and consider Joon-ho as a friend who just started his military service.”[9]

Casting[edit]

On September 3, 2020, Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-Kyun, and Son Seok-Koo were confirmed to star in the series.[10][11] Koo’s character does not appear in the webtoon, which he found “hard but exciting to portray a character exclusive to the series.”[12] To prepare for his role, Koo received help from his road manager who was part of the D.P. team during his military service.[13] As for Jung, he practiced boxing for three months before filming began, to do his action scenes.[14]

Kim Bo-tong, who wrote the webtoon and co-wrote the series, commented that he “never dreamed of such a cast. They fit so perfectly into their roles that it seems like the roles were written for them.”[15]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography began in the summer of 2020.[16]

Reception[edit]

Audience viewership[edit]

Following its release, the series topped Netflix’s Top 10 in South Korea.[17]

Critical response[edit]

William Schwartz of Han Cinema praised Jung Hae-in‘s acting, commenting that he “is sublime here, in a brooding cinematic role radically different from the romances he’s better known for.” He added that “D.P. is worth watching, not just by people curious what South Korean mandatory military service is like, but anyone from any country who’s seriously thinking about joining up.”[18]

Pierce Conran of the South China Morning Post gave the series a 4.5/5 rating, noting that “D.P. hits home with a story that spans the past and present, as it acknowledges that yesterday’s problems can still be today’s.” He also praised the cinematography as well as Jung and Koo’s “electric chemistry”.[19] Daniel Hart of Ready Steady Cut also rated the series 4.5 stars out of 5, describing it as “the finest K-Drama mini-series this year.”[20]

Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek rated the series 4.3/5, noting that “D.P. is a stunning Korean drama [which] takes an unflinching look at bullying, the effect it has on mental health and larger societal questions about the mandatory military service in Korea” and praising the series for its “impressive” cinematography and for the way it “explore[s] a very sensitive and prevalent topic in a raw, artistic and unflinching way.”[21]

In a mixed review, Hitzig Jumaine of NME gave the series a 3/5 rating, commenting that “Kim Bo-tong and Han Jun-hee must be given credit for how this series tackles such extraordinarily difficult and tragic subject matter with compassion and sensitivity”, and praising the “uniformly excellent performances, splendid cinematography, addictive pacing, and intrepid commitment to shedding light on the appalling culture of bullying in the military”, but criticizing the “weak characterization [of the] three main leads” as well as the “ludicrous escalation of events during its climax, which suddenly turns a fairly grounded show into a melodramatic action thriller.”[22]

 

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

 

Squid Games

 

The top show on Netflix is not only in the US but also in Korea.  Reminiscent of both the “Maze”,  the “Hunger Games”, and the” Cube “ but done in a K Drama way. And addictive!

 

 

Squid Game

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Squid Game
Promotional poster
Also known as Round Six
Hangul 오징어게임
Revised Romanization Owing-ego Gem
McCune–Reischauer Jingo Kemi
Genre Actionadventure

Suspense

Survival

Drama

Created by Netflix
Written by Hwang Dong-hyuk
Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk
Starring Lee Jung-Jae

Park Hae-soo

Wi Ha-joon

Composer Jung Jae-il
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 9 (list of episodes)
Production
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 32–63 minutes
Production company Siren Pictures Inc.[1]
Distributor Netflix
Release
Original network Netflix
Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

Dolby visión

Audio format Dolby Atmos
Original release September 17, 2021

Squid Game (Korean: 오징어게임; RR: Jingle Gem) is a South Korean survival drama streaming television series written and directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk. The nine-episode series, starring Lee Jung-JaePark Hae-soo, and Wi Ha-Joon, tells the story of a group of people who risk their lives in a mysterious survival game with a 45.6 billion (US$38.7 million) prize.[2][3] It was released worldwide on September 17, 2021, by Netflix.[4][5]

Premise

Four hundred and fifty-six people, who have all struggled financially in life, are invited to play a mysterious survival competition. Competing in a series of traditional children’s games but with deadly twists, they risk their lives to compete for a 45.6 billion (US$38.5 million) prize.

Cast and characters

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Players

Main characters[6]

Lee Jung-Jae as Seong Gi-Hun (No. 456)[7]

A chauffeur and a gambling addict, he lives with his mother and struggles to financially support his daughter. He participates in the Game to settle his many debts.

Park Hae-soo as Cho Sang-woo (No. 218)

The head of the investment team at a securities company, he was a junior to Gi-Hun, and was a gifted student who entered Seoul National University, but is now wanted by the police for stealing money from his clients.

Oh Yeong-su as Oh Il-name (No. 001)

An elderly man with a brain tumor prefers playing the Game to waiting to die on the outside.

Hyeon Jung as Kang Sae-beak (No. 067)

North Korean defector enters the Game to pay for a broker that can find and retrieve her surviving family members from the country.

Heo Sung-tea as Jang Deok-su (No. 101)

A gangster enters the Game to settle his massive gambling debts.

Anupam Tripathi as Abdul Ali (No. 199)

A foreign worker from Pakistan enters the Game to provide for his young family after his employer refuses to pay him for months.

Kim Joo-young as Han Mi-no (No. 212)

A mysterious and manipulative woman who claims to be a poor single mother.[8]

Supporting characters

Yoo Sung-joo as Byeong-gi (No. 111)

A doctor secretly works with a group of corrupt guards trafficking dead participants’ organs in exchange for information on upcoming games.

Lee Yoo-mi as Ji-Yeong (No. 240)

A young woman was just released from prison after killing her abusive father.

Kim Si-Hyun as No. 244

A pastor who finds his faith again in the Game.

Minor characters

Lee Sang-hee as No. 017

A glass-maker with more than 30 years’ experience.

Kim Yun-tea as No. 069

A player who joins the Game with his wife, No. 070

Lee Ji-ha as No. 070

A player who joins the game with her husband, No. 069

Kwak Ja-young as No. 278

A player who joins Deok-sun’s group and acts as his henchman.

Chris Chan / Chris Lag hit[9] as No. 276

A player who joins Seong Gi-Hun’s group on the Tug of War round.

Game staff

Gong Yoo is a salesman who recruits participants for the Game (Special appearance, Episodes 1 and 9)[10]

Lee Byung-Hun as The Front Man (Special appearance, Episodes 8–9)

Civilians

Main characters

Wi Ha-joon as Hwang Jun-ho[11]

A police officer sneaks into the Game to find his missing brother.

Supporting characters

Kim Young-ok as Gi-Hun’s mother

Cho Ah-in as Seong Ga-Yeong, Gi-Hun’s daughter

Kang Mal-gum as Gi-Hun’s ex-wife and Ga-Yeong’s mother

Park Hye-jin as Sang-woo’s mother

Park Si-wan as Kang Cheol, Sae-book’s brother

English cast (dubbing)

Greg Chun as Seong Gi-Hun

Stephen Fu as Cho Sang-woo

Paul Nakache as Jang Deok-su

Hideo Kimura as Oh Il-name

Vivian Lu as Kang Sae-beak

Rama Valéry as Abdul Ali

Tom Choi as Front Man

Donald Chang as Hwang Jun-ho

Stephanie Komura as Han Mi-no

Yuki Luna as Ji-yeong

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

 

Move to Heaven is a heart-wrenching drama about a “Rain man” like character who worked with his father in a trauma clean-up business cleaning up after the recently deceased.  His father dies and his father’s deadbeat brother shows up as his guardian.

 

Move to Heaven (Korean: 무브 투 헤븐: 나는 유품정리사입니다; RR: Mubeen to hereon: Naneun yupumjeongnisaimnida) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Kim Sung-ho and written by Yoon Ji-rye on. It is an original Netflix series, starring Lee Je-hoonTang Joon-sangJi Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee. The series follows Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), a young man with Asperger syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), his guardian. Working as trauma cleaners, they uncover untold stories.[1][2] The series was released worldwide by Netflix on May 14, 2021.[3]

 

 

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

Another K Drama I liked was “Mad About You”.

The acting was first-rate, the storyline intriguing, and covers some contemporary issues including adultery, cyberbullying, and the like.

“About two people with their own painful stories who go through a complicated process of hurting and healing while falling in love with each other. No HI Oh is a detective in the violent crimes division of the Gangnam Police Station. He thinks that he is doing well until his life suddenly takes a turn and he becomes a “crazy” person who can’t hold in his anger about anything. Lee Min Kyung is a woman who is caught up in her delusions and compulsions. She had lived an ordinary life as a pretty woman with a respectable job until “that incident” caused everything in her life to break down. As a result, she was unable to trust anyone and is caught in a prison of her own making. Her delusions also have the unfortunate side effect of making everyone else around her angry. (Source: Suomi)”

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

 

Heist – not a K Drama, more of an S Drama but pretty good, but went on too long.  Should have ended with the first season.  There were lots of unanswered questions –

 

Who is behind the Professor?  Obviously could not have pulled it off himself. There are hints that he is connected to shadowy and Serbian forces and has some inside info from the police and security forces.

 

The politics got a bit too left-wing conspiracy for my taste as well.

 

Money Heist

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Money Heist
Spanish La casa de papal
Genre Crime drama[1]

Heist[2]

Thriller[3]

Created by Alex Pina
Starring Úrsula Corbera

Álvaro Morte

Itziar Ituño

Pedro Alonso

Paco Tous

Alba Flores

Miguel Herrán

Jaime Lorente

Esther Acebo

Enrique Arce

María Pedraza

Darlo Peri

Kita Máncer

Ovil Keuchkerian

Luka peros

Belén Cuesta

Fernando Cayo

Rodrigo de la Serna

Najwa Nimr

Theme music composer Manel Santisteban
Opening theme My Life Is Going On” by Cecilia Krull
Composers Manel Santisteban

Iván Martínez La cámara

Country of origin Spain
Original language Spanish
No. of seasons 3 (5 parts)[a]
No. of episodes 36 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers Álex Pina

Sonia Martínez

Jesús Colmenar

Esther Martínez Lobato

Nacho Manaban

Production locations Spain

Italy

Thailand

Panama

Denmark

Portugal

Cinematography Miguel Amodeo
Editors David Pelegrín

Luis Miguel González Bedmar

Verónica Callón

Raúl Mora

Regino Hernández

Raquel Maraca

Patricia Rubio

Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 67–77 minutes (Antenna 3)
41–61 minutes (Netflix)
Production companies Transmedia

Vancouver Media

Distributor Antenna 3 Televisión

Netflix

Release
Original network Antenna 3 (2017)

Netflix (2019–present)

Picture format 1080p (16:9 HDTV)

4K (Ultra HD) (16:9 UHDTV)

Dolby Vision

Audio format Dolby Atmos
Original release 2 May 2017 –
present
External links
Website

Money Heist (Spanish: La casa de papal, “The House of Paper”) is a Spanish heist crime drama television series created by Alex. The series traces two long-prepared heists led by the Professor (Álvaro Morten), one on the Royal Mint of Spain, and one on the Bank of Spain told from the perspective of one of the robbers, Tokyo (Ursula). The narrative is told in a real-time-like fashion and relies on flashbacks, time-jumps, hidden character motivations, and an unreliable narrator for complexity.

The series was initially intended as a limited series to be told in two parts. It had its original run of 15 episodes on Spanish network Antena 3 from 2 May 2017 through 23 November 2017. Netflix acquired global streaming rights in late 2017. It re-cut the series into 22 shorter episodes and released them worldwide, beginning with the first part on 20 December 2017, followed by the second part on 6 April 2018. In April 2018, Netflix renewed the series with a significantly increased budget for 16 new episodes total. Part 3, with eight episodes, was released on 19 July 2019. Part 4, also with eight episodes, was released on 3 April 2020. A documentary involving the producers and the cast premiered on Netflix the same day, titled Money Heist: The Phenomenon (Spanish: La casa de papal: El Fennomen). In July 2020, Netflix renewed the show for a fifth and final part, which would be released in two five-episode volumes on 3 September and 3 December 2021, respectively. The series was filmed in Madrid, Spain. Significant portions were also filmed in PanamaThailandItaly (Florence), Denmark, and Portugal.

The series received several awards including the International Emmy Award for Best Drama Series at the 46th International Emmy Awards, as well as critical acclaim for its sophisticated plot, interpersonal dramas, direction, and for trying to innovate Spanish television. The Italian anti-fascist song “Bella ciao“, which plays multiple times throughout the series, became a summer hit across Europe in 2018. By 2018, the series was the most-watched non-English-language series and one of the most-watched series overall on Netflix,[4] having particular resonance with viewers from Mediterranean Europe and the Latin American regions.

Premise[edit]

Set in Madrid, a mysterious man known as “The Professor” recruits a group of eight people, who choose city names as their aliases, to carry out an ambitious plan that involves entering the Royal Mint of Spain, and escaping with €984 million. After taking 67 people hostage inside the Mint, the team plans to remain inside for 11 days to print the money as they deal with elite police forces. In the events following the initial heist, the group’s members are forced out of hiding and prepare for a second heist, this time on the Bank of Spain, as they again deal with hostages and police forces.

Cast and characters[edit]

See also: List of Money Heist cast members

Main[edit]

Ursula Cordero as Silene Oliveira (Tokyo): a runaway turned robber who is scouted by the Professor, then joins his group and participates in his plans. She also acts as an unreliable narrator.

Álvaro Morten as Sergio Marquita (The Professor) / Salvador “Salva” Martin: the mastermind of the heist who assembled the group, and Berlin’s younger brother

Ritzier Ikuno as Raquel Murillo (Lisbon): an inspector of the National Police Corps who is put in charge of the case until she joins the group in part 3

Pedro Alonso as Andrés de Foolscap (Berlin): a terminally ill jewel thief and the Professor’s second-in-command and older brother

Paco Tous as Agustin Ramos (Moscow) (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–5): a former miner turned criminal and Denver’s father

Alba Flores as Ágata Jiménez (Nairobi) (parts 1-4; featured part 5): an expert in counterfeiting and forgery, in charge of printing the money and oversaw the melting of gold

Miguel Herren as Anibal Cortés (Rio): a young hacker who later becomes Tokyo’s boyfriend

Jaime Lorene as Ricardo / Daniel[b] Ramos (Denver): Moscow’s son who joins him in the heist

Esther Acerbo as Mónica Ketamide (Stockholm): one of the hostages who is Arturo Román’s secretary and mistress, carrying his child out of wedlock; during the robbery, she falls in love with Denver and becomes an accomplice to the group

Enrique Arce as Arturo Román: a hostage and the former Director of the Royal Mint of Spain

María Pedraza as Alison Parker (parts 1–2): a hostage and daughter of the British ambassador to Spain

Darko Peri as Mirko Dragic (Helsinki): a veteran Serbian soldier and Oslo’s cousin

Kite Manger as Marivic Fuentes (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): Raquel’s mother

Horik Kircherian as Bogotá (parts 3–present): an expert in metallurgy who joins the robbery of the Bank of Spain

Luka Pero’s as Jakob (Marseille; part 4–present; featured part 3): a member of the gang who joins the robbery of the Bank of Spain and serves as a liaison for the group.

Belen Cuesta as Julia (Manila; part 4–present; featured part 3): godchild of Moscow and Denver’s childhood friend, now a trans woman, who joins the gang and poses as one of the hostages during the robbery of the Bank of Spain

Fernando Kayo as Colonel Luis Tamayo (part 4–present; featured part 3): a member of the Spanish Intelligence who oversees Alicia’s work on the case

Rodrigo de la Serna as Martín Berate (Palermo / The Engineer; parts 3–present): an old Argentine friend of Berlin who planned the robbery of the Bank of Spain with him and assumed his place as commanding officer

Najwa Nimr as Alicia Sierra (parts 3–present): a pregnant inspector of the National Police Corps put in charge of the case after Raquel departed from the force

Recurring[edit]

Roberto García Ruiz as Dimitri Most’ve / Radka Dragic[c] (Oslo; parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): a veteran Serbian soldier and Helsinki’s cousin

Fernando Soto as Angel Rubio (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–5): a deputy inspector and Raquel’s second-in-command

Juan Fernández as Colonel Luis Prieto (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): a member of the Spanish Intelligence who oversees Raquel’s work on the case

Anna Gras as Mercedes Colmenar (parts 1–2): Alison’s teacher and one of the hostages

Fran Morcilla as Pablo Ruiz (part 1): Alison’s schoolmate and one of the hostages

Clara Alvarado as Ariadne Cascades (parts 1–2): one of the hostages who works in the Mint

Mario de la Rosa as Suárez: the chef o the Grupo Especial de Operaciones

Miquel García Board as Alberto Vicuña (parts 1–2; featured part 4): Raquel’s ex-husband and a forensic examiner

NAIA Gus as Paula Vicuña Murillo (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): Raquel and Alberto’s daughter

José Manuel Pogan as César Gandía (parts 4–5; featured part 3): chief of security for the Bank of Spain who escapes from hostage and causes havoc for the group

Antonio Romero as Benito Antonina’s (parts 3–5): an assistant to Colonel Luis Tamayo, who is persuaded by the Professor to do tasks for him

Diana Gómez as Tatiana (featured parts 3–5): the fifth ex-wife of Berlin who is a professional pianist and thief

Pep Munn as Mario Urbana (featured parts 3–5): the governor of the Bank of Spain

Olalla Hernández as Amanda (featured parts 3–5): a hostage that Arturo rapes

Mari Carmen Sánchez as Paquito (featured parts 3–5): a hostage and a nurse who tends to Nairobi while she recovers

Carlos Suárez as Miguel Fernández (featured parts 3–5): a nervous hostage

Adhikari Alcona as Matias Cano (featured parts 3–5): a member of the group who largely guards the hostages

Ramón Aguirre as Benjamín (featured parts 4–5): father of Manila who aids the Professor in his plan

Antonio García Ferrers as himself (featured parts 4–5): a journalist

Patrick Cried as Rafael (featured part 5): Berlin’s son

Alberto Amarilla as Ramiro (parte 5)

Miguel Angel Silvestre (featured part 5): René, Tokyo’s boyfriend before working with the Professor

José Manuel Seda as Segesta (part 5): leader of the army detail inside the bank

Production[edit]

Conception and writing[edit]

Further information: § Themes and analysis

We wanted to make a very small project simply; we wanted to cross lines we couldn’t cross in previous projects, in terms of narrative and structure without any intermediaries.

—Writer Esther Martinez Lobato, October 2018[11]

The series was conceived by screenwriter Alex and director Jesús Colmenar during their years of collaboration since 2008.[12] After finishing their work on the Spanish prison drama Locked Up (Vis a vis), they left Globo media to set up their own production company, named Vancouver Media, in 2016.[12][13] For their first project, they considered either filming a comedy or developing a heist story for television,[12] with the latter having never been attempted before on Spanish television.[14] Along with former Locked Up colleagues,[d] they developed Money Heist as a passion project to try new things without outside interference.[11] Pina was firm about making it a limited series, feeling that dilution had become a problem for his previous productions.[15]

Initially entitled Los Desharious (The Evicted) in the conception phase,[15] the series was developed to subvert heist conventions and combine elements of the action genrethrillers, and surrealism, while still being credible.[12] Pina saw an advantage over typical heist films in that character development could span a considerably longer narrative arc.[16] Characters were to be shown from multiple sides to break the viewers’ preconceptions of villainy and retain their interest throughout the show.[16] Key aspects of the planned storyline were written down at the beginning,[17] while the finer story beats were developed incrementally to not overwhelm the writers.[18] Writer Javier Gómez Santander compared the writing process to the Professor’s way of thinking, “going around, writing down options, consulting engineers whom you cannot tell why you ask them that,” but noted that fiction allowed the police to be written dumber when necessary.[18]

The beginning of filming was set for January 2017,[14] allowing for five months of pre-production.[19] The narrative was split into two parts for financial considerations.[19] The robbers’ city-based code names, which Spanish newspaper ABC compared to the color-based code names in Quentin Tarantino‘s 1992 heist film Reservoir Dogs,[20] were chosen at random in the first part,[21] although places with high viewership resonance were also taken into account for the new robbers’ code names in part 3.[22] The first five lines of the pilot script took a month to write,[19] as the writers were unable to make the Professor or Moscow work as a narrator.[15] Tokyo as an unreliable narrator, flashbacks, and time-jumps increased the narrative complexity,[16] but also made the story more fluid for the audience.[19] The pilot episode required over 50 script versions until the producers were satisfied.[23][24] Later scripts would be finished once per week to keep up with filming.[19]

Casting[edit]

Casting took place late in 2016, spanning more than two months.[25] The characters were not fully fleshed out at the beginning of this process and took shape based on the actors’ performances.[26] Casting directors Eva Leora and Yolanda Serrano were looking for actors with the ability to play empathetic robbers with believable love and family connections.[27] Antenna 3 announced the ensemble cast in March 2017[3] and released audition excerpts of most cast actors in the series’ after show Terser Grado and on their website.[26]

The Professor was designed as a charismatic yet shy villain who could convince the robbers to follow him and make the audience sympathetic to the robbers’ resistance against the powerful banks.[28] However, developing the Professor’s role proved difficult, as the character did not follow archetypal conventions[25] and the producers were uncertain about his degree of brilliance.[15] While the producers found his Salva personality early on,[15] they were originally looking for a 50-year-old Harvard professor type with the looks of Spanish actor José Coronado.[15][29] The role was proposed to Javier Gutiérrez, but he was already committed to starring in the film Campeones.[30] Meanwhile, the casting directors advocated for Álvaro Morten, whom they knew from their collaboration on the long-running Spanish soap opera El Secretor de Puente Viejo, even though his prime-time television experience was limited at that point.[29] Going through the full casting process and approaching the role through external analysis rather than personal experience, Morten described the professor as “a tremendous box of surprises” that “end up shaping this character because he never ceases to generate uncertainty,” making it unclear for the audience if the character is good or bad.[25] The producers also found that his appearance as a primary school teacher gave the character more credibility.[15]

Pedro Alonso was cast to play Berlin, whom La Vos de Galicia would later characterize as a “cold, hypnotic, sophisticated and disturbing character, an inveterate macho with serious empathy problems, a white-collar thief who despises his colleagues and considers them inferior.”[31] The actor’s portrayal of the character was inspired by a chance encounter Alonso had the day before receiving his audition script, with “an intelligent person” who was “provocative or even manipulative” to him.[32] Alonso saw high observation skills and an unusual understanding of his surroundings in Berlin, resulting in unconventional and unpredictable character behavior.[31] Similarities between Berlin and Nimr’s character Zulema in Pina’s TV series Locked Up were unintentional.[33] The family connection between the Professor and Berlin was not in the original script but was built into the characters’ backstory at the end of part 1 after Morten and Alonso had repeatedly proposed to do so.[34]

The producers found the protagonist and narrator, Tokyo, among the hardest characters to develop,[19] as they were originally looking for an older actress to play the character who had nothing to lose before meeting the Professor.[26] Ursula Cordero eventually landed the role for bringing playful energy to the table; her voice was heavily factored in during casting, as she was the first voice the audience hears in the show.[26] Jaime Lorene developed Denver’s hallmark laughter during the casting process.[26] Two cast actors had appeared in previous TV series by Alex Pina: Paco Tous (Moscow) had starred in the 2005 TV series Los hombres de Paco, and Alba Flores (Nairobi) had starred in Locked Up. Flores was asked to play Nairobi without audition when Pina realized late in the conception phase that the show needed another female gang member.[15] For the role opposite to the robbers, strop was cast to play Inspector Raquel Murillo, whom Ikuno described as a “strong and powerful woman in a world of men, but also sensitive in her private life”.[35] She took inspiration from The Silence of the Lambs character Clarice Starling, an FBI student with a messy family life who develops sympathies for a criminal.[36]

The actors learned of the show’s renewal by Netflix before the producers contacted them to return.[37] In October 2018, Netflix announced the cast of part 3; the returning main cast included Pedro Alonso, raising speculation about his role in part 3.[38] Among the new cast members were Argentine actor Rodrigo de la Serna, who saw a possible connection between his character’s name and the Argentine football legend Martín Palermo,[39] and Locked Up star Najwa Nimr. Cameo scenes of Brazilian football star, and fan of the series, Neymar, as a monk were filmed for part 3, but were excluded from the stream without repercussions to the narrative until judicial charges against him had been dropped in late August 2019.[40][18] A small appearance by Spanish actress Belen in two episodes of part 3 raised fan and media speculation about her role in part 4.[41]

Design[edit]

Spanish Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was chosen as the heist team’s mask design.

The show’s look and atmosphere were developed by creator Alex Pina, director Jesús Colmenar, and director of photography Miguel Amodeo, according to La Vanguard “the most prolific television trio in recent years”.[42] Abdon Alaniz served as art director.[43] Their collaboration projects usually take a primary color as a basis;[43] Money Heist had red as “one of the distinguishing features of the series”[44] that stood over the gray sets.[45] Blue, green and yellow were marked as forbidden colors in production design.[45] To achieve “absolute film quality”, red tones were tested with different types of fabrics, textures, and lighting.[46] The iconography of the robbers’ red jumpsuits mirrored the yellow prison dress code in Locked Up.[44] For part 3, the Italian retail clothing company Diesel modified the red jumpsuits to better fit the body and launched a clothing line inspired by the series.[45] Salvador Dalí was chosen as the robbers’ mask design because of Dalí’s recognizable visage that also serves as an iconic cultural reference to Spain; Don Quixote as an alternative mask design was discarded.[47] This choice sparked criticism by the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation for not requesting the necessary permissions.[27]

To make the plot more realistic, the producers requested and received advice from the national police and the Spanish Ministry of Interior.[48][49] The robbers’ banknotes were printed with permission of the Bank of Spain and had an increased size as an anti-counterfeit measure.[48] The greater financial backing of Netflix for part 3 allowed for the build of over 50 sets across five basic filming locations worldwide.[50] Preparing a remote and uninhabited island in Panama to represent a robber hide-out proved difficult, as it needed to be cleaned, secured, and built on, and involved hours-long traveling with material transportation.[46] The real Bank of Spain was unavailable for visiting and filming for security reasons, so the producers recreated the Bank on a two-level stage by their imagining, taking inspiration from Spanish architecture of the Francisco Franco era.[46] Publicly available information was used to make the Bank’s main hall set similar to the reallocation. The other interior sets were inspired by different periods and artificially aged to accentuate the building’s history.[50] Bronze and granite sculptures and motifs from the Valle de Los Ciaos were recreated for the interior,[46] and over 50 paintings were painted for the Bank to emulate the Ateneo de Madrid.[50]

Filming[edit]

The Spanish National Research Council headquarters, the principal filming location of parts 1 and 2 of Money Heist

The Nuevo’s, the principal filming location of part 3 of Money Heist

Parts 1 and 2 were filmed back-to-back in the greater Madrid region from January until August 2017.[23][25][51] The pilot episode was recorded in 26 days,[48] while all other episodes had around 14 filming days.[16] Production was split into two units to save time, with one unit shooting scenes involving the Professor and the police, and the other filming scenes with the robbers.[19] The main storyline is set in the Royal Mint of Spain in Madrid, but the exterior scenes were filmed at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) headquarters for its passing resemblance to the Mint,[48] and on the roof of the Higher Technical School of Aeronautical Engineers, part of the Technical University of Madrid.[51] The hunting estate where the robbers plan their coup was filmed at the Finca El Gascon farm estate in Terrebonne.[51] Interior filming took place at the former Locked Upsets in Colmenar Viejo[13] and the Spanish national daily newspaper ABC in Torreon for printing press scenes.[23] As the show was designed as a limited series, all sets were destroyed once the production of part 2 had finished.[19]

Parts 3 and 4 were also filmed back-to-back,[52] with 21 to 23 filming days per episode.[16] Netflix announced the start of filming on 25 October 2018,[28] and filming of part 4 ended in August 2019.[53] In 2018, Netflix had opened their first European production hub in Tres Cantos near Madrid for new and existing Netflix productions;[54] the main filming moved there onto a set three times the size of the set used for parts 1 and 2.[55] The main storyline is set in the Bank of Spain in Madrid, but the exterior was filmed at the Ministry of Development complex Nuevos Minister iOS.[55] A scene where money is dropped from the sky was filmed at Callao Square.[51] Ermita de San Fritos in Car rascal served as the exterior of the Italian monastery where the robbers plan the heist.[45] The motorhome scenes of the Professor and Lisbon were filmed at the deserted Las Salinas beaches in Almería to make the audience feel that the characters are safe from the police although their exact location is undisclosed at first.[56] Underwater scenes inside the vault were filmed at Pinewood Studios in the United Kingdom.[22][57] The beginning of part 3 was also filmed in Thailand, on the Guna Yale islands in Panama, and in Florence, Italy,[46] which helped to counter the claustrophobic feeling of the first two parts,[16] but was also an expression of the plot’s global repercussions.[58] Filming for the fifth and final season concluded on 14 May 2021.[59]

Music[edit]

Main article: Money Heist (soundtrack)

The series theme song, “My Life Is Going On,” was composed by Manel Santisteban, who also served as composer on Locked Up. Santisteban approached Spanish singer, Cecilia Krull, to write and perform the lyrics, which are about having confidence in one’s abilities and the future.[60] The theme song is played behind a title sequence featuring paper models of major settings from the series.[60] Krull’s main source of inspiration was the character Tokyo in the first episode of the series when the Professor offers her a way out of a desperate moment.[61] The lyrics are in English as the language that came naturally to Krull at the time of writing.[61]

The Italian anti-fascist song “Bella ciao” plays multiple times throughout the series and accompanies two emblematic key scenes: at the end of the first part the Professor and Berlin sing it in preparation for the heist, embracing themselves as resistance against the establishment,[62] and in the second part it plays during the thieves’ escape from the Mint, as a metaphor for freedom.[63] Regarding the use of the song, Tokyo recounts in one of her narrations, “The life of the Professor revolved around a single idea: Resistance. His grandfather, who had fought against the fascists in Italy, taught him the song, and he taught us.”[63] The song was brought to the show by writer Javier Gómez Santander. He had listened to “Bella ciao” at home to cheer him up, as he had grown frustrated for not finding a suitable song for the middle of part 1.[18] He was aware of the song’s meaning and history and felt it represented positive values.[18] “Bella ciao” became a summer hit in Europe in 2018, mostly due to the popularity of the series and not the song’s grave themes.[

 

Move to Heaven

 

Synopsis[edit]

Move to Heaven is inspired by the essay “Things Left Behind” by Kim Sae-buy, a former “trauma cleaner”. Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), who has Asperger syndrome, and his ex-convict uncle Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon) meet for the first time after the sudden death of Geu-ru’s father. Entrusted as Geu-ru’s guardian, Sang-gu joins his nephew to help run the family trauma cleaning company “Move to Heaven”, wherein the course of business they uncover untold stories about the deceased while Sang-gu tries to deal with his painful past with Geu-ru’s father as well as the traumatic incident that landed him in jail.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Lee Je-hoon is Cho Sang-gu,[4] an ex-convict and Geu-ru’s estranged uncle who becomes his guardian upon release from jail. He is blunt, smokes cigarettes, and moonlights as an underground MMA fighter. He was sent to jail after putting his protégé Su-Cheol into a coma during a fight. Despite his background, he is still entrusted to take care of Geu-ru after his release and is instructed to stay and work with Geu-ru for a three-month probationary period. Although he initially does so for financial gain and appears to be ignorant of Geu-ru’s condition, he slowly gets to know Geu-ru as they both work together as trauma cleaners for Move to Heaven, gaining a new outlook on life and allowing him to discover the truth about his half-brother and Geu-ru’s father Jeong-woo, who he believes had abandoned him when he was still very young.

Tang Joon-sang as Han Geu-ru,[5] a 20-year-old with Asperger syndrome who works as a trauma cleaner for Move to Heaven, over which he took following his father’s death. He is smart, has an incredible memory, and is extremely logical, abilities which he uses to uncover untold stories about the deceased through the collection of their important personal belongings. Following his father’s practice, Geu-ru places the deceased’s most important belongings in a yellow box, which he always insists on handing over to the next of kin; if they cannot be readily found or are unwilling to receive the box, Geu-ru always tries to find a way to pass it on regardless, often to Sang-gu’s consternation. Geu-ru also has a minor obsession with fish and marine life, since his parents regularly brought him to a giant aquarium as a child, and he continues to do so as an adult. When he feels panicked, Geu-ru recites facts about fish to calm himself. Despite his condition, there are a lot of people surrounding him who understand his situation and try their best to help him and make him feel comfortable.

Supporting[edit]

Ji Jin-hee is Han Jeong-woo, Geu-ru’s father, and Sang-gu’s older half-brother, who shares the same mother with him. He was the founder and owner of Move to Heaven before his sudden death from cardiac arrest. Previously a firefighter in Busan, he rescued an abandoned infant, whom he and his wife later adopted and named Geu-ru. After her passing, he taught Geu-ru everything about life and his job as a trauma cleaner but kept his heart condition secret from him. He also treated Sang-gu like his own brother, but after Sang-gu’s father died and Jeong-woo inadvertently abandoned him, they became estranged until Su-Cheol tried to reunite them at his last fight. Although Sang-gu refuses to see him when he tries to visit him in jail, Jeong-woo still entrusts his son’s future care to him.

Kim Ju-Yeon is Min Ji-won, Jeong-woo’s wife and Geu-ru’s mother, who died from cancer when he was a child.

Lee Moon-Sik is Park Joo-take, a waste disposal truck driver and a friend of Jeong-woo. He is a close partner of Move to Heaven who helps them collect the unusable garbage left by the deceased. A North Korean defector, he is amazed by Move to Heaven’s work and always prioritizes them when they need his service.

Im Won-hee as Oh Hyun-change, a lawyer, and a partner of Move to Heaven. He was assigned by Jeong-woo to contact Sang-gu when he got discharged from prison and explains to Geu-ru and Na-mu the guardianship arrangement with Sang-gu.

Hong Seung-hee as Yoon Na-mu,[6] Geu-ru’s best friend and neighbor who joins and helps him run Move to Heaven after she becomes suspicious of Sang-gu’s sudden presence in Geu-ru’s life. However, her mother disapproves of her working as a trauma cleaner, and she does so in secret. She has been fond and protective of Geu-ru since they first met when they were kids and is willing to take good care of him.

Hong Seok is Park Jun-Yeong,[7] a policeman and friend of Han Geu-ru and Yoon Na-mu. He is usually seen attending crime scenes where clean-up by Move to Heaven is required and is their first contact when the pair needs the help of the police. Like Na-mu, he understands Geu-ru’s condition and tries his best to help him. It is hinted that he has feelings toward Yoon Na-mu.

Jung Young-Joo as Oh Mi-ran, Na-mu’s mother. She runs a small takeaway shop, located against Move to Heaven, with her husband. She disapproves of both her daughter’s friendship with Geu-ru and her working for Move to Heaven.

Lee Jae-wook as Kim Su-cheol,[8] Sang-gu’s friend and protégé. 10 years ago, Sang-gu helped him out when he was beaten up by street thugs, inspiring Su-Cheol to become a fighter and eventually becoming a champion boxer himself. After several years, he told Sang-gu that he wanted to retire from boxing so he could start a new life running a supply shop with his father and sister. Unfortunately, he ended up being forced to participate in a rigged underground MMA fight against Sang-gu to get the money to do so. During the fight, after Su-Cheol refused to concede, Sang-gu violently knocked him out, putting him into a coma, and Sang-gu was sent to jail for it. Sang-gu visits a still-comatose Su-Cheol in hospital after his release, but he passes away soon after. Sang-gu later discovers Su-Cheol was suffering from CTE, which was his real reason for retirement.

Park Jung-Won is Kim Su-jin, Su-school’s younger sister.

Jung Ae-Youn as Madam Jung, an associate of Sang-gu and an underground MMA fight organizer. She organized the fight between him and Su-Cheol and, after his release from jail, persuades Sang-gu to continue fighting for her.

Choi Soo-young as Son Woo-rim,[9] a social worker who helps lonely citizens who don’t have any other family. She first crosses paths with Move to Heaven when they attend to the home of an elderly couple who have committed suicide together, and later contacts them to take care of Matthew Green’s belongings. Sang-gu appears to have a crush on her.

Guest appearance[edit]

Shin Soo-oh as Kim Yong-woo,[10] a murder suspect. (Episode 4)

Yoon Ji-Hye as Lee Ju-Yeong, a public prosecutor. (Episode 4, 10)

Kwon Soo-Hyun as Soo-Hyun,[11] a doctor. (Episode 5)

Lee Ki-young is Soo-Hyun’s father, a decorated military officer. (Episode 5)

Jung Dong-hwan is Kim In-su, an elderly man who commits suicide alongside his wife. (Episode 6)

Yoon Joo-sang as Chairman No (episode 6)

Yoo Sun is Kang Eun-Jeong, a newscaster. When she was a teenager, her parents fostered Korean children who were to be adopted by overseas couples. (Episode 9)

Kevin Oh as Matthew Green, a deportee from the United States looking for his birth mother, whom he believes to be Kang Eun-Jeong. His birth name is Kang Seong-min. (episode 9)

Lee Re as “butterfly girl”[12] (episode 10)

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

In September 2019, it was reported that Kim Sung-ho would direct a series for Netflix, the story of which is inspired by an essay “Things Left Behind” by Kim Sae-buy, a former “trauma cleaner”.[13]

Casting[edit]

On 17 December 2019, Netflix confirmed the lead casting of Lee Je-hoon and Tang Jun-sang for the series.[5] On June 3, 2020, Netflix confirmed that Ji Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee are to join the cast of the series.[1]

Filming[edit]

As the infection due to the COVID-19 pandemic was reported, the production of Move to Heaven, along with other Netflix original dramas, was stopped in late August 2020.[14] On February 25, 2021, Netflix announced its plans and timeline for forthcoming projects including Move to Heaven.[15] On February 25, 2021, new stills from the TV series were released.[16]

Release[edit]

The series was released on Netflix on May 14, 2021. All 10 episodes, each with a running time of around 45 to 60 minutes, are available for streaming. It became the 11th South Korean Netflix original series released on Netflix.[17]

Reception[edit]

Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek, rating the series 9 out of 10, opined that the series is a beautiful message conveyed through unique characters. Wheeler praised the performance of Tang Jun-sang, writing “Tang Joon-Snag’s acting is nothing short of extraordinary…” He also praised the soundtrack and wrote that it was “absolutely on-point.” In summary, he said, “With excellent acting, tightly written chapters and a careful, respectful and empowering view on death, Move to Heaven is a cleverly written and unique Korean drama”, and concluded by saying that the show was an “…absolute must-watch this year. Just be sure to have a pack of tissues ready to catch those tears!”.[18] Rhian Daly of NME also praised the series, awarding it 5 out of 5 stars, and called it a contender for one of 2021’s best shows.[19]

 

 

Mr. Kim’s convenience

 

Kim’s Convenience

cbc.ca/Kim’s convenience

Kim’s Convenience is a Canadian television sitcom that premiered on CBC Television in October 2016. It depicts the Korean Canadian Kim family that runs a convenience store in the Moss Park neighborhood of Toronto: parents “Papa” and “Umma” – Korean for dad and mom, respectively – along with their daughter Janet and estranged son Jung. Wikipedia

Developed by: Ins Choi, Kevin White

Starring: Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, Jean Yoon, Andrea Bang, Simu Liu, Andrew Phung, Nicole Power

Country of origin: Canada

 

Comment:

Not exactly a typical K drama.  It takes place in Canada and depicts the life of a Korean immigrant family running a convenience store in Toronto.  Well, done. Good acting, and storylines.

End comment

Yet to Watch

 

Minuri Movie

 

Minami (Korean: 미나리 [mina], transl. ”water celery“) is a 2020 American drama film written and directed by Lee Isaac Chung. It stars Steven YuenHan Ye-riAlan Kim, Noel Kate Cho, Youn Yoh-Jung, and Will Patton. A semi-autobiographical take on Chung’s upbringing, the plot follows a family of South Korean immigrants who try to make it in the rural United States during the 1980s.[6]

Minami had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 26, 2020, winning both the U.S. Dramatic Grand Jury Prize and the U.S. Dramatic Audience Award.[7] It began a one-week virtual release on December 11, 2020, and was released theatrically and via virtual cinema on February 12, 2021, by A24.

The film received critical acclaim, with many declaring it one of the best films of 2020. It earned six nominations at the 93rd Academy AwardsBest PictureBest DirectorBest Original ScoreBest Original ScreenplayBest Actor (Yuen), and Best Supporting Actress (Youn), with Youn winning for her performance, making her the first Korean to win an Academy Award for acting. It also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, was nominated for the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture, and earned six nominations at the 74th British Academy Film Awards, including Best Film Not in the English Language.

Plot[edit]

In 1983, the Korean immigrant Yi family moves from California to their new plot of land in rural Arkansas, where Father Jacob hopes to grow Korean produce to sell to vendors in Dallas. One of his first decisions is to decline the services of a water diviner and he digs a well in a spot he finds on his own. He enlists the help of Paul, an eccentric local man, and Korean War veteran. While Jacob is optimistic about the life ahead, his wife Monica is disappointed and worries about their son David’s heart condition; he is frequently told not to run due to this. Jacob and Monica work sexing chicks at the nearby hatchery and argue constantly while David and his sister Anne eavesdrop.

To help watch the children during the day, they arrange for Monica’s mother Soon-JA to travel from South Korea. David, who is forced to share a room with her, avoids her because she does not conform to his idea of how a grandmother should be. Still, Soon-ja attempts to adjust to life in the States and bond with the children. The well that Jacob dug runs dry. Jacob is reluctant to pay for county water but eventually is forced to do so. He runs into additional difficulties, such as the vendor in Dallas canceling their order at the last minute. Even so, he perseveres despite Monica’s vocal desire to return to California. This brings their marriage closer to the breaking point.

Meanwhile, Soon-JA takes David to plant Minami seeds by the creek. She tells them how resilient and useful the plant is, and predicts plentiful growth. David finally begins to warm to his grandmother after she teaches him Hanabusa, bandages his wounds, and soothes him to sleep. Soon-ja also encourages him to do more physical activity, something his parents discourage, but she says that he is stronger than they think. Soon-ja suddenly suffers a stroke overnight. She survives with medical treatment but is left with impaired movement and speech.

Jacob, Monica, Anne, and David head to Oklahoma City for David’s heart appointment and to meet a vendor to sell Jacob’s produce. Although they learn that David’s heart condition has dramatically improved and Jacob makes a deal to sell vegetables to a Korean grocer, Jacob also indirectly admits to Monica that the success of his crops is more important to him than the stability of their family. Following an emotional argument, the two tacitly agree to separate.

However, Soon-ja accidentally sets the barn containing the produce on fire in their absence. Upon arriving home, Jacob rushes in to save the crops, and Monica soon follows. Eventually, the fire grows out of control, and they decide to save each other while leaving the barn to burn. A distraught and confused Soon-ja begins to wander off into the distance, as Anne and David call for her to come back. Seeing that she is not responding to them, David breaks into a sprint to meet her, blocking her path. Soon-ja seems to recognize David for a moment and reaches for his hand and the grandchildren lead her back home. The family is asleep on the floor, collapsed from the fatigue of the night before. Above them, Soon-ja is awake, in a chair, watching them sleep with a subdued expression.

Sometime later, Jacob and Monica are with the water diviner who finds a spot for a well. They mark it with a stone signifying their intention to stay on the farm. Jacob and David then head to the creek to harvest the minaret, which had grown successfully, with Jacob noting how good a spot Soon-ja had picked to plant them.

Cast[edit]

Steven Yuen as Jacob Yi

Han Ye-ri as Monica Yi

Alan Kim as David Yi

Noel Kate Cho as Anne Yi (Ji-young, Korean: 지영)

Youn Yoh-jung as Soon-ja (Korean: 순자)

Will Patton as Paul

Scott Haze as Billy

Jacob Wade as Johnnie

 

Comment: Won best supporting actress Oscar.

End comment

 

Sky Castle

Sky Castle (Korean: SKY 캐슬; RR: SKY Kassel; stylized as SKY Castle[a]) is a 2018–2019 South Korean television series starring Yum Jung-ahLee Tae-ranYoon Se-ahOh Na-ra and Kim Seo-Hyung. It aired on JTBC on Fridays and Saturdays, from November 23, 2018, to February 1, 2019.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Sky Castle is the second-highest-rated drama in Korean cable television history.[10] The drama received positive reviews from critics and won multiple awards, including four at the 55th Buesking Arts Awards.

Synopsis[edit]

A satirical series that closely looks at the materialistic desires of the upper-class parents in South Korea and how they ruthlessly secure the successes of their families at the cost of destroying others’ lives. The drama revolves around the lives of housewives residing in a luxurious residential area called SKY Castle in suburban Seoul, where wealthy doctors and professors live. The wives are determined to make their husbands more successful and to raise their children to be top students,[5] who will be accepted at the best universities, so they use every possible way to get that.[11]

Han Seo-jin (Yum Jung-ah) is married to an ambitious doctor, Kang Joon-sang (Jung Joon-ho). She wants her eldest daughter, Kang Ye-seo (Kim Hye-Joon), to also become a doctor. To do that, she hires Kim Joo-young (Kim Seo-Hyung), a coordinator with a one hundred percent success rate when it comes to her students’ admission to the Seoul National University.

No Seung-Hye (Yoon Se-ah) is the wife of Cha Min-hyuk (Kim Byung-Chula), a perfectionist law professor. She does not like the way her husband teaches their twin sons, Cha Seo-Joon (Kim Dong-hee) and Cha Ki-Joon (Jo Byeong-kyu). Later it is revealed that their daughter, Cha Se-ri (Park Yoo-Na), who has always been Min-Hyun’s pride since she attends Harvard University, hides something from them.

Jin Jin-hee (Oh Na-ra) is the mother of Woo Soo-Han (Lee Eugene). She wants her son to be like her husband, Woo Yang-woo (Jo Jae-Yoon), which means becoming a doctor. She befriends Seo-jin to get information and to achieve a perfect career and education for her family.

Following the suicide of Lee Myung-Joo (Kim Jung-nan), mother of Park Young-Jae (Song Geon-hee), who was a former student of Joo-young and recently admitted to the Seoul National University, Lee Soo-im (Lee Tae-ran)’s family moves into the SKY Castle. Her husband, Hwang Chi-young (Choi Won-young), works at the same hospital as Joon-sang and Yang-woo, and her son, Hwang Woo-Joo (Kang Chang-hee), attends the same school as Ye-seo. Her family often clashes with the other residents due to their differences in opinions.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Yum Jung-ah as Han Seo-jin/Kwak Mi-hyang[12]

An overzealous mother who wants nothing more than her daughter to get into Seoul National Medical University. She hides her past from everyone except her husband and in-laws who knew that she grew up poor with an alcoholic father who sold oxblood and offal. She is the mother of Kang Ye-seo and Kang Ye-bin; the wife of Kang Joon-sang and daughter-in-law of Madame Yoon.

Lee Tae-ran as Lee Soo-im[12]

A new member of the neighborhood disapproves of the other parents’ methods for getting their kids to university, believing it is too harsh. She is disliked by the other parents for disrupting the status quo. She knows who Seo-jin is, as she knew her from when they were younger. She is the most down-to-earth out of all mothers in the complex and the only mother who is a stepmother. She is the stepmother of Hwang Woo-Joo; and the wife of Hwang Chi-young.

Yoon Se-ah as No Seung-Hye[12]

A woman who befriends Soo-im, and starts to look down on how the other moms treat everyone and their kids. She changes her ways and becomes protective of her sons from their father’s harsh teaching methods. She is the mother of Cha Se-ri, Cha Seo-Joon, and Cha Ki-Joon. She is the wife of Cha Min-hyuk

Oh Na-ra as Jin Jin-hee[12]

A friend of Seo-jin tries to get her child to do everything with Seo-jinn’s daughter so he can be successful. She bribes Seo-jin with gifts into trusting her with information. But she finds it difficult to keep secrets. Her loyalty changes easily as well depending on who she is with. She is the mother of Woo Soo-Han and the wife of Woo Yang-woo.

Kim Seo-Hyung as Kim Joo-young[13]

She is a well-known tutor only accessible to the elite and only caters to two students at a time. Because of her 100% success rate in getting students accepted, Seo-jin was determined to hire her as her daughter’s tutor. She tutored Young-Jae and Ye-seo. She hides a past that she tries to escape from. She has a daughter, Kay, or Katherine, who was an acclaimed genius when they lived in Fairfax.

Supporting[edit]

Kang family[edit]

Jung Joon-ho as Kang Joon-sang[14]

Seo-jinn’s husband. Doctor of the Joo-Nam University Hospital. He holds Min-hyuk in absolute contempt and delights in the latter’s misfortunes. He is very ambitious and is obsessed with maintaining a good track record to elevate his status in the hospital. He will stop at nothing to get rivals out of the way.

Kim Hye-yoon as Kang Ye-seo

Seo-jinn’s elder daughter. Her dream is to enter Seoul National University‘s medical faculty and be a third-generation doctor. She is very impulsive and is as determined as her father in achieving her goals. She has feelings for Woo-Joo.

Lee Ji-won as Kang Ye-bin[15]

Seo-jinn’s younger daughter. She is cynical and often clashes with her sister and believes her parents only care for her sister. She, however, gets along well with the other children in the complex and is the first one in the family to warm up to Hye-nab

Jung Ae-Ri as Madame Yoon

Joon-sing’s mother-in-law. She is the one who pushed Seo-jin to bring Ye-seo to the top to have a third-generation doctor in the family.

Hwang family[edit]

Choi Won-young as Hwang Chi-young[14]

Soo-Kim’s husband. Doctor of the Joo-Nam University Hospital. Rival of Joon-sang. He grew up at an orphanage that was owned by Soo-i’s parents. He was married to Woo-Jono’s real mother, but after she passed away, he remarried Soo-im.

Kang Chan-hee as Hwang Woo-joo[14]

Soo-i’s step-son is treated like her own son. He likes Hye-na and is liked by Ye-seo. A kind student who always helps other students that have difficulties.

Cha family[edit]

Kim Byung-churl as Cha Min-hyuk[14]

Seung-Hye’s husband. A law school lecturer and former prosecutor. He is strict with his children and holds very high expectations of them, especially academically.

Park Yoo-Na as Che Se-ri[16]

Seung-Hye’s daughter. She is the MD of a nightclub. She lied about being a Harvard University student and got caught.

Kim Dong-hee as Cha Seo-joon[17]

Seung-Hye’s elder son; twin of Ki-Joon. A classmate of Woo-Joo. Even though he is calmer than his younger twin, he strongly dislikes his father’s method of teaching and studying.

Jo Byung-guy as Cha Ki-joon[18]

Seung-Hye’s younger son; twin of Seo-Joon. He likes to play tricks on Ye-seo. He strongly dislikes his father’s method of teaching and studying.

Woo family[edit]

Jo Jae-yoon as Woo Yang-woo[14]

Jin-hee’s husband. An Orthopedic surgeon. He is very obedient to Kang Joon-sang but behind him, he admires Hwang Chi-young.

Lee Eugene as Woo Soo-Han

Jin-hee’s son. He is not interested in studying but still tries his best under huge academic pressure. Soo-Han has a crush on Ye-bin.

People around Joo-young[edit]

Lee Hyun-jin as Jo Tae-Jun [19]

Secretary of Joo-young. Originally met when he sabotaged Kim Joo-young’s husband’s car for her in Fairfax.

Jo Mi-nyao as Kay/Katherine

Kim Joo-young’s daughter. Mentally ill cause by Kim Joo-young sabotaging her father’s car, causing a serious accident leading to her brain damage. Implied to have savant syndrome.

Others[edit]

Kim Bo-ra as Kim Hye-na[20]

Sin-ah Secondary School student. She is treated as an enemy by Ye-seo. She has a mutual feeling with Hwang Woo-Joo. She is the daughter of Kang Joon-sang and Kim Eun-Hye, yet he does not acknowledge her until after her death.[21] (Eps 2, 4-15)

A former resident of Sky Castle committed suicide after her son runs away to his secret girlfriend.

Myung-Jono’s son. After his mother’s death, he wants to reconcile with his father, Park Soo-Chang.

Myung-Jono’s husband and Young-Jae’s father. At first, he’s harsh toward Young-Jae but after his wife’s death he wants to reconcile with Young-Jae

Young Jae’s girlfriend. She is 6 years older than him and hired as a housekeeper by Myung-Joo, coming from a low-class family. Myung-Joo disapproved of her status and her relationship with Young-Jae.

 

-4)

Comment:

this drama centers upon the lengths to which families will go to get their kids into the SKY castle – Seoul, Korea or Yonsei University in Seoul which is the ticket to the upper class in a status-conscious South Korea.  For most children, the route to the top consists of undergraduate degrees at one of the SKY universities (actually the top five) then a graduate degree from a top US university, after military service (for men). Then returning home at age 28 to get married after getting into one of the top corporations or perhaps the top civil service ranks, or becoming a lawyer, judge, or prosecutor.

End Comment

Kingdom

 

Kingdom (South Korean TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Not to be confused with Mnet’s television program Kingdom: Legendary War.

Kingdom
Hangul 킹덤
Genre Historical period

Political drama

Horror

Thriller

Created by Kim Eun-hee
Based on The Kingdom of the Gods
by Kim Eun-hee and Yang Kyung-il[1]
Written by Kim Eun-hee
Directed by Kim Seong-Hun

Park In-je (Season 2)

Starring Ju Ji-hoon

Ryu Seung-Rayong

Bae Doo-na

Kim Sang-ho

Kim Sung-kyu

Kim Hye-Jun

Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 12[2] + 1 special (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer Lee Sang-bake
Producer Lee Sung-joon
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 36–56 minutes
Production company a Story[a][2]
Distributor Netflix
Budget 35 billion (US$29.6 million)[3]
Release
Original network Netflix
Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

High dynamic range

Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release January 25, 2019 –
present
External links
Website

Kingdom (Korean: 킹덤; RR: Kingdom) is a 2019 South Korean political period horror thriller streaming television series, created and written by Kim Eun-hee and directed by Kim Seong-Hun and Park In-je.[4][5][6] It is Netflix‘s first original Korean series,[b] which premiered on January 25, 2019.[7][8][9][10] The series is adapted from the webcomic series The Kingdom of the Gods, which was authored by Kim Eun-hee and drawn by Yang Kyung-il.[1] Set on a fictional, medieval-inspired Joseon, Kingdom explores the story of a Crown Prince, as he sets to investigate the source of a mysterious plague that begins to ravage his country. It stars Ju Ji-hoonRyu Seung-RayongBae Doo-naKim Sang-hoKim Sung-kyu and Kim Hye-jun.

The series was positively reviewed and renewed for a second season which was released on March 13, 2020.[11][12][13][14] A special feature-length episode of the series, titled “Kingdom: Ashen of the North”, was released on July 23, 2021, and focused on the supporting character Ashen played by Jun Ji-Hyun.[15] The episode acts as a sequel to the second season of Kingdom and explores the backstory of Ashen, the mysterious character Lee Chang’s group encountered on their journey north to discover the origins of the infected.[16]

 

Synopsis[edit]

Set during Korea’s Joseon Dynasty, three years after the Imjin War, the first season of Kingdom follows the story of Crown Prince Lee Chang (Ju Ji-hoon) and his subordinates, who stumble across an unnatural plague that resurrects the dead amidst his investigation of a brewing political conspiracy and rumors of the King of Joseon’s death. Amidst the chaos and death that ensues, Chang meets allies who try to make a stand in the city-state of Sangju before it spreads further into the province, only to discover that the plague has already adapted. The second season picks up during Lee Chang’s struggle to save his people from the spread of the plague and his dynasty from the machinations of the powerful Haemon Cho clan who hides a sinister secret.

Kingdom: Ashen of the North[edit]

Kingdom: Ashen of the North explores the backstory of Ashen (Jun Ji-Hyun), the mysterious heir of the Northern Sanjaya tribe village, and the origin of the resurrection plant that triggered an unprecedented cascade of tragic events that swept through the Kingdom of Joseon.

Plot[edit]

‘Kingdom’ locations

The kingdom is set during Korea’s Joseon period, three years after the famous “Battle of Unpot Wetland” near the city of soldier during the Japanese invasions of Korea, where 500 Korean soldiers, led by Governor Ahn Hyeon, defeated an army of 30,000 Japanese invaders. Unbeknownst to the common people, this victory was achieved by using an herb known as the “resurrection plant”, which transformed the diseased villagers of Suman into ferocious zombies; after the battle ended, the zombies were executed and buried in secret.

Season one[edit]

At the start of the series, the King dies of smallpox. Chief State Councilor Lord Cho Hak-Ju (Ryu Seung-Rayong) decides to hide the King’s death until his daughter, Queen Consort Cho (Kim Hye-Jun), produces a son. Such a son would have a more legitimate claim to the throne than Crown Prince Lee Chang, whose mother was a concubine. As a result, the King is inoculated with the resurrection plant and subsequently becomes a monster at night, restrained with chains and fed with the bodies of court servants. Refused permission to visit his father, the prince leaves in disguise to search for Lee Seung-hui (Kwon Bum-take), the doctor who last treated the King. Shocked by what he finds in the process of investigating the King’s illness, he heads to the Southern province of Yeong sang with his loyal bodyguard Mu-Yeong (Kim Sang-ho) to search for more answers. At Lee Seung-hui’s clinic outside the city of Dingane, physician’s assistant Seo-bi (Bae Dona) cares for dozens of patients but is running out of food to feed them. Yeong-shin (Kim Sung-kyu), one of the patients, makes a stew for the people from what he says is deer meat. However, the meat is later revealed to be sourced from the cadaver of someone bitten by the King and all the patients quickly turn into zombies.

The next day, the magistrate of Dingane and nephew of Lord Cho Hak-Ju, Cho Beom-pal (Jeon Seok-ho), disregards Seo-bi and Yeong-shin’s advice to cut off the head of each cadaver, leading to a night of chaos when the dead awaken. When the Prince takes control and orders that the bodies of the undead be destroyed, the yangbans secretly flee on the only boat, carrying their belongings and the corpse of a precious son. Soldiers of the royal guard from Hanyang confront the prince, resulting in the slaughter of dozens of civilians he was trying to help. Subsequently, the Prince goes to Sangho to seek help from Lord Ahn Hyeon, his mentor. Investigating a village that seems to be oddly well-fed in such dire times, he discovers the fate of the missing boat; the precious son became a monster, the yangbans were killed or drowned, and the boat was looted after stranding itself. Awakened from his retreat by his alarm network, Lord Ahn Hyeon (Heo Joon-ho) arrives with troops who know how to deal with the zombie crisis. The season ends with Queen Cho taking the Regency of the vacant throne, decreeing the blockade of the South, while Lord Cho Hak-Ju comes to Kyongsang’s gate with the Army and the zombie King. On the other side, Lord Ahn Hyeon and the Prince fortify Sangho against the zombies while Seo-bi and Cho Beom-pal explore the Frozen Valley, learning the origins of the zombie disease.

Season two[edit]

In Hanyang, the Queen has gathered many pregnant women at Nasonex, her private residence. Mu-Yeong’s wife is there as well, taken as a hostage, to force Mu-Yeong to spy on the prince. Pregnant women are killed when their delivery is not as expected. As a result, the Special Forces Commander becomes suspicious and searches Nasonex. He finds the corpses of seven delivered women. The baby girls were strangled, but the baby boys were only stillborn. At Sangho, it is discovered that the zombies are slowed not by sunlight, but by temperature. Since the weather gets colder, the situation becomes worse after another night of chaos. The prince decides to break into the border fortress with a limited squad. They are successful but fall into a trap. Lord Ahn Hyeon is shot to death, while The Prince is put in presence of the zombie King, and must cut his head off to save his own life. But there was a trap inside the trap; when Lord Cho Hak-Ju turns back to Hanyang, Lord Ahn Hyeon appears as a resurrected zombie. Wearing his commanding flag, he bites Lord Cho Hak-Ju, before being killed himself, proving the existence of zombies and the good faith of the prince. The blockade army allies with The Prince.

The next day, Lord Cho Hak-JU’s corpse disappears. He has been taken by Mu-Yeong, helped by Seo-bi and Cho Beom-pal. They flee towards Hanyang, but along the way, Mu-Yeong is killed. At the Lord Cho Hak-Ju residence, Seo-bi discovers a cure; a full immersion in water forces away the worm-like entities causing the zombification. At the same time, the Queen pretends to give birth, presenting Mu-Yeong wife’s newborn as her own. She poisons her recovered father who discovered the lie and organizes a zombie research lab beneath her Palace. While the Queen prepares a large proscription, the Royal Guards are lured out of the Palace, allowing the Crown Prince to conquer the place. But the Queen practices a scorched earth policy and orders to release the zombies from the research lab, and chaos ensues. However, the plan of closing the gates of the inner Palace is not sufficient, and the Queen is eaten. The last few survivors escape to the Rear Garden and break the ice of the pond. The zombies are stopped by the water, while the bitten but not yet transformed people are saved from being zombified.

Seven years later, the baby is crowned King, while Seo-bi, Yeong-shin, and the former Crown Prince investigate the Northern Provinces. Shortly after their arrival to a seemingly empty village, a mysterious woman named Ashen (Jun Ji-Hyun) appears inside a barn and stands next to the undead who are kept inside wooden boxes for some nefarious purpose.

An of the North[edit]

Set before the events of the first season, the episode delves into Afshin’s origin story and her experiences growing into a scorned woman that turned against the Kingdom of Joseon. During her childhood, Ashen (Kim Shi-ah) lived in the Northern village of Sanjaya with her ailing mother and her father, Ta Hob (Kim Roi-ha) who was one of the Jurchen people living in Joseon and also the head of their settlement. Tensions were high between Joseon, the central kingdom, and the Jurchen border tribes of Paju Owe. The Paju Owe had gathered their army at the basin of the Pajero River.

When fifteen of Paju Owe Jurchen men enter the forbidden area known as Pisa-gun to illegally gather wild ginseng, they all die unexpectedly. It is revealed that Cho Beom-il (Jung Suk-won), a high-ranking member of the Haemon Cho clan, orchestrated the deaths of the Jurchen men. The Deputy Commander of the Caupain group, Min Chi-rock (Park Byung-Eun) investigated the deaths of the Jurchen and discovered Cho’s involvement, he travels to the Sanjaya village to conduct damage control and prevent a conflict against the Kingdom by the Page Owe. Min spread the message that the deaths were due to a tiger attack but some villagers remained skeptical.

During a meeting with Ta Hob, the Commander requests him to travel to the bordering Page Owe tribe and spread the message, that the attack was caused by a tiger who killed the men. Ta Hob agreed to the mission as he had pledged his loyalty to Joseon and hoping his actions will grant Sanjaya governmental representation, improving the lives of its people. This was later revealed to be a ruse conspired by the Commander, to strategically protect the interests of the Kingdom.

On a false hunt for the alleged tiger, the Commander encounters some Pages Owe soldiers and informs the group, that the attackers of the Page Owe men were killed by the villagers of Sanjaya. This act later diverts the Page Owe ‘s hostility towards the village of Sanjaya. Afterward, the Page Owe military led by Ai Da Gan (Koo Kyo-hwan), attacks Sanjaya in the middle of the night, massacring the inhabitants. Before the attack on the village, Ashen finds the resurrection plant in a hidden cave shrine and reads the ancient mural to understand its properties and effects, to tend to her terminally ill mother. Upon returning to the village, she finds that it has been burned to the ground and all the villagers killed. Unbeknownst to Ash in, her father was taken hostage by the Page Owe military.

Being the sole survivor of the massacre, Asian goes to the Commander and begs for a chance to avenge her family. He places her in a military settlement post, where she begins to perform odd jobs while training in the woodlands. Years later, she was told by the Commander to spy on the military camp of Page Owe. While infiltrating the camp, Asian finds her father held as a prisoner, with his limbs amputated. Ta Hob begs his daughter to kill him to end his misery. Asian complies and sets the camp on fire before going back to the settlement. Before her return to the military settlement, the Commander was summoned to return to the South to deal with the war against the Japanese forces, leaving his Second-in-command and soldiers behind. Soon after, Asian reads the records inside the Commander’s hut, implicating the Commander of framing the Sanjaya village for the Jurchen deaths’ at Pisa-gun, leading to the eventual massacre of her village.

Asian prepares to take revenge against the Kingdom of Joseon. After night falls, she kills several Joseon soldiers as they sleep and uses the resurrection plant to bring them back as zombies. While the zombies rampage around the camp, Asian kills any soldiers, with her bow and arrows, who manage to escape or lock themselves beyond the zombies’ reach. Using the last soldier as bait, she attracted the zombies together and then burns them, effectively killing all the soldiers and zombies in the camp. Asian is then seen dragging a giant sack back to her village which looks normal. She then enters her old house which was filled with her family and some villagers. She was awakened to zombie snarls which brings her to the present where the village is burned down and the house is filled with zombies chained to the back of the house. It is revealed that after the massacre of her village, she had converted her family and some villagers into zombies. Asian had been feeding them animals for years but felt that they deserved better food and fed them with a soldier she had carried with her in the sack. She vowed to destroy Joseon and the Jurchen to avenge them and joined them when she is done.

Asian leaves to meet Lee Seung-hui, the Joseon King’s physician at the border in Fiji. She sells him the resurrection plant, setting in motion, the events that would later occur in the “Battle of Unpot Wetland” and the tragedy that would come to pass at Dingane. After exiting the city, Asian walks into an open field, and later witnesses Ai Da Gan and his Page Owe brethren riding horses in the distance. The Page Owe riders approach Asian and she shoots an arrow without hesitation.

Cast[edit]

Character Portrayed by Seasons Asian of
the North[17]
1[18] 2[19]
Main characters
Lee Chang Ju Ji-hoon Main
Seo-bi Bae Dona Main
Yeong-shin Kim Sung-kyu Main
Cho Beom-pal Jeon Seok-ho Main
Lord Cho Hak-ju Ryu Seung-Rayong Main
Queen Consort Cho Kim Hye-Jun Main
Mu-yeong Kim Sang-ho Main
Lord Ahn Hyeon Heo Joon-ho Main Guest
Asian Jun Ji-hyun Guest Main
Young Asian Kim Shi-ah Main
Min Chi-rock Park Byung-eun Recurring Main
Ai Da Gan Koo Kyo-hwan Main
Ta Hob Kim Roi-ha Main
Recurring characters
Cho Beom-il Jung Suk-won Recurring Guest
Lee Seung-hui Kwon Bum-take Guest Guest
Kim Sun Kim Jong-soo Recurring
Deok Sung Jin Seon-kyu Recurring Guest
Lee Do-jin Joo Suk-tea Recurring Guest
Lee Gang-Yun Kim Tae-hoon Recurring

Main[edit]

Ju Ji-hoon as Lee Chang: The Crown Prince of Joseon and the current heir to the throne. Suspicious of the mysterious illness afflicting his father, the King of Joseon, his investigation not only uncovers a dangerous plague that brings the dead to life, but also a plot to betray the Royal family and usurp him as heir.[20]

Bae Dona as Seo-bi: A physician’s assistant from Dingane who is among the first to discover the outbreak of the mysterious plague. She desperately seeks to find a cure and comes to possess a journal containing crucial information about the disease.[2]

Kim Sung-kyu as Yeong-shin: A mysterious tiger hunter from the South who is also among the first to discover the outbreak of the plague. A skilled fighter who carries early European muskets, he allies himself with Lee Chang and helps to lead the fight against the undead.

Jeon Seok-ho as Cho Beom-pal: A somewhat incompetent magistrate of Dingane and Cho Hak-Ju’s nephew. He used to be more interested in self-preservation than protecting his people.[21]

Ryu Seung-Rayong as Lord Cho Hak-Ju (seasons 1–2): The Chief State Councilor of Joseon and head of the Haemon Cho clan. He is the father of Queen Consort Cho and Cho Beom-il and the uncle of Cho Beom-pal. A cold, ruthless leader, he is desperate to secure his power over the throne through Queen Cho’s unborn child who he seeks to make an heir to the throne in place of Lee Chang.[22]

Kim Hye-Jun as Queen Consort Cho (seasons 1–2): The young and “pregnant” Queen of Joseon who is Cho Hak-Ju’s daughter, Cho Beom-ill’s sister, and Lee Chang’s stepmother. Like her father, she is desperate to secure her power over the throne by giving birth to a son that will displace Crown Prince Lee Chang as the rightful heir.

Kim Sang-ho as Mu-Yeong (seasons 1–2): Prince Chang’s loyal personal bodyguard accompanies him to the southern provinces to investigate the plague, leaving his pregnant wife in the capital.[23]

Heo Joon-ho as Lord Ahn Hyeon (season 1; guest season 2): A former governor and war hero who has retired from public service, despite his popularity with the people, to live a quiet life in Sangho. He was also a mentor to the young Lee Chang.[24]

Jun Ji-Hyun as Asian (special; guest season 2): A mysterious stranger from Hengyang province in the North of the country.

Kim Shi-ah as young Asian[25]

Park Byung-Eun as Min Chi-rock (special; recurring season 2): Head of the Royal Commandery and a skilled archer who becomes suspicious of the Queen.

Koo Kyo-hwan as Ai Da Gan (special): Leader of the Page Owe tribe.

Kim Roi-ha as Ta Hob (special): Head of the Northern Sanjaya tribe and the father of Asian.

Supporting[edit]

Jung Suk-won as Cho Beom-il (seasons 1–2; special): Cho-Hak-Ju’s son and Queen Cho’s elder brother and a commander in the Royal Army.

Kim Jong-soo as Kim Sun: Chief Scholar in Hanyang who clashes with Cho Hak-Ju.

Kwon Bum-take as Lee Seung-hui (season 1; special): Royal physician who attends to the King.

Lee Yang-hee as the Minister of War: Powerful politician in Hanyang who is initially loyal to the Haemon Cho clan but finds his loyalty wavering.

Jin Seon-kyu as Deok Sung: Ahn Hyeon’s loyal right-hand man.

Joo Suk-tea as Lee Do-jin (seasons 1–2): Leader of the Palace Guard who travels south to apprehend Lee Chang, he is loyal to Cho Hak-Ju.

Ahn Eun-jin as Mu-Yeong’s wife: A loving, pregnant, wife who was put under the protection of the Haemon Cho clan.

Kim Tae-hoon as Lee Gang-Yun (season 2): Head of the Royal Army, who travels south with Cho Hak-Ju.

Jo Han-Chula as Won Yu (season 2): Descendant of an exiled member of the royal family living a quiet life on a remote island, who is sought out by Lee Chang.

Ahn Jae-Hong as Eunuch (season 2): Former eunuch who later becomes the new king’s servant.

Kim Kang-hoon as Mu-Yeong’s son (season 2): A young boy who was rescued from a horde of zombies as a baby by Seo-bi.

 

Comments:  Zombie attacks in the Chosen dynasty.  End comment

Reply 1988

 

Reply 1988

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Reply 1988
Promotional
Hangul 응답하라 1988
Hanja 應答하라 1988
Genre Family
Comedy
Romance
Written by Lee Woo-Jung
Directed by Shin Won-ho
Starring Lee Hye-Ri
Ryu Jun-yeol
Go Kyung-Pio
Park Bo-gum
Lee Dong-why
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 20 + special
Production
Running time 90–110 minutes
Production company CJ E&M
Release
Original network tvN
Original release November 6, 2015 –
January 16, 2016
Chronology
Preceded by Reply 1994
External links
Website

Reply 1988 (Korean: 응답하라 1988; Hanja: 應答하라 1988; RR: Endophora 1988) is a South Korean television series starring Lee Hye-RiRyu Jun-yeolGo Kyung-PioPark Bo-gum, and Lee Dong-why.[1][2][3] Beginning in the year 1988, it revolves around five friends and their families living in the same neighborhood of Sangamon, Dugong, Northern Seoul.[4] It aired every Friday and Saturday from November 6, 2015, to January 16, 2016, on tvN for 20 episodes.[5][6]

Reply 1988 is the third installment of tvN‘s Reply series.[7] It received both critical and audience acclaim with its final episode recording an 18.8% nationwide audience share, making it the fourth highest-rated drama in Korean cable television history.[8][9]

Lee Hye-RI as Sung Duk-seon/Sung Soo-yeon[10]

The middle child of her family, she is infamously ranked 999th in school and is the only girl in their group of five neighborhood friends. Though not academically gifted, Duk-seon has a bright and compassionate personality. She cares deeply for her friends and classmates but feels lost without a “dream” to pursue. Dukedom moves through the stages of her youth alongside her male friends, and the mystery of which of them she eventually marries is a continual point of tension for viewers throughout the series.

Ryu Jun-yeol as Kim Jung-hwan

Stoic and sarcastic, but with a secret sweetheart, Jung-hwan (called Jung-pal by his friends) is one of the leaders of the neighborhood group. Jung-hwan is handsome, smart, and athletic, often taking on extra feelings of responsibility to fulfill the dreams of his older brother Jung-bong, who has a chronic heart condition. While Jung-hwan doesn’t often share his emotions with others, he feels things deeply and uses his sarcasm and attitude as a shield. He develops feelings for a neighborhood friend early but is reluctant to admit his crush, even as the right timing slips away.

Go Kyung-Pio as Sung Sun-woo

A class president, caring brother, and dependable son to his widowed mother, Sun-woo is an ideal young man. He is devoted to his friends and dotes on his younger sister. Sun-woo harbors a secret crush on a neighborhood friend that lingers into adulthood.

Park Bo-gum as Choi Taek[11]

An internationally renowned genius Badu player, Taek is the quietest of his neighborhood friends. Taek dominates on the Badu board but struggles with simple everyday tasks. His Badu success has brought money and fame but has left Taek distant from his age group, and so he relies on his neighborhood friends for companionship, grounding, and a connection to youth. Taek is generous to a fault and hesitant to make a fuss, but that hesitancy disappears in competition. However, when he realizes that the person he cares for has another admirer, he has to weigh romance against friendship.

Lee Dong-why as Ryu Dong-Rayong

The neighborhood clown, Dong-Rayong loves to sing, dance, and play jokes with his friends. Like Dukedom, Dong-Rayong is not a natural academic, but his thoughtful insight and surprising wisdom serve him and his friends well. As the son of two working parents surrounded by tight-knit families, Dong-Rayong sometimes feels neglected by his parents and makes up for their absence by acting out. His nosy nature means that he ends up knowing many of the neighborhood’s secrets before anyone else.

Recurring[edit]

Sung family

Sung Dong-il as Sung Dong-il (Dukedom’s father)

A fraud and security specialist at a bank, Dong-il fell into debt after lending money to a friend who never paid it back. He struggles to provide for his family as he wants to while paying off the debt but does his best to give everything he can to his children. He and his wife, Il-Hwa, argue but love each other very deeply.

Lee Il-Hwa as Lee Il-Hwa (Duck-Seon’s mother)

Il-Hwa is a kind woman who spends much of her time with the other moms and caring for her family. She worries about her children and husband and shows much of her care by cooking massive quantities of food to share with her family and the neighborhood.

Ryu Hye-young as Sung Bo-ra (Duck-Seon’s older sister).

Bo-ra is a tough-as-nails college student who wants to become a lawyer. While outwardly stoic, she has a warm heart and shows compassion to those who need it most. Where Dukedom struggles academically but excels at interpersonal relationships, Bo-ra is a stellar student who stumbles in social and emotional situations. She carries on a secret relationship with another person in the neighborhood.

Choi Sung-won as Sung No-Eul (Duck-Seon’s younger brother)

Dong-ill’s assistant in his schemes, No-eul is a kindhearted young teen with a beautiful singing voice and a poetic, dreamer’s mind.

Kim family

Kim Sung-kyun as Kim Sung-kyun (Jung-Hwan’s father)

Sung-Hyun is a kind and humorous man who runs an electronics store. He loves to joke and play with the neighborhood kids, and generally keeps an air of joviality among the adults. He adores his wife, Mi-ran, and hopes for good futures for his sons.

Ra Mi-ran as Ra Mi-ran (Jung-Hwan’s mother)

A tough lady with a strong past, Mi-ran is the indisputable empress of the Kim household. Worried about Jung-bong since his childhood diagnosis with a chronic heart condition and annoyed with his constant academic failures punctuated by collecting obsessions, Mi-ran can sometimes come off as short-tempered. This short temper is an expression of her anxiety and love for her children and family.

Ahn Jae-Hong as Kim Jung-bong (Jung-Hwan’s older brother)

A student who failed his college entrance exam 6 times, Jung-bong has a chronic heart condition that made his childhood difficult. He has a sometimes childlike personality and is easily distracted. Nevertheless, Jung-bong is kind, thoughtful, compassionate, and easy to like. He happily cares for the neighborhood kids including Jin-Joo, Sun-woo’s little sister. He is a surprisingly poetic romantic.

Sun-woo family

Kim Sun-young as Kim Sun-young (Sun-woo’s mother)

A kind young widow, Sun-young dotes on her children as much as possible, probably to try to make up for their father’s absence. She struggles with her mother-in-law and does her best to keep the family afloat. With a sunny personality and an upbeat disposition, she is always looking for the best side of any situation and can make even the most bear-like person laugh.

Kim Seol as Sung Jin-Joo (Sun-woo’s little sister)

A precocious toddler in 1988, one can assume Jin-Joo was born somewhere between 1983 and 1984. Doted on by everyone in the neighborhood, Jin-Joo is adored by all of the adults and teens alike. She loves her older brother but is a bit more reserved with others.

Neighborhood residents

Choi Moo-sung as Choi Moo-sung is also called “Bonghwangdang.”

Teak’s father and the owner of a watch store at the entrance to the alley. Moo-sung moved to the neighborhood at the behest of Sun-young, whom he has known since childhood, after the death of Teak’s mother. He was adopted into the neighborhood family as he raised Taek alone. Quiet and reserved, Moo-Sung’s unassuming exterior conceals hidden depths of emotion and compassion for his son, his friends, and the neighborhood as a whole.

Yoo Jae-Myung as Ryu Jae-Myung (Dong-Yong’s father)

A dean at the boy’s high school, Jae-Myung once harbored dreams of being a dancer. Now focused on shaping the men of the future, he does his best to keep his son in check while still enjoying his life.

Extended[edit]

Lee Min-Ji as Jang Mi-ok (Duck Seon’s friend)

A wealthy student. At first, her father was shown as a scary person but later it was revealed that he was a textile businessman who started his business from scratch. A good friend to Dukedom and Ja-Hyun, she is practical and excitable. Married Kim Jung-Bong, elder brother of Kim Jung-Hwan.

Lee Se-young as Wang Ja-Hyun (Duck Seon’s friend)

A constant friend to Dukedom and Mi-ok, Ja-Hyun is focused on boys and becoming a hairstylist.

Lee Mi-Yeon as adult Sung Dukedom

Kim Joo-hyuk as adult Choi Taek

Jeon Mi-seen as adult Sung Bo-ra

Woo Hyun as adult Sung No-eul

Lee Chung-mi as Nam Goong Nelumbo

Lee Jin-Kwon a Bad student

Seo Cho-won as Supporting

Park Ah-sung as Student

Song Young Kyu as Sun-young’s older brother

Yong Young-Jae as director of Korea Baduk Association

Bae Yoo-ram

Special appearances[edit]

Kim Young-ok as Duck Seon’s grandmother (ep. 2)

Jung Won-Jong as Dong-ill’s older brother (ep. 2)

Kim Sure as snack shop owner (ep. 3)

Lee Moon-se (voice) as radio DJ (ep. 6)

Park Ji-Yoon as TV interviewer (ep. 7)

Park Jung-min as Bo-ra’s boyfriend (ep. 8)

Kim Tae-hoon as Cardiac surgeon (ep. 8)

Lee Soo-Kyung as Lee Soo-Kyung, No-Elu’s girlfriend (ep. 8)

Jung Yoo-min as Bo-ra’s friend (ep. 8)

Jung Hae-in as Ho-young, Deok-sun’s middle school friend (ep. 13)

Shin Young-jin as Class President’s mother (ep.14)

Ahn Sung-ki (ep. 17)

Jung Woo as Trash (ep.18)

Go Ara as Sung Na-Jung (ep.18)

Production[edit]

Leads Hyeri and Park Bo-gum in costume at a fan signing event for the series, February 2016

Reply 1988 marked the third collaboration between director Shin Won-ho, screenwriter Lee Woo-Jung and actors Sung Dong-il and Lee Il-Hwa after Reply 1997 (2012) and Reply 1994 (2013). Kim Sung-Kyun, who co-starred in 1994 also joined the cast. The first script-reading was held in August 2015.[12] Choi Taek, played by Park Bo-gum, was loosely based on the real-life Go player, Lee Chang-ho.[13]

Unlike the previous Reply series, 1988 focused more on filial bonds than a romance between characters with director Shin saying that most of the story was about family, and only a small fraction was about Duck-Seon’s love.[14]

Comment:  period piece circa 1988 set in Ssangmoondong, a typical middle-class neighborhood in northern Seoul. End comment

Cosmos commentary:

similar to a US movie from a few years back.  Two cops are linked through a mysterious connection across allowing them to collaborate to solve crime cases.

Signal (South Korean TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

This article is about the South Korean TV series. For the Japanese remake, see Signal (Japanese TV series).

Signal
Promotional poster
Hangul 시그널
Genre Procedural

Drama

Thriller

Fantasy

Created by Choi Jin-hee

Park Ji-young

Written by Kim Eun-hee
Directed by Kim Won-seok
Starring Lee Je-hoon

Kim Hye-soo

Cho Jin-wooing

Opening theme “I Will Forget You” by Jung Cha-Sik
Ending theme “The One Who Will Leave” by INKII

“The Road” by Kim Yoon-ah

Composers Kim Joon-Seok

Park Sung-il

Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 16
Production
Executive producers Lee Chan-ho

Lee Sang-bake

Producers Lee Jae-moon

Park Eun-Kyung

Cinematography Choi Sang-mook

Lee Joo-young

Editor Kim Na-young
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 80 minutes
Production company a Story
Distributor tvN
Release
Original network tvN
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release January 22 –
March 12, 2016
Chronology
Followed by Signal 2 (2020)[1]
Related shows Signal (2018)

Unknown Number (2019)

External links
Website
Signal at a Story Co., Ltd.

Signal (Korean: 시그널; RR: Diegueno) is a 2016 South Korean fantasy police procedural television series starring Lee Je-hoonKim Hye-soo, and Cho Jin-wrong. It aired on tvN from January 22 to March 12, 2016, on Fridays and Saturdays at 20:30 KST for 16 episodes.[2][3][4] The series was inspired by real-life criminal incidents in Korea,[5] including the Hazing.[6][7]

The series received widespread acclaim from the audience and critics alike for its story and performances. It is also the eleventh highest-rated Korean drama in cable television history with a peak audience viewership of 12.54%.

Premise[edit]

walkie-talkie allows a detective in the year 1989 to communicate with a cold case profiler from 2015. With the power of fore- and hindsight, the two not only solve crimes but prevent them from ever taking place.

Synopsis[edit]

criminal profiler Park Hae-young (Lee Je-hoon), solves a kidnapping case that ended up with a falsely accused who disappeared after the crime, with a mysterious walkie-talkie he picks up. The success of this case triggers the formation of a long-term cold case team, led by Detective Cha Soo-Hyun (Kim Hye-soo), who has been searching for her long-lost mentor Lee Jae-Han (Cho Jin-Wong), for the past fifteen years. With the help of Detective Lee Jae-Han, the person at the other end of the walkie-talkie, Park Hae-young solves other cold cases that have remained unsolved for years, while helping Lee Jae-can help solve some cases in the past. Grave unintended sequences follow.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Lee Je-hoon is Park Hae-young,[8] the profiler who finds the walkie-talkie by accident and uses it to solve cold cases.

Kim Hye-soo as Cha Soo-Hyun,[9] once a timid rookie and the first woman police officer in the department, leads the “Long Term Cold Case team”

Cho Jin-Wong as Lee Jae-Han,[10] the somewhat clumsy and socially inept but incorruptible police officer from the past who establishes a rapport with Park.

Supporting[edit]

Police officers

Jang Hyun-sung as Kim Bum-joo

Jung Hae-kyun as Ahn Chi-soo

Kim Won-hae as Kim Eichel

Jung Han-bi [ko] as Oh Yoon-seo

Lee Yoo-Jun [ko] as Jung Han-ki

Kim Min-kyu as Hwang Etui-kyung

Extended

Kim Hyun-bin as young Park Hae-young

Kang Chan-hee as Park Sun-woo

Lee Moon-soo as Lee Jae-Han’s father

Seo Jun-hee as Cha Soo-Hyun’s mother

Lim Hwa-young as Cha Soo-Hyun’s younger sister

Lee Jin-Kwon as Supporting

Special appearances[edit]

Oh Yeon-ah as Yoon Soo-ah (ep. 1-2)

Lee Young-eun as Kim Yoon-jung (ep. 1-2)

Lee Si-a as Kim Won-kyung (ep. 2-4)

Kim Jung-young as Won-Kyung’s aunt (ep. 2-4)

Kim Ki-Cheon as Lee Chun-goo (ep. 3-4)

Lee Dong-ha as Han Se-yo (el. 5-8)

Jung Suk-yong as Oh Kyung-tea (ep. 5-7)

Park Si-eun as Oh Eun-ji (ep. 5-6)

Choi Woo-ri as Shin Yeo-jin (ep. 5-6)

Yoo Ha-bok as Shin Dong-hoon (ep. 5-7)

Son Hyun-Joo as Jang Young-Chula (ep. 7, 11, 14, 16)

Lee Na-ra as Shin Da-Hye (ep. 7-8)

Lee Sang-year as Kim Jin-woo (ep. 9-11)

Lee Chae-Kyung as Jin-woo’s mother (ep. 10)

Seo Eun-ah as Yoo Seung-yeon (ep. 10-11)

Shin Yi-joon as Kang Hye-Seung (young / ep. 11-14)

Kim Woo-suk as Lee Dong-jin (ep. 12-14)

Hwang Seung-eon as Han Do-yeon (ep. 13)

Jeon Su-ji as Kang Hye-Seung (adult/ep. 13-14)

Seo Ji-hoon as Jang Tae-jin (ep. 14)

Upon its premiere, the series attracted attention for weaving actual cases into its plot and attained high ratings.[11][12] With its final rating of 12.54%, it is one of the highest-rated Korean dramas in cable television history.[13][14] It received praise for its solid acting, tightly-constructed plot, and detailed and sophisticated direction; and enjoyed success internationally in China and Japan.[15][16][17]

The drama went on to win several awards from different award-giving bodies, including Best Drama, Best Screenplay for Kim Eun-hee, and Best Actress for Kim Hye-soo at the 52nd Buesking Arts Awards, as well as another Best Actress award for Kim and the Dasani (Grand Prize for Television) for Cho Jin-Wong at the tvN10 Awards. Cho also won the Dasani at the 1st Asia Artist Awards for his performance.

 

Comment: similar to a US drama a few years ago. End comment

My Mister

 

My Mister
Promotional poster
Also known as My Ajose
Hangul 나의 아저씨
Revised Romanization Naoi Ajose
Genre Drama
Created by Studio Dragon
Written by Park Hae-young[1]
Directed by Kim Won-seok[1]
Starring Lee San-kyun

Lee Ji-eun

Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 16
Production
Executive producers Cho Hyung-jin

Kim Sang-heon

Park Ho-sik

Producer Park Ji-hyun
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 90 minutes
Production company Chorogram Media
Distributor tvN
Release
Original network tvN
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release March 21 –
May 17, 2018
External links
Website
Production website

My Mister (Korean: 나의 아저씨; RR: Naoi Ajose) is a 2018 South Korean television series starring Lee Sun-Kyun and Lee Ji-Eun. The series was directed by Kim Won-Seok, written by Park Hae-young, and produced by Cookable. It aired on tvN from March 21 to May 17, 2018, on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 21:30 (KST) time slot.[2][3][4]

The drama received critical acclaim, winning Best Drama at the 55th Buesking Arts Awards.

Synopsis[edit]

My Mister tells us the story of three middle-aged brothers, who are enduring the weight of their lives, and a strong, cold woman, who has been living a hard life of her own, as they come together in healing each other’s past scars.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Lee Sun-kyun as Park Dong-hoon[1]

The second oldest of the three brothers. He works as a structural engineer and always has a safety-first approach to life. He is quiet and stoic but also goes all in for the people he loves.

Lee Ji-eun (IU) as Lee Ji-an[1]

Kim Gyu-ri as child Ji-an

A woman who is enduring many hardships in life. She is tasked by her boss who runs a company she is temporarily working for to discover Park Dong-hood’s weaknesses, but she soon ends up falling for his warm charms and learns to trust someone for the first time.

Supporting[edit]

Dong-hood’s family[edit]

Go Doo-shim as Byun Yo-soon[5]

A loving mother with three sons who worries about her eldest living apart from his family, and her youngest, who has yet to get married despite being over 40.

Park Ho-san [ko] as Park Sang-hoon[6]

Dong-hood’s eldest brother. He is a middle-aged man who was fired from his job and then ran two failing businesses, which ended up in him being chased out of his own home. Though he has to live under his mother’s roof, he’s a romanticist at heart who always thinks about ways to find happiness.

Song Sae-beak as Park Ki-hoon[1]

Dong-hood’s younger brother. He was once seen as a genius director because an independent film he shot when he was twenty was invited to the Cannes Film Festival. However, 20 years have passed since his glory days. He has yet to successfully launch his career as a movie director.

Lee Ji-ah is Kang Yoon-hee,[7] Park Dong-hood’s wife, who is having an affair with Do Joon-young, her husband’s boss who is younger than him.

Jung Young-joo [ko] as Jo Ae-Ryun.[8]

Lee Ji-ant’s family[edit]

Son Sook [ko] as Lee Bong-ae: Lee Ji-ant’s deaf grandmother.

People around Lee Ji-an[edit]

Jang Ki-yong as Lee Kwang-il[9]

A loan shark, who liked Ji-and when he was young.

Ahn Seung-gun as Song Ki-bum[10]

Ji-ant’s best friend.

Lee Young-seok [ko] as Hongdae: Kwang-ill’s partner.

People in the company[edit]

Kim Young-min [ko] as Do Joon-young[11]

Dong-hood’s college junior and Ji-ant’s boss, currently working as a CEO.

Shin Goo as Chairman Jang Hoe-jang

Jung Jae-sung [ko] as Executive Director Yoon Sang-tea

Seo Hyun-woo as Head of Section Seo

Chae Dong-hyun [ko] as Kim Dae-ri

Kim Min-seok [ko] as Yeo Hyung-kyu

Ryu Sun-young [ko] as Jung Chae-rung[12]

Dong-hoon and Ji-ant’s co-worker.

Extended[edit]

Kwon Na-ra as Choi Yoo-ra[13]

A movie actress, and Park Ki-hood’s love interest.

Park Hae-joon as Gumede

Dong-hood’s friend and has dated Jung-hee in the past.

Oh Na-ra as Jung-hee

Owner of Jung-hee’s Bar, friends with Dong-hoon.

Shin Dam-soo [ko] as Director Jung Chang-mo

Park Soo-young as Je-Cheol

 

 

Hospital Playlist

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

navigation Jump

Hospital Playlist
Official promotional poster season 2
Hangul 슬기로운 의사생활
Hanja 슬기로운 醫師生活
Genre Medical

Drama

Romance

Comedy

Life

Created by Lee Myung-Han (tvN)
Written by Lee Woo-Jung
Directed by Shin Won-ho
Starring Jo Jung-suk

Yoo Yeon-Seok

Jung Kyung-ho

Kim Dae-Myung

Jeon Mi-do

Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 2
No. of episodes 24
Production
Executive producer Park Seung Jae
Producer Choi Sung Yoon
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 72–113 minutes
Production companies Egg Is Coming

CJ ENM

Distributor tvN

Netflix[1]

Release
Original network tvN
Picture format HDTV 1080i
Original release March 12, 2020 –
present
External links
Website

Hospital Playlist (Korean: 슬기로운 의사생활; Hanja: 슬기로운

The series follows five doctors in their 40s who have been best friends since they entered medical school in 1999. Lee Ik-Jun (Jo Jung-suk) is an assistant professor of general surgery specializing in liver transplants. He takes care of his young son as a single father after getting divorced from his adulterous wife. His cheerful charisma allows him to connect with many people, making him a popular figure among both patients and other doctors. Unapologetically good at anything he puts his mind to, Ahn Jeong-won (Yoo Yeon-Seok), an assistant professor of pediatric surgery, is generous and caring, endearing him to his patients. He is a devout Catholic and secretly plans to become a priest due to the pain caused by seeing his patients suffer. Kim Jun-wan (Jung Kyung-ho) is an associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery, who appears cold and professional. However, he hides a soft, kind temperament that rarely shows, only surfacing with his friends and certain patients. Yang Seok-Hyeong (Kim Dae-Myung), an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, is an aloof and introverted doctor. Though he comes off as detached, he is willing to go the extra mile for the female patients under his watch. He is divorced and deeply cares for his mother. Chae Song-Hwa (Jeon Mi-do), the only female in the group of friends, is an associate professor of neurosurgery. She is considered perfect by her colleagues: she treats patients kindly, performs hundreds of successful surgeries, and has a great personality.

The story revolves around a group of friends as they embark on hospital adventures involving medicine, music, and relationships.

Cast[edit]

Overview[edit]

Actor Character Season
(Year)
1
(2020)
2
(2021)
Jo Jung-suk Lee Ik-Jun Main
Yoo Yeon-Seok Ahn Jeong-won Main
Jung Kyung-ho Kim Jun-wan Main
Kim Dae-Myung Yang Seok-Hyeong Main
Jeon Mi-do Chae Song-Hwa Main
Shin Hyun-bin Jang Gyro-wool Recurring
Kwak Sun-young Lee Ik-sun Recurring
Ahn Eun-jin Choo Min-ha Recurring
Jung Moon-sung Do Jae-hack Recurring
Moon Tae-Joo Yong Seok-min Recurring
Ha Yoon-Kyung Heo Sun-Bin Recurring
Kim Jun-Han Ahn Chi-Hong Recurring

Main[edit]

Jo Jung-suk as Lee Ik-Jun, an assistant professor of general surgery.

Yoo Yeon-Seok as Ahn Jeong-won, an assistant professor of pediatric surgery.

Jung Kyung-ho as Kim Jun-wan, an associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery.

Kim Dae-Myung is Yang Seok-Hyeong, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

Jeon Mi-do as Chae Song-Hwa, an associate professor of neurosurgery.[11]

Supporting[edit]

Doctors[edit]

Shin Hyun-bin as Jang Gyro-wool, a third-year resident in general surgery.

Jung Moon-sung as Do Jae-hack, chief resident of cardiothoracic surgery.

Ahn Eun-jin as Choo Min-ha, a second-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology.[12]

Kim Jun-Han is Ahn Chi-Hong, a third-year resident in neurosurgery.

Moon Tae-you as Yong Seok-min, chief resident of neurosurgery.

Ha Yoon-Kyung as Heo Sun-bin, a third-year resident in neurosurgery.

Choi Young-Joon as Bong Gwang-Hyun, assistant professor of emergency medicine.

Seo Jin-won as Min Gi-Joon, professor of neurosurgery.

Kim Hye-in as Myung Eun-won, a second-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology.[13]

Choi Young-woo as Cheon Myung-tea, professor of cardiothoracic surgery.

Shin Do-Hyun as Bae Joon-hee, the fellow in emergency medicine.

Jeon Kwang-jin as Jong Se-hyuk, the fellow in orthopedic surgery.

Lee Se-hee as Kang So-ye, one-year Fellow in emergency medicine [14]

Woo Jung-won as Yom Se-hee, Professor of Stainbrook [15]

Lee Jong-won as Kim Geon [16]

Lee Jung-won as Hwang Ji-woo, second-year surgeon [17]

Nurses and medical students[edit]

Kim Soo-jin as Song Soo-bin, surgical ward nurse.

Yoon Hye-RI as So Yi-Hyun, cardiothoracic surgery medical assistant.

Yang Jo-ah as Hwang Jae-shin, neurosurgery medical assistant.

Lee Noh-ah as Lee Young-ha, surgical ward nurse.

Lee Dal as Kim Jae-hwan, surgical ward nurse.

Lee Hye-Eun as Kook Hye-sung, general surgery medical assistant.

Lee Ji-won as Han Hyun-hee, pediatric surgery medical assistant.

Lee Jong-won as Kim Geon-run, second-year surgeon major.

Kim Ji-sung as Han Seung-Joo, obstetrics and gynecology delivery room nurse.

Seol Yu-jin as Eun Sun-jin, obstetrics, and gynecology medical assistant.

Kim Bi-bi as Ham Deok-Joo, transplant coordinator.

Park Han-sol as Sun woo Hee-soo, emergency room nurse.

Cho Yi-hyun as Jang Yun-bok, third-year medical student.[18]

Bae Hyun-sung as Jang Hong-do, third-year medical student.

Kim Kang-min as Im Chang-min, intern.

Lee Chan-Hyung as Choi Seon-young, intern.

Chae Min-hee as So-Yeon, [19]

Family members of the main characters[edit]

Kwak Sun-young is Lee Ik-sun, Ik-Joon’s younger sister and Jun-win’s girlfriend.

Kim Joon as Lee Woo-Joo, Ik-Joon’s son.

Kim Hae-sook as Jung Rosa, Jeong-won’s mother.

Sung Dong-il is Jeong-won’s eldest brother.

Kim Kapp-soo as Joo Jong-soo, president of the Yule Foundation.

Cho Seung-Yeon as Joo Jun, director of Yule Medical Center.

Moon Hee-Kyung as Cho Young-Hye, Seok-Yeong’s mother.

Nam Myung-real as Yang Tae-yang, Seok-Hyeon’s father.

Lee So-Yoon is Kim Tae-yeon, Yang Tae-yang’s mistress.

 

Comments:  Like a Korean version of Gray’s Anatomy?  End Comment

Flower of Evil

 

Flower of Evil (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

navigation Jump

Flower of Evil
Promotional poster
Hangul 악의 꽃
Genre Melodrama

Suspense

Created by Monster Union
Studio Dragon
Written by Yoo Jung-hee
Directed by Kim Cheol-kyu
Starring Lee Joon-gi

Moon Chae-won

Jang Hee-jin

Seo Hyun-woo

Composers Kim Jun-Seok
Jung Se-rin
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 16
Production
Executive producer Yoo Sang won
Producer Jung Hae-Rayong

Jang Shin-ae

Kim Dae-ho

Editor Younghood Kim
Running time 70 minutes
Production companies Monster Union
Studio Dragon
Distributor tvN
Release
Original network tvN
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital
Original release July 29 –
September 23, 2020
External links
Website

Flower of Evil (Korean: 악의 꽃; RR: Ague knot) is a South Korean television series starring Lee Joon-giMoon Chae-wonJang Hee-jin, and Seo Hyun-woo.[1][2][3] It aired on tvN every Wednesday and Thursday from July 29 to September 23, 2020,[4] and streamed internationally on IliyaViki, and Vito with multi-languages subtitles. Lee and Moon have previously starred in Criminal Minds, and it was Lee’s return to television after two years.[5]

 

Synopsis[edit]

Baek Hee-sung (Lee Joon-gi) is a man who hides his identity and past from his wife Cha Ji-won (Moon Chae-won), a detective. On the surface, they appear to be the perfect family: a loving couple with a beautiful daughter who adores her parents. Cha Ji-won and her colleagues begin investigating a series of unexplained murders and are confronted with the reality that her seemingly perfect husband may be hiding something from her.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Lee Joon-gi as Baek Hee-sung / Do Hyun-soo[1]

Park Hyun-joon as young Hyun-soo

Cha Sung-je as child Hyun-soo

Moon Chae-won as Cha Ji-won, Hee-sung/Hyun-soo’s wife[1]

Jang Hee-jin as Do Hae-soo[2]

Lim Na-young as teenage Hae-soo, Hyun-soo’s older sister[6]

Lee Chae-Yoon as eleven-year-old Hae-soo

Seo Hyun-woo as Kim Moo-jin, journalist[3]

Jeong Taek-hyun as young Moo-jin[7]

Supporting[edit]

Baek Hee-sung & Cha Ji-won’s family[edit]

Jung Seo-Yeon as Baek Eun-ha, daughter of Hee-sung and Ji-won[8]

Son Jong-hakas Baek Man-woo, Hee-Sung’s father[9]

Nam Gi-ae as Gong Mi-Ja, Hee-Sung’s mother[10]

Jo Kyung-sook as Moon Young-ok, Ji-won’s mother[11]

Kanoo Police Station[edit]

Choi Dae-hoon as Lee Woo-Cheol, leader of Homicide Investigation Team[10]

Choi Young-Joon as Choi Jae-sub, veteran detective[10]

Kim Soo Oh as Im Ho-Joon, youngest team member[10]

Lim Cha-ching as Yoon Sang-pill, section chief[10]

Hong Seo-Joon as Oh Young-Joon, police captain

Hanoian Magazine[edit]

Yang Hye-jin as Gang Pill-young, lead reporter[10]

Ju Ye-Eun as Reporter Joo

Others[edit]

Choi Byung-mo as Do Min-seok, father of Hae-soo and Hyun-soo

Kim Ji-hoon as Baek Hee-sung

Choi Kwon-soo as young Hee-sung

Lee Kyu-bok as Nam Soon-gill

Kim Geon as Kim In-seo

Lee Ju-Yeon as Park Seo-young

Han Soo-Yeon as Jung Mi-sook

Yoon Byung-hee as Park Kyung-chon, taxi driver and husband of Jung Mi-sook

Park Seung-tea as Oh Bok-ja

Kim Ki-Cheon as Dr. Lee Hyun-suk

 

  1. Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Rye(2016)

15 | 60 min | Drama, Fantasy, History

Rate

Korean melodramatic adaptation of Chinese drama Startling by Each Step (2011) follows a woman who travels back in time to the Goryeo Dynasty of Korea whenever a total eclipse of the sun took place.

Stars: Lee Joon-GiJi-eon LeeKang Ha-NealNam Joo-Hyuk

  1. Sangsogjadeul(2013)

15 | 55 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

After a chance encounter in LA, two teens from different social backgrounds reunite at an exclusive high school attended by Korea’s Uber rich.

Stars: Lee Min-HoPark Shin-HyeWoo-bin KimKim Ji-Won

  1. Kill Me, Heal Me(2015)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

Rate

A love story between the son from a wealthy family who has 7 personalities Cha Do Hyun (Ji Sung) and Oh Ri Jin (Hwang Jung Elum) who becomes his secret psychiatrist.

Stars: Seong JiHwang Jeong-elmKim Hee-JungShim Hye-jin

  1. Healer(2014–2015)

TV-14 | 60 min | Action, Comedy, Crime

An old murder incident involving a group who ran an illegal broadcasting station brings together different people – a mysterious errand guy “Healer” who possesses disguise and fighting … See full summary »

Stars: Ji Chang-WookPark Min-YoungTae-MiJeong Guy-Su

Votes: 6,769

 

  1. My Love from Another Star(2013–2014)

Not Rated | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

Do Min-Joon, an alien that came to our planet 400 years ago, will be able to return to his planet in 3 months, but when he meets famous actress Chun Song-Yi, all the centuries he spent distancing himself from humans come to an end.

Stars: Jun Ji-HyunKim Soo-HyunPark Hae-JinYoo In-Na

Votes: 10,186

 

  1. Oogonium (2013)

Tae Gong Sil can see ghosts, but their constant demands of help make her life impossible until she meets Joo Jong Won, handsome CEO that measures everything with money since when she touches him, the ghosts disappear.

Stars: Kong Hyo-JinSo Ji-sobSeo In-GukYoo-Ri Kim

 

  1. Haereul poteen dal(2012)

TV-Y | Drama, Fantasy, Romance

The story of the secret love between Lee Hwan, a fictional king of Joseon, and Wool, a female shaman. Wool was born as Heo Yeon Woo, the daughter of a noble family who won the love of the … See full summary »

Stars: Mi-seen JeonMi-keying YangEung-soo Kim, Eun-Byul

Votes: 2,034

 

  1. Boys Over Flowers(2009)

TV-14 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

Poor girl attends the elite Shin Hwa High and is bullied by the leader of F4 (the four richest boys). He becomes attracted to her; however, she has a crush on his best friend. Whom will she choose?

Stars: Ku Hye-SunLee Min-HoKim Hyun-JongKim Bum

  1. Minami Shiny(2009)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Music

Go Mi-Nya, a girl about to become a nun is asked to cover for her indisposed twin brother, Mi-Nam, who’s on the verge of becoming a k-idol. To do so, she disguises herself as a boy and joins Arnell, a really popular boy band.

Stars: Park Shin-Hye, Yong-Hwa, Yong-Hwa JungHong-ki Lee

TV-Y | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

Love, tradition, and politics collide when a spirited young art student is betrothed to the crown prince of South Korea.

Stars: Yun Geun-HyeJu Ji-HoonSong Ji-HyoBool-am Choi

  1. Mischievous Kiss(2010)

15 | 66 min | Comedy, Romance

Fate brings polar opposite high school classmates (one obsessively attracted to the other, the other indifferent to all advances) to live under one roof. Is romance possible?

Stars: Jung So-MinKim Hyun-JongTae-Sung LeeHye-Young Jung

  1. Sungkyunkwan Scandal(2010)

TV-Y | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, History

In the Joseon era, Kim Yoon-hee masquerades as a boy to earn a living as a book transcriber. Her family’s dire circumstances and the encouragement of a noble’s son finally drive her to attend Shunyuan University, forbidden for females.

Stars: Park Min-YoungYoo-chum ParkYoo Ah-inSong Jong-ki

  1. Ok-tab-bang Wang-se-ja(2012)

15 | 65 min | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance

Crown Prince Yi gak finds that he has been transported from Chosun Dynasty to modern-day Seoul. He meets Hong Se Na, who bears a striking resemblance to his dead wife, and is determined to … See full summary »

Stars: Woo-Sik ChoiSeok-won JeongYu-mi JeongHan Ji-min

  1. Mai gel(2005–2006)

With a perpetually indebted father, Joo Yoo Rin learned to lie on the spot and get herself out of tricky situations, which gets Seal Gong Chan, a rich heir to a company, to hire her to impersonate his long lost cousin.

Stars: Lee Da-haveLee Dong-WookLee Joon-GiSi-Yeon Park

  1. Shining Inheritance(2009)

15 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

After losing her father Go Eunson’s stepmother kicks her and her autistic brother out of the house. Shortly after her brother is kidnapped. Eon-sung now has to look for her brother while also trying to find a job to survive.

Stars: Han Hyo-jookLee Seung-giMoon Chae-WonSoo-bin Bae

  1. 마이 프린세스(2011)

15 | 65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

Kim Tae-hee plays Lee Seal, an ordinary college student who finds out she’s a princess and the great-granddaughter of Korea’s last Emperor. But life can be complicated for a princess in this funny, quirky melodrama.

Stars: Song Seung-HeonKim Tae-heePark YeonSoo-young Ryu

  1. Angkeumhan Dashingly(2014– )

Na Ae-ra (Lee Min-Jung) and Cha Jung-woo (Joo Sang-wok) got married young. Ae-ra wanted to have steady life but Jung-woo business led them to lots of debt and hard work so she broke off … See full summary »

Stars: Lee Min-JungSang-UK Joo, Gyu-Ri, Seo Kang-Joon

  1. All About My Romance(2013– )

A conservative government party member falls for the feisty young leader of an upstart liberal party in this Korean romantic comedy.

Stars: Shin Ha-kinLee Min-JungHee-soon ParkChae-Ah Han

  1. Protect the Boss(2011)

TV-Y | 65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

After a long stretch of unemployment, No Eon Seol lands a job as secretary to Cha Ji Heon the youngest son of a rich family. However, her secretary duties go beyond the ordinary, helping her boss cope and function in normal society.

Stars: Gi-soo ByionHwa-Yeon ChaKang-hee ChoiJeong Gyu-Su

  1. The King 2 Hearts(2012)

15 | 65 min | Action, Drama, Romance

The crown prince of South Korea is forced to work alongside a female North Korean military officer. Political and emotional complications lead to an uneasy marriage engagement.

Stars: Lee Seung-giHa Ji-WonJo Jung-SukJason-Patrick Taylor

  1. Bool-up Eosin Jungyi(2013– )

15 | Drama, History, Romance

A Historical drama about Yoo Jung, also known as Jung Yi, the first female potter in the Joseon Dynasty and regarded as the dojo of Shin taro porcelain. ‘Yoo Jung’ is based on the real … See full summary »

Stars: Moon Geun-youngSang-Yoon LeeKim BumKeon-Hyeong Park

  1. Nae Yeojachinguneun Gumshoe(2010)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance

Chae Die Wong, an aspiring actor, unwillingly releases a Gumshoe, a legendary nine-tailed fox, from her centuries-old prison. He runs away terrified and ends up injuring himself badly, but she saves his life and asks him to stay by his side.

Stars: Shin Min-aLee Seung-giMin-woo NoPark Soo-Jin

Votes: 2,693

 

  1. Naege Geothermally Haebwa(2011)

15 | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.2

 

Rate

A woman, jealous when her friend steals her first love and marries him, lies that she is married too. The lie ensnares a hotel president who goes along with the lie for his reasons. Will the lie become reality?

Stars: Seung-us RyuYun Geun-hyeYun-hie JoSung Jun

Votes: 1,257

 

  1. Un-Myong-Cheol-eom neol sa-rang-hae(2014)

TV-14 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

7.9

 

Rate

A touching Korean drama filled with comedy about a girl who finds happiness, friendship, and love in the most unexpected way!

Stars: Jang HyukJang Na-raChoi Jin-Hyuk, churl

Votes: 2,036

 

  1. Shinai (2012)

60 min | Drama, Fantasy, History

8

 

Rate

When the queen-to-be of medieval Korea is badly wounded, Captain Choi Young uses a wormhole to “heaven,” which is 21st-century South Korea, to bring back the spoiled Dr. Yoo Eon-Soo who becomes a pawn in a game of human chess.

Stars: Kim Hee-seenYoon Kyun-SangLee Min-HoDeok-Hwan Ryu

Votes: 2,256

 

  1. The 1st Shop of Coffee Prince(2007)

15 | 55 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

8.2

 

Rate

A tomboy, mistaken for a lad, maintains the deception for the sake of employment. The situation becomes complicated when her male boss begins to develop feelings for this “boy.”

Stars: Gong YooYun Geun-HyeSun-Kyun LeeJeong-an Chae

Votes: 4,627

 

  1. 동이(2010)

TV-Y | 60 min | Drama, History, Romance

8

 

Rate

Story a simple maid that rises high in the royal harem as a consort and, ultimately, mother of the Korean king.

SARS: Han Hyo-JooJulia LimKim Yoo-JeongDa-Min Han

Votes: 1,349

 

  1. Love in the Moonlight(2016)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

The unlikely love story between a crown prince and his eunuch.

Stars: Park Bo-GumKim Yoo-JeongChae Soo-binKwak Dong-Yeon

Votes: 2,344

 

  1. She Was Pretty(2015)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

7.7

 

Rate

When Ji Sung-Joon was young, he was ugly. As he grew up, he began to have an attractive appearance. When Kim Hye-Jin was young, she was pretty. As she grew up, she became ugly. Ji Sung-Joon tries to find his first love.

Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeo Jun ParkJun-hee KoSi Won Choi

Votes: 4,025

 

  1. Bimal (2013)

15 | Drama, Romance

8.1

 

Rate

A devoted woman makes the ultimate sacrifice for her boyfriend, only to learn that love doesn’t always conquer all. Yoo Jeong (Hwang Jeong Elum) is a sweet, upbeat person who has always … See full summary »

Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeong JiSoo-bin BaeLee Da-hee

Votes: 1,031

 

  1. Naemsaereul Boneen Sonyeo(2015)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

7.1

 

Rate

Detective Tae Ho lost his younger sister to a barcode-murder case and lost his ability to taste, smell, and feel pain. He then meets Oh Cho Rim, the only witness to the murder case who possesses a special sense: she can see smells.

Stars: Yoo-chum ParkShin Se-KyungJin-Seo YoonMin Nakong

Votes: 1,023

 

  1. Sesang Eddied Eobneun Chakhan Namja(2012)

15 | 60 min | Drama

7.8

 

Rate

Kang Ma-Ru is a promising medical student until he takes the blame for a crime he didn’t commit. When he finds an opportunity for revenge, he takes it, using Seo Eon-Gi. Ma-Ru soon … See full summary »

Stars: Song Jong-kiMoon Chae-WonSi-Yeon ParkKwang-Soo Lee

Votes: 1,604

 

  1. Descendants of the Sun(2016)

TV-14 | 60 min | Action, Comedy, Drama

8.3

 

Rate

This drama tells of the love story that develops between a surgeon and a special forces officer.

Stars: Song Jong-kiSong Hye-KyoJin GooKim Ji-Won

Votes: 11,373

 

  1. Haideu, Jail, Na(2015)

15 | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7

 

Rate

Koo Seo-Jin (Hyun-Bin) has two different personalities. One of his personalities is cold like Hyde and the other is sweet like Jekyll.

Stars: Hyun BinHan Ji-minHee-Sung Kwak, Hyerim

Votes: 986

 

  1. O Ma-i Bi-neo-seu(2015–2016)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

A lawyer in her thirties coming out of a long relationship decides to regain her figure and health after meeting a renowned personal trainer who obsesses with leading a healthy lifestyle after suffering a serious injury in his childhood.

Stars: So Ji-sobShin Min-aSung HoonYoo In-young

Votes: 3,817

 

  1. Secret Garden(2010–2011)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

8.1

 

Rate

A rich young CEO falls for a poor stuntwoman despite class differences, cultural traditions, and the man’s firmly objecting mother.

Stars: Ha Ji-WonHyun BinYoon Sang-HyunSa-rang Kim

Votes: 5,961

 

  1. Gamy eon (2015)

15 | Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

Ji-sook facing a hard time because of her father’s debts and begin being chased by moneylenders. When a series of things happen Ji-sook has to live with Eon Ha’s identity (a Woman from an elite family) because she looks exactly like Eon Ha.

Stars: Soo AeJu Ji-HoonJeong-Hun YeonYoo In-young

Votes: 344

 

  1. Hungrier (2013– )

Not Rated | Drama, Romance

6.9

 

Rate

At 42-years-old, Kwon Yolo (Lee Beom Soo) is South Korea’s youngest prime minister ever. On top of his reputation of being an honest man of the utmost integrity, he’s also a widower who … See full summary »

Stars: Im Yoon-ah, us, Yoon Shi-YoonJeong-an Chae

Votes: 332

 

  1. Pool ha-woo-sue(2004)

TV-14 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

7.9

 

Rate

In a bid to reacquire her childhood home, a free-spirited woman agrees to a sham marriage with a selfish actor. Their daily lives are complicated by overlapping love triangles and comic misadventures.

Stars: Song Hye-KyoRain, Eun-Jeong, Seong-su Kim

Votes: 3,112

 

  1. Kawagoe (2005– )

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.6

 

Rate

Chun-Hyang is smart and sassy and becomes involved with good-looking Mongering. His first love Chae-rim enters the picture. An older man, Hak-do, pursues her. Will they find their way back to each other?

Stars: Chae-young HanHee JaeTae-wooing EdomSi-Eun Park

Votes: 442

 

  1. Mary Stayed Out All Night(2010)

65 min | Comedy, Drama, Music

6.8

 

Rate

Wi Mae Ri is the cheerful, pragmatic daughter of a failed businessman who had grown used to being constantly on the move to escape from loan sharks. She becomes fast friends with the … See full summary »

Stars: Moon Geun-young, Hyo-Jin, Kim Jae-WookHyo-jin Kim

Votes: 719

 

  1. City Hunter(2011)

TV-Y | 60 min | Action, Romance, Thriller

8.1

 

Rate

Lee Yun-song was trained by his father’s best friend to get revenge on the government for killing everyone in his father’s unit.

Stars: Lee Min-HoPark Min-YoungSang-Jung KimHo-jin Chun

Votes: 5,220

 

  1. Neon Neace Banhaesseo(2011)

65 min | Drama, Music, Romance

7.2

 

Rate

A series of misunderstandings causes Lee Shin, the cocky leader of “The Stupid” and Lee Guy-won, a student majoring in Traditional Korean Music to start on the wrong foot. Until she sees him performing live, and is immediately captivated.

Stars: Yong-hwa JungPark Shin-HyeChang-up SongYi-Hyeon So

Votes: 1,645

 

  1. Anderman (2015)

15 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama

7.6

 

Rate

This drama is about Jo Gang-JA, a mother who was known as a tough girl in high school. Her daughter Ah-ran is bullied at school and when Gang-JA finds out, she makes it her responsibility … See full summary »

Stars: Kim Hee-seenKim Yoo-JeongHyun-Woo JiJi Soo

Votes: 443

 

  1. Nae mi-eum-i deul-li-da(2011–)

65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

Can You Hear My Heart features Hallyu stars Kim Jae Won, Hwang Jung Elum, and Nam Goong Min in this romantic drama that shows us love in defiance of physical limitations? Dong Joo (played by … See full summary »

Stars: Jae-won KimHwang Jeong-elmMin NamkoongLee Hye-Yeong

Votes: 169

 

  1. Jang Ok-Jung, Sarang-e Salda(2013)

15 | Drama, History, Romance

7.5

 

Rate

Life Of Jang Ok Jung, Later Known as Jang Hee Bin, was one of the most famous Concubines of The Joseon Dynasty who was known for her hunger for power.

Stars: Kim Tae-heeYoo Ah-inGeon-Ju LeeSoo-Hyun Hong

Votes: 212

 

  1. Marriage Contract(2016)

15 | 75 min | Drama

7.6

 

Rate

Ji-Hoon (Lee Seo-Jin) has a cynical personality due to his family background. Even though he comes from a rich family, his mother had an affair with a married man and they had Ji-Hoon. From… See full summary »

Stars: Seo-jin LeeKim You-JinYoo-Ri KimKim Kwang-guy

Votes: 557

 

  1. Won-deo-pool la-i-pea(2005– )

Comedy, Romance

7.2

 

Rate

The story of Xu Tian who suffers big blows both in his love and work life. When he decides to leave America, where he has been living for 10 years, and returns to his home country, luck is not on his side.

Stars: Frank PowersJun-yong Choi, Eun-Jeong, Hyeon Ju

Votes: 106

 

  1. Dream High(2011–2012)

15 | 70 min | Comedy, Music, Romance

7.6

 

Rate

Dream High tells the story of six students at Kirin Art High School who work to achieve their dreams of becoming music stars in the Korean music industry. Go Hye Mi is a student who sings … See full summary »

Stars: J.Y. ParkJin-won JungJi-eon LeeKim Soo-Hyun

Votes: 2,549

 

  1. Personal Taste(2010)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.4

 

Rate

The surprise hit of 2010, Personal Taste (aka Personal Preference) garnered high ratings and a huge fanbase in a comedy that proves true love is found in the most unlikely places. Quirky … See full summary »

Stars: Son Ye-jinLee Min-HoNam-Gil KimJi-Seok Kim

Votes: 3,713

 

  1. Baegnyeon-ui Sibu(2014)

15 | 67 min | Drama, Fantasy, Romance

7.1

 

Rate

The Taeyang Corporation is the largest conglomerate in South Korea. The family that runs Taeyang has been under a curse for hundred years that the first bride of the eldest son will always … See full summary »

Stars: Jin-Sung YangHong-ki LeeJung-Hee Nam

DP

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

A gripping drama based on true events about life in the Korean military and why some soldiers run away from their obligations amid the constant harassment and strict discipline of the Korean military. This drama hit a nerve among many Koreans who recall their trouble times in the military. The military has announced that they are discontinuing the DP unit but swore it had nothing to do with this drama.

 

D.P. (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

D.P.
Promotional poster
Korean 디피
Genre Drama

Military

Based on D.P Dog’s Day
by Kim Bo-tong
Screenplay by Kim Bo-tong

Han Jun-hee

Directed by Han Jun-hee
Starring Jung Hae-in

Koo Kyo-hwan

Kim Sung-kyun

Son Seok-Koo

Composer Primary
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of episodes 6
Production
Executive producers Bien Seung-min

Han Jun-hee

Producer Kim Dong-min
Cinematography Yoo Ji-sun
Editor Park Min-sun
Running time 45–55 minutes
Production companies Climax Studio

Shortcake

Distributor Netflix
Release
Original network Netflix
Original release August 27, 2021

D.P. (an acronym for Deserter Pursuit) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Han Jun-hee, from a screenplay by Kim Bo-tong and Han, based on the Lezhin webtoon D.P Dog’s Day by Kim. The series stars Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-kyun, and Son Seok-Koo.[1][2] It premiered in six parts on Netflix on August 27, 2021.[3][4]

Synopsis[edit]

Set in 2014, D.P. tells the story of a team of Korean military police with their mission to catch deserters.

The series magnifies the undesirable nature of the military, especially within a South Korean context. The widespread bullying and hazing as well as the mindset for the “survival of the fittest” are rife, with those presumed the “weakest” thrown to the bottom of the pile and served horrifying experiences at the hands of their superiors and compatriots.

Private Ahn Joon-ho and Corporal Han Ho-Yul both team up to find the deserters, and end up on an adventurous journey.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

Jung Hae-in as Private Ahn Joon-ho

Koo Kyo-hwan as Corporal Han Ho-Yul

Kim Sung-Kyun as Sergeant First Class Park Bum-gu

Son Seok-Koo as Captain Im Ji-sup

Supporting[edit]

Jo Hyun-churl as Jo Suk-bong

Shin Seung-ho as Hwang Jang-soo

Park Se-joon as Heo Ki-young

Park Jung-woo as Shin Woo-suk

Kim Dong-young as Choi Joon-mok

Lee Jun-young as Jung Hyun-min

Choi Joon-young as Heo Chi-do

Moon Sang-hoon as Kim Roo-ri

Hyun Bong-sik as Chun Yong-duck

Hong Kyung as Ryu Yi-Kang

Bae Yoo-ram as Kim Kyu

Han Woo-Yul as Tae Sung-goon

Guest[edit]

Go Kyung-pyro as Corporal Park Sung-woo (Ep. 1)

Kwon Hae-Hyo as Ahn Joon-ho’s father (Eps. 1, 3–4)

Lee Seol as Shin Woo-Seok’s sister (Eps. 1 & 6)

Lee Jong-ok as an hinoeuma employee (Ep. 2)

Development[edit]

In late June 2020, Lashing officially announced that Lashing Studio and Homemade Film would co-produce a 6-part adaptation of the hit webtoon D.P: Dog Days by Kim Bo-tong, to be released exclusively through Netflix.[5][6] The story is based on Kim’s own experience during his mandatory military service.[7]

Director and co-writer Han Jun-hee had wanted to work on the webtoon’s adaptation “for five or six years [before he] finally got a chance” to do so.[8] Though Ahn Joon-ho is a Corporal in the webtoon, Han wanted him to be a Private in the series so people could “resonate with the story and consider Joon-ho as a friend who just started his military service.”[9]

Casting[edit]

On September 3, 2020, Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-Kyun, and Son Seok-Koo were confirmed to star in the series.[10][11] Koo’s character does not appear in the webtoon, which he found “hard but exciting to portray a character exclusive to the series.”[12] To prepare for his role, Koo received help from his road manager who was part of the D.P. team during his military service.[13] As for Jung, he practiced boxing for three months before filming began, to do his action scenes.[14]

Kim Bo-tong, who wrote the webtoon and co-wrote the series, commented that he “never dreamed of such a cast. They fit so perfectly into their roles that it seems like the roles were written for them.”[15]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography began in the summer of 2020.[16]

Reception[edit]

Audience viewership[edit]

Following its release, the series topped Netflix’s Top 10 in South Korea.[17]

Critical response[edit]

William Schwartz of Han Cinema praised Jung Hae-in‘s acting, commenting that he “is sublime here, in a brooding cinematic role radically different from the romances he’s better known for.” He added that “D.P. is worth watching, not just by people curious what South Korean mandatory military service is like, but anyone from any country who’s seriously thinking about joining up.”[18]

Pierce Conran of the South China Morning Post gave the series a 4.5/5 rating, noting that “D.P. hits home with a story that spans the past and present, as it acknowledges that yesterday’s problems can still be today’s.” He also praised the cinematography as well as Jung and Koo’s “electric chemistry”.[19] Daniel Hart of Ready Steady Cut also rated the series 4.5 stars out of 5, describing it as “the finest K-Drama mini-series this year.”[20]

Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek rated the series 4.3/5, noting that “D.P. is a stunning Korean drama [which] takes an unflinching look at bullying, the effect it has on mental health and larger societal questions about the mandatory military service in Korea” and praising the series for its “impressive” cinematography and for the way it “explore[s] a very sensitive and prevalent topic in a raw, artistic and unflinching way.”[21]

In a mixed review, Hitzig Jumaine of NME gave the series a 3/5 rating, commenting that “Kim Bo-tong and Han Jun-hee must be given credit for how this series tackles such extraordinarily difficult and tragic subject matter with compassion and sensitivity”, and praising the “uniformly excellent performances, splendid cinematography, addictive pacing, and intrepid commitment to shedding light on the appalling culture of bullying in the military”, but criticizing the “weak characterization [of the] three main leads” as well as the “ludicrous escalation of events during its climax, which suddenly turns a fairly grounded show into a melodramatic action thriller.”[22]

 

 

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

 

Squid Games

 

The top show on Netflix is not only in the US but also in Korea.  Reminiscent of both the “Maze”,  the “Hunger Games”, and the” Cube “ but done in a K Drama way. And addictive!

 

 

Squid Game

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

navigation Jump

Squid Game
Promotional poster
Also known as Round Six
Hangul 오징어게임
Revised Romanization Owing-ego Gem
McCune–Reischauer Jingo Kemi
Genre Actionadventure

Suspense

Survival

Drama

Created by Netflix
Written by Hwang Dong-hyuk
Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk
Starring Lee Jung-Jae

Park Hae-soo

Wi Ha-joon

Composer Jung Jae-il
Country of origin South Korea
Original language Korean
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 9 (list of episodes)
Production
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 32–63 minutes
Production company Siren Pictures Inc.[1]
Distributor Netflix
Release
Original network Netflix
Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

Dolby visión

Audio format Dolby Atmos
Original release September 17, 2021

Squid Game (Korean: 오징어게임; RR: Jingle Gem) is a South Korean survival drama streaming television series written and directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk. The nine-episode series, starring Lee Jung-JaePark Hae-soo, and Wi Ha-Joon, tells the story of a group of people who risk their lives in a mysterious survival game with a 45.6 billion (US$38.7 million) prize.[2][3] It was released worldwide on September 17, 2021, by Netflix.[4][5]

Premise

Four hundred and fifty-six people, who have all struggled financially in life, are invited to play a mysterious survival competition. Competing in a series of traditional children’s games but with deadly twists, they risk their lives to compete for a 45.6 billion (US$38.5 million) prize.

Cast and characters

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Players

Main characters[6]

Lee Jung-Jae as Seong Gi-Hun (No. 456)[7]

A chauffeur and a gambling addict, he lives with his mother and struggles to financially support his daughter. He participates in the Game to settle his many debts.

Park Hae-soo as Cho Sang-woo (No. 218)

The head of the investment team at a securities company, he was a junior to Gi-Hun, and was a gifted student who entered Seoul National University, but is now wanted by the police for stealing money from his clients.

Oh Yeong-su as Oh Il-name (No. 001)

An elderly man with a brain tumor prefers playing the Game to waiting to die on the outside.

Hyeon Jung as Kang Sae-beak (No. 067)

North Korean defector enters the Game to pay for a broker that can find and retrieve her surviving family members from the country.

Heo Sung-tea as Jang Deok-su (No. 101)

A gangster enters the Game to settle his massive gambling debts.

Anupam Tripathi as Abdul Ali (No. 199)

A foreign worker from Pakistan enters the Game to provide for his young family after his employer refuses to pay him for months.

Kim Joo-young as Han Mi-nyao (No. 212)

A mysterious and manipulative woman who claims to be a poor single mother.[8]

Supporting characters

Yoo Sung-joo as Byeong-gi (No. 111)

A doctor secretly works with a group of corrupt guards trafficking dead participants’ organs in exchange for information on upcoming games.

Lee Yoo-mi as Ji-Yeong (No. 240)

A young woman was just released from prison after killing her abusive father.

Kim Si-Hyun as No. 244

A pastor who finds his faith again in the Game.

Minor characters

Lee Sang-hee as No. 017

A glass-maker with more than 30 years’ experience.

Kim Yun-tea as No. 069

A player who joins the Game with his wife, No. 070

Lee Ji-ha as No. 070

A player who joins the game with her husband, No. 069

Kwak Ja-young as No. 278

A player who joins Deok-sun’s group and acts as his henchman.

Chris Chan / Chris Lag hit[9] as No. 276

A player who joins Seong Gi-Hun’s group on the Tug of War round.

Game staff

Gong Yoo is a salesman who recruits participants for the Game (Special appearance, Episodes 1 and 9)[10]

Lee Byung-Hun as The Front Man (Special appearance, Episodes 8–9)

Civilians

Main characters

Wi Ha-joon as Hwang Jun-ho[11]

A police officer sneaks into the Game to find his missing brother.

Supporting characters

Kim Young-ok as Gi-Hun’s mother

Cho Ah-in as Seong Ga-Yeong, Gi-Hun’s daughter

Kang Mal-gum as Gi-Hun’s ex-wife and Ga-Yeong’s mother

Park Hye-jin as Sang-woo’s mother

Park Si-wan as Kang Cheol, Sae-book’s brother

English cast (dubbing)

Greg Chun as Seong Gi-Hun

Stephen Fu as Cho Sang-woo

Paul Nakache as Jang Deok-su

Hideo Kimura as Oh Il-name

Vivian Lu as Kang Sae-beak

Rama Valéry as Abdul Ali

Tom Choi as Front Man

Donald Chang as Hwang Jun-ho

Stephanie Komura as Han Mi-nyao

Yuki Luna as Ji-yeong

Cosmos’s Commentary:

 

 

Move to Heaven is a heart-wrenching drama about a “Rain man” like character who worked with his father in a trauma clean-up business cleaning up after the recently deceased.  His father dies and his father’s deadbeat brother shows up as his guardian.

 

Move to Heaven (Korean: 무브 투 헤븐: 나는 유품정리사입니다; RR: Mubeen to hereon: Naneun yupumjeongnisaimnida) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Kim Sung-ho and written by Yoon Ji-rye on. It is an original Netflix series, starring Lee Je-hoonTang Joon-sangJi Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee. The series follows Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), a young man with Asperger syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), his guardian. Working as trauma cleaners, they uncover untold stories.[1][2] The series was released worldwide by Netflix on May 14, 2021.[3]

 

 

 

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A tomboy, mistaken for a lad, maintains the deception for the sake of employment. The situation becomes complicated when her male boss begins to develop feelings for this “boy.”

Stars: Gong YooYun Geun-HyeSun-Kyun LeeJeong-an Chae

Votes: 4,627

 

  1. 동이(2010)

TV-Y | 60 min | Drama, History, Romance

8

 

Rate

Story a simple maid that rises high in the royal harem as a consort and, ultimately, mother of the Korean king.

SARS: Han Hyo-JooJulia LimKim Yoo-JeongDa-Min Han

Votes: 1,349

 

  1. Love in the Moonlight(2016)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

The unlikely love story between a crown prince and his eunuch.

Stars: Park Bo-GumKim Yoo-JeongChae Soo-binKwak Dong-Yeon

Votes: 2,344

 

  1. She Was Pretty(2015)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

7.7

 

Rate

When Ji Sung-Joon was young, he was ugly. As he grew up, he began to have an attractive appearance. When Kim Hye-Jin was young, she was pretty. As she grew up, she became ugly. Ji Sung-Joon tries to find his first love.

Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeo Jun ParkJun-hee KoSi Won Choi

Votes: 4,025

 

  1. Bimal (2013)

15 | Drama, Romance

8.1

 

Rate

A devoted woman makes the ultimate sacrifice for her boyfriend, only to learn that love doesn’t always conquer all. Yoo Jeong (Hwang Jeong Elum) is a sweet, upbeat person who has always … See full summary »

Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeong JiSoo-bin BaeLee Da-hee

Votes: 1,031

 

  1. Naemsaereul Boneen Sonyeo(2015)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

7.1

 

Rate

Detective Tae Ho lost his younger sister to a barcode-murder case and lost his ability to taste, smell, and feel pain. He then meets Oh Cho Rim, the only witness to the murder case who possesses a special sense: she can see smells.

Stars: Yoo-chum ParkShin Se-KyungJin-Seo YoonMin Nakong

Votes: 1,023

 

  1. Sesang Eddied Eobneun Chakhan Namja(2012)

15 | 60 min | Drama

7.8

 

Rate

Kang Ma-Ru is a promising medical student until he takes the blame for a crime he didn’t commit. When he finds an opportunity for revenge, he takes it, using Seo Eon-Gi. Ma-Ru soon … See full summary »

Stars: Song Jong-kiMoon Chae-WonSi-Yeon ParkKwang-Soo Lee

Votes: 1,604

 

  1. Descendants of the Sun(2016)

TV-14 | 60 min | Action, Comedy, Drama

8.3

 

Rate

This drama tells of the love story that develops between a surgeon and a special forces officer.

Stars: Song Jong-kiSong Hye-KyoJin GooKim Ji-Won

Votes: 11,373

 

  1. Haideu, Jail, Na(2015)

15 | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7

 

Rate

Koo Seo-Jin (Hyun-Bin) has two different personalities. One of his personalities is cold like Hyde and the other is sweet like Jekyll.

Stars: Hyun BinHan Ji-minHee-Sung Kwak, Hyerim

Votes: 986

 

  1. O Ma-i Bi-neo-seu(2015–2016)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

A lawyer in her thirties coming out of a long relationship decides to regain her figure and health after meeting a renowned personal trainer who obsesses with leading a healthy lifestyle after suffering a serious injury in his childhood.

Stars: So Ji-sobShin Min-aSung HoonYoo In-young

Votes: 3,817

 

  1. Secret Garden(2010–2011)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

8.1

 

Rate

A rich young CEO falls for a poor stuntwoman despite class differences, cultural traditions, and the man’s firmly objecting mother.

Stars: Ha Ji-WonHyun BinYoon Sang-HyunSa-rang Kim

Votes: 5,961

 

  1. Gamy eon (2015)

15 | Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

Ji-sook facing a hard time because of her father’s debts and begin being chased by moneylenders. When a series of things happen Ji-sook has to live with Eon Ha’s identity (a Woman from an elite family) because she looks exactly like Eon Ha.

Stars: Soo AeJu Ji-HoonJeong-Hun YeonYoo In-young

Votes: 344

 

  1. Hungrier (2013– )

Not Rated | Drama, Romance

6.9

 

Rate

At 42-years-old, Kwon Yolo (Lee Beom Soo) is South Korea’s youngest prime minister ever. On top of his reputation of being an honest man of the utmost integrity, he’s also a widower who … See full summary »

Stars: Im Yoon-ah, us, Yoon Shi-YoonJeong-an Chae

Votes: 332

 

  1. Pool ha-woo-sue(2004)

TV-14 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

7.9

 

Rate

In a bid to reacquire her childhood home, a free-spirited woman agrees to a sham marriage with a selfish actor. Their daily lives are complicated by overlapping love triangles and comic misadventures.

Stars: Song Hye-KyoRain, Eun-Jeong, Seong-su Kim

Votes: 3,112

 

  1. Kawagoe (2005– )

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.6

 

Rate

Chun-Hyang is smart and sassy and becomes involved with good-looking Mongering. His first love Chae-rim enters the picture. An older man, Hak-do, pursues her. Will they find their way back to each other?

Stars: Chae-young HanHee JaeTae-wooing EdomSi-Eun Park

Votes: 442

 

  1. Mary Stayed Out All Night(2010)

65 min | Comedy, Drama, Music

6.8

 

Rate

Wi Mae Ri is the cheerful, pragmatic daughter of a failed businessman who had grown used to being constantly on the move to escape from loan sharks. She becomes fast friends with the … See full summary »

Stars: Moon Geun-young, Hyo-Jin, Kim Jae-WookHyo-jin Kim

Votes: 719

 

  1. City Hunter(2011)

TV-Y | 60 min | Action, Romance, Thriller

8.1

 

Rate

Lee Yun-song was trained by his father’s best friend to get revenge on the government for killing everyone in his father’s unit.

Stars: Lee Min-HoPark Min-YoungSang-Jung KimHo-jin Chun

Votes: 5,220

 

  1. Neon Neace Banhaesseo(2011)

65 min | Drama, Music, Romance

7.2

 

Rate

A series of misunderstandings causes Lee Shin, the cocky leader of “The Stupid” and Lee Guy-won, a student majoring in Traditional Korean Music to start on the wrong foot. Until she sees him performing live, and is immediately captivated.

Stars: Yong-hwa JungPark Shin-HyeChang-up SongYi-Hyeon So

Votes: 1,645

 

  1. Anderman (2015)

15 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama

7.6

 

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This drama is about Jo Gang-JA, a mother who was known as a tough girl in high school. Her daughter Ah-ran is bullied at school and when Gang-JA finds out, she makes it her responsibility … See full summary »

Stars: Kim Hee-seenKim Yoo-JeongHyun-Woo JiJi Soo

Votes: 443

 

  1. Nae mi-eum-i deul-li-da(2011–)

65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.8

 

Rate

Can You Hear My Heart features Hallyu stars Kim Jae Won, Hwang Jung Elum, and Nam Goong Min in this romantic drama that shows us love in defiance of physical limitations? Dong Joo (played by … See full summary »

Stars: Jae-won KimHwang Jeong-elmMin NamkoongLee Hye-Yeong

Votes: 169

 

  1. Jang Ok-Jung, Sarang-e Salda(2013)

15 | Drama, History, Romance

7.5

 

Rate

Life Of Jang Ok Jung, Later Known as Jang Hee Bin, was one of the most famous Concubines of The Joseon Dynasty who was known for her hunger for power.

Stars: Kim Tae-heeYoo Ah-inGeon-Ju LeeSoo-Hyun Hong

Votes: 212

 

  1. Marriage Contract(2016)

15 | 75 min | Drama

7.6

 

Rate

Ji-Hoon (Lee Seo-Jin) has a cynical personality due to his family background. Even though he comes from a rich family, his mother had an affair with a married man and they had Ji-Hoon. From… See full summary »

Stars: Seo-jin LeeKim You-JinYoo-Ri KimKim Kwang-guy

Votes: 557

 

  1. Won-deo-pool la-i-pea(2005– )

Comedy, Romance

7.2

 

Rate

The story of Xu Tian who suffers big blows both in his love and work life. When he decides to leave America, where he has been living for 10 years, and returns to his home country, luck is not on his side.

Stars: Frank PowersJun-yong Choi, Eun-Jeong, Hyeon Ju

Votes: 106

 

  1. Dream High(2011–2012)

15 | 70 min | Comedy, Music, Romance

7.6

 

Rate

Dream High tells the story of six students at Kirin Art High School who work to achieve their dreams of becoming music stars in the Korean music industry. Go Hye Mi is a student who sings … See full summary »

Stars: J.Y. ParkJin-won JungJi-eon LeeKim Soo-Hyun

Votes: 2,549

 

  1. Personal Taste(2010)

15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

7.4

 

Rate

The surprise hit of 2010, Personal Taste (aka Personal Preference) garnered high ratings and a huge fanbase in a comedy that proves true love is found in the most unlikely places. Quirky … See full summary »

Stars: Son Ye-jinLee Min-HoNam-Gil KimJi-Seok Kim

Votes: 3,713

 

  1. gnyeon-ui Sibu(2014)Over the last few years, I finally became a K Drama fan.  Part of the reason is that my Korean is now good enough to mostly follow the dialogue although I still need subtitles.  Second, because of COVID, we’ve been mostly at home in Korea, and third, I finally just got into K Drama.  I know a bit late, but what the heck.Here are some of my favorite K Dramas-  I provide a synopsis and my comment on each.

     

    In general K Dramas come in two forms – movies and series. The series are reminiscent of Mexican telenovela – usually 16 episodes, occasionally 20, and occasionally fewer.  A few have two seasons.  Most run for about a month.  Almost all are available now on Netflix and Hulu with English sub-titles.   A few were quite controversial.

     

    Parasite of course won the 2020 Oscar.  And Minuri won best-supporting actress this year.

     

    My favorites  K Dramas so far include:

     

    Crash Landing on You

    Vincenzo,” “

    Mine”,

    “Move to Heaven”

    “Parasite”,

    ‘DP,”

    Camilla Blooming.”

    Itaewon Class

    Stranger

    Mr. Sunshine

    Last Man Standing

    Mad About You

     

     

    Others Worth Watching

     

    Memories of the Alhambra

    The Negotiation (film)

    Sisyphus: The Myth (2021)

    Space Sweepers K SF Drama

    The Last Man Standing K Drama

    Heist – not a K Drama, more of an S Drama but pretty good, but went on too long.  Should have ended with the first season.  There were lots of unanswered questions –

    Mr. Kim’s convenience

     

    Yet to Watch

     

    Minuri Movie

    Sky Castle

    Kingdom (South Korean TV series)

    Signal (South Korean TV series)

    My Mister

    Hospital Playlist

    Flower of Evil

     

    Synopsis and Comments  (from Wikpedia and other sources)

     

    Parasite  2020 Best Picture Oscar

     

    Parasite (Korean: 기생충; Hanja: 寄生蟲; RR: Guangcheng) is a 2019 South Korean black comedy thriller film directed by Bong Joon-ho, who co-wrote the screenplay with Han Jin-won. The film, starring Song Kang-hoLee Sun-KyunCho Yeo-JeongChoi Woo-ShakPark So-damJang Hye-jin, and Lee Jung-Eun, follows a poor family who schemes to become employed by a wealthy family and infiltrate their household by posing as unrelated, highly qualified individuals.

    Parasite premiered at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival on 21 May 2019, where it became the first South Korean film to win the Palme d’Or. It was then released in South Korea by CJ Entertainment on 30 May 2019. The film was considered by many critics to be the best film of 2019. It grossed over $258 million worldwide on a production budget of about $15.5 million.

    Among its numerous accolades, Parasite won a leading four awards at the 92nd Academy AwardsBest PictureBest DirectorBest Original Screenplay, and Best International Feature Film, becoming the first non-English language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.[note 1]

    Parasite is the first South Korean film to receive Academy Award recognition and one of three films to win both the Palme d’Or and the Academy Award for Best Picture.[note 2] It won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film and the BAFTA Award for Best Film Not in the English Language, and became the first non-English language film to win the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. At the 56th Grand Bell Awards and the 40th Blue Dragon Film Awards, Parasite had eleven nominations with five wins. At the 56th Buesking Arts Awards, it had twelve nominations with three wins. Joon-Ho has confirmed a TV series is in the works while two sequels are also planned.

     

    The Kim family—father Ki-take, mother Chung-sook, daughter Ki-Jung, and son Ki-woo—live in a small semi-basement apartment (banjara),[10] have low-paying temporary jobs as pizza box folders, and struggle to make ends meet.[11] University student Min-hyuk, a friend of Ki-woo’s, gives the family a scholar’s rock meant to promise wealth. Leaving to study abroad and knowing his friend needs the income, he suggests that Ki-woo poses as a university student to take over his job as an English tutor for the daughter of the wealthy park family, Da-Hye. Ki-woo, presenting himself as a Yonsei University student, is subsequently hired by the Parks.

    The Kim family schemes to get each member of the family a job by posing as unrelated and highly qualified workers to become servants of the Parks. Ki-Jung poses as “Jessica” and, using Ki-Woo as a reference, becomes an art therapist to the Parks’ young son, Da-song. Ki-Jung frames Yoon, Mr. Park’s chauffeur, for having sex in the car, then recommends Ki-take replace him. Finally, Chung-sook takes over as the Parks’ housekeeper after the Kim’s exploit the peach allergy of the long-time housekeeper, Moon-gang, to convince Mrs. Park that she has tuberculosis. Ki-woo begins a secret romantic relationship with Da-Hye.

    When the Parks leave on a camping trip, the Kim’s revel in the luxuries of their residence before Moon-gang abruptly appears at the door, telling Chung-sook she has left something in the basement. She enters a hidden entrance to an underground bunker created by the architect and previous homeowner, where Moon-Hwang’s husband, Geun-SAE, has been secretly living for over four years, hiding from loan sharks. Chung-sook refuses Moon-Hwang’s pleas to help Geun-SAE remain in the bunker, but the eavesdropping Kim’s accidentally reveal themselves. Moon-gang films them on her phone and threatens to expose their ruse to the Parks.

     

    A severe rainstorm brings the Parks home early, and the Kim’s scramble to clean up the home and subdue Moon-gang and Geun-SAE before they return. The Kim’s trap Geun-SAE and Moon-gang in the bunker. Mrs. Park reveals to Chung-sook that Da-song had a seizure-inducing traumatic experience on a previous birthday when he saw a “ghost” — actually Geun-SAE — emerging from the basement at night. Before the Kim’s manage to sneak out of the house, they hear Mr. Park’s off-handed comments about Ki-take’s smell. The Kim’s find their apartment flooded with sewer water and are forced to shelter in a gymnasium with other displaced people.

     

    The next day, Mrs. Park hosts a house party for Da-song’s birthday with the Kim family’s help. Ki-woo enters the bunker with the scholar’s rock to find Geun-SAE. Finding Moon-gang has died from a concussion she received during the earlier fight, he is attacked by Geun-SAE, who bludgeons his head with the rock and escapes, leaving Ki-woo lying in a pool of blood in the basement. Seeking to avenge Moon-gang, Geun-SAE stabs Ki-Jung with a kitchen knife in front of the horrified party guests. Da-song suffers another seizure upon seeing Geun-SAE, and a struggle breaks out until Chung-sook fatally impales Geun-SAE with a barbecue skewer. While Ki-take tends to a severely bleeding Ki-Jung, Mr. Park orders Ki-take to drive Da-song to the hospital. In the chaos, Ki-take, upon seeing Mr. Park’s disgusted reaction to Geun-SAE’s smell, angrily takes the knife and kills him. Ki-take then flees the scene, leaving behind the rest of the Kim family.

    Weeks later, Ki-woo is recovering from brain surgery. He and Chung-sook are convicted of fraud and put on probation. Ki-Jung has died and Ki-take, wanted by the police for Mr. Park’s murder, cannot be found. Geun-SAE has been assumed to be an insane homeless man, and neither his nor Ki-take’s motive for the stabbings is known. Ki-woo spies on the Parks’ home, now sold to a German family unaware of its history and sees a message in Morse code from a flickering light. Ki-take, who escaped into the bunker via the garage, has buried Moon-gang in the backyard and now raids the kitchen at night and flickers the light every day, hoping to Ki-woo will see it. Still living in their original basement apartment with his mother, Ki-woo writes a letter to Ki-take, vowing to earn enough money to one day purchase the house and reunite with his father.

    Cast[edit]

    Song Kang-ho as Kim Ki-take (Mr. Kim; 김기택; Gym Gitau), the father of the Kim family who is hired as Park Dong-ik’ s chauffeur.

    Choi Woo-Shak as Kim Ki-woo (Kevin; 김기우; Gym Gou), the son of the Kim family who is hired as Da-Hye’s English tutor. Choi Woo-Shak stated that the character is intelligent but does not have the vigor needed to succeed in examinations.[12]

    Lee Sun-kyun as Park Dong-ik (Nathan; 박동익; Bak Dongguk), the father of the Park family.

    Cho Yeo-Jeong as Choi Yeon-go (Madame; 최연교; Choe Yeong), the mother of the Park family.

    Park So-dam as Kim Ki-Jung (Jessica; 김기정; Gym Gijon), the daughter of the Kim family who is hired as Da-song’s art therapist.

    Lee Jung-Eun as Gook Moon-gang (국문광; Guk Mungkan), the housekeeper for the Park family, who also worked for the architect and previous owner of the house. Bong Joon-ho said her relationship with the architect and parts of her story “that happen in between the sequences in the film” will be explored in the spin-off television series.[13]

    Jang Hye-jin as Chung-sook (박충숙; Bak Chung Suk), the mother of the Kim family who is hired as the housekeeping for the Park family.

    Park Myung-hoon as Oh Geun-SAE (오근세; O Genes), Moon-Hwang’s husband.

    Jung Ji-so as Park Da-Hye (박다혜; Bak Daye), the daughter of the Park family.

    Jung Hyeon-Jun as Park Da-song (박다송; Bak Datong), the son of the Park family.

    Park Konerko as Yoon (윤; Yun), Park Dong-ik’ s chauffeur.

    Park Seo-Joon as Min-hyuk (민혁; Miyoko), Ki-woo’s friend.[14]

     

    Crashlanding on you

     

    program.tving.com/ton/cloy

    Crash Landing on You is a 2019–2020 South Korean television series written by Park Ji-Eun, directed by Lee Jeong-Hyo, and starring Hyun Bin, Son Ye-jin, Kim Jung-Hyun, and Seo Ji-Hye. It is about a South Korean chaebol heiress who, while paragliding in Seoul, South Korea, is swept up in a sudden storm, crash-lands in the North Korean portion of the DMZ, and meets a captain in the Korean People’s Army. Over time, they fall in love, despite the divide and dispute between their respective countries. Wikipedia

    Genre: Romantic Drama, Romantic comedy

    Created by: Studio Dragon

    Written by: Park Ji-Eun

     

    Comments:

     

    One of my favorites.  It is a classic rom-com opposite attract theme.   Almost a Romeo and Juliet star crossed lovers theme with the division of the Korean peninsula separating the lovers.   When Captain Ri meets Se-Yeong who literary crash lands on him after a freak paragliding accident took over the DMZ, has to decide to risk everything to save her life and return her to South Korea or turn her in as duty would dictate.  He chose to follow his heart and enlists the aid of his squad of soldiers who all fall in love with her as well. She also becomes friendly with the local woman in the village.

     

    When a notorious gangster follows her to Seoul to kill her to take revenge on Captain Ri, Captain Ri and his squad follow her to save her and bring down the gangsters.  I won’t say more than that.

     

    This series led the North Koreans to blow up the inter-Korean liaison office as they saw the movie as an insult to the North.  Some southern politicians denounced it as being too sympathetic to the North. It also of course featured rich people behaving badly in both the North and the South.  – Common theme in most K dramas these days.

     

    And a sub-romance between the captain’s soon-to-be-ex and Se-Young Ex who is End Comments con artist who is hiding out in the north after defrauding her father and brother.

     

    End Comment

     

     

    Vincenzo (2021)

     

    Comment:

     

    another one of my favorites.  A Korean child is adopted by an Italian family who has mob connections.  He graduates from Law School and becomes a lawyer to a Mafia family.  He hides millions of dollars in gold bullion in an office building in South Korea.  Hidden within the gold is a secret file on secrets of all the main corporations and political leaders in Korea known as the Guillotine file.  Vengeance goes to Korea to recover the money after the godfather dies.  The building tenants are being evicted by an evil corporation that wants to build their headquarters in their centrally located plaza.  The tenants are being led by a lawyer.  When he dies his daughter takes up the fight.  She enlists the aid of Vincenzo who teaches her how to do things the mafia way.  The usual rich family is behaving badly scenario, political corruption, etc.  And a slow-burning love affair.  The main villain is a real sociopath, which is also a common theme in Korean dramas nowadays.  There is also an implied LGBT theme – as Vengeance is a very attractive man and both men and women try to seduce him.  Another villain is a corrupt ex-prosecutor who goes to work for the evil Babel corporation and its sociopathic young secret chairman.  He had been exiled to Canada as a young man when he killed a number of his classmates after witnessing his father being left to die by his mother.  End comment

     

    At the age of eight, Park Joo Hyeong went to Italy after being adopted. Now an adult, he is known as Vincenzo Casino to the Mafia, who employ him as a consigliere. Because mafia factions are at war with each other, he flees to South Korea, where he gets involved with Lawyer Hong Cha Young. She is the type of attorney who will do anything to win a case. Now back at his motherland, he gives an unrivaled conglomerate a taste of its own medicine with a side of justice. (Source: Netflix, Asianizing) Edit Translation

    English

    Vincenzo: Special (Korean compilation)

     

    Native Title: 빈센조

    Also Known as Basenji

    Screenwriter: Park Jae Bum

    Director: Kim Hee Won

    Genres: ComedyLawCrimeDrama

    Tags: LawyerRevengeEccentric Female LeadMafiaSmart Male LeadInjusticeCompetent ProtagonistFather-Daughter RelationshipCharming Male LeadFunny Female Lead (Vote or add tags)

    Where to Watch Vincenzo

    Netflix

    Subscription (sub)

    Cast & Credits

    Add Cast

    Song Jong Ki

    Vincenzo Casino / Park Joo Hyung

    Main Role

    Jeon Yeo Bin

    Hong Cha Young

    Main Role

    Ok Teac Yeon

    Jang Jun Woo

    Main Role

    Kim Yeo Jin

    Choi Myung Hee [Prosecutor]

    Support Role

    Jo Han Chula

    Han Seung Hyuk [CEO of Woosung Law firm]

    Support Role

    Kwak Dong Yeon

    Jang Han Seo [Head of Babel Group]

    Support Role

    View all (119)

    Photos

    View all (355)

     

    Sisyphus

     

     

    Mine”,

     

    Comment

     

    One of my recent favorites.  Almost a poster child for the rich family behaving badly theme. An interesting LBGT romance sub-theme as well. Another Romeo-Juliet Cinderella romance sub-plot as well.  The main protagonist is a real sociopath.  The story revolves around his murder and who wanted him dead the most. Well, everyone hated him, everyone wanted him dead.  The suspense was kept alive to the very end. The other theme is the two sisters-in-laws who battle the family and in the end, prevail against all the odds to come out on top and regain what they saw as “Mine” hence the title.  Very well done.

     

     

    Mine (TV series) – Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mine_(TV_series)

    Mine (Korean: 마인) is a 2021 South Korean television series directed by Lee Na-Jung and starring Lee Bo-young, Kim Seo-Hyung, Lee Hyun-Wook, and Ok Ja-Yeon. It revolves around strong women who free themselves from the prejudice of society and find their real ‘mine’. It also peeps into the mysterious lives of wealthy people. The series premiered ten on May 8, 2021, and aired every …

    Mine (Korean Drama) – AsianWiki

    https://asianwiki.com/Mine_(Korean_Drama)

    Profile. Drama: my Revised romanization: my Hangul: 마인 Director: Lee Na-Jeong Writer: Baek Mi-Kong Network: tvN Episodes: 16 Reléase Date: May 8 – June 27, 2021, Run time: Sat. & Sun. 21:00 Language: Korean Country: South Korea Plot Synopsis by Asianizing Staff ©

    Mine (2021) – Dramatist

    https://mydramalist.com/75937-blue-diamond

    Mine (2021) Mine. (2021) “Mine” is about strong and ambitious women who overcome the world’s prejudices to find their true selves. Seo Hee-Soo was a former top actress, but she gave up her career to marry the second son of Hyo Won Group. She does her best to fit in as a daughter-in-law of that family.

    Mine | Netflix Official Site

    https://www.netflix.com/title/81403973

    Mine. 2021 | TV-14 | 1 Season | TV Dramas. Encaged in a gold-clad life of secrets and lies, two women in a conglomerate family seek to topple all that stands in their way of finding true joy. Starring: Lee Bo-young, Kim Seo-Hyung, Lee Hyun-Wook.

    Mine (2021) – Full Cast & Crew – Dramatist

    https://mydramalist.com/75937-blue-diamond/cast

    Today, we present some unexpected cameo appearances in K-Dramas by popular actors and actresses. Get Ready to Be Enrolled in the “Police University” of 2021 News – Aug 1, 2021

    Images for mine k drama

    More Images for my k drama

    Stream It or Skip It: ‘Mine’ On Netflix, A Soapy K-Drama …

    https://decider.com/2021/05/10/mine-netflix-review/

    It’s harder to compare Mine to a current K-drama, but it sure does have the feel of a good old-fashioned American primetime soap like Dallas or Dynasty, with some hints of Succession mixed in.

    “Mine” (2021 Drama): Cast & Summary | Koopman

    https://www.kpopmap.com/mine-2021-drama-cast-summary/

    Information. Title: Mine / 마인 Director: Lee Nanjing Writer: Baek MiKyung. Network: ten x Netflix. Runtime: From May 8 # of Episodes: 16. Genre: Mystery, Thriller, Human Language: Korean. Summary. Encaged in a gold-clad life of secrets and lies, two women in a conglomerate family seek to topple all that stands in their way of finding true joy.

    Korean Drama “Mine” (Synopsis + Cast + Preview) – Korean …

    https://koreanallday.com/2021/05/09/korean-drama-mine-synopsis-cast-preview/

    Korean Drama “Mine” (Synopsis + Cast + Preview) May 9, 2021. admin “Mine” (or “Blue Diamond”) is a ten original drama series that was released on 8 May 2021 and is available to watch online on Netflix*. SYNOPSIS “Mine” drama story will center around two strong and married women Seo Hee-Soo and Jung Seo Hyun. They both are married …

    Mine episode 16 recap – the finale/ending explained – Ji …

    https://readysteadycut.com/2021/06/27/recap-mine-season-1-episode-16-finale-ending-netflix-k-drama-series/

    3.5. Summary. The finale of Mine wraps up the story nicely — episode 16 reveals the killer and gives the audience a taste of life after Ji-yong. There are strong themes of female empowerment in the finale that works well, in the story’s conclusion. This recap of the Netflix k-drama series Mine season 1, episode 16 — the finale/ending …

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    Drama: Mine

    Revised romanization: Mine

    Hangul: 마인

    Director: Lee Na-Jeong

    Writer: Baek Mi-Kyong

    Network: tyvm

    Episodes: 16

    Release Date: May 8 – June 27, 2021

    Runtime: Sat. & Sun. 21:00

    Language: Korean

    Country: South Korea

    Plot Synopsis by Asianizing Staff ©

    A story of women who try to find their true selves, freeing themselves from prejudices in the world.

    Seo Hi-Soo (Lee Bo-Young) was a star actress, but she gave up her career to marry the second son of a chaebol family. The chaebol family runs the Hyowon Group. She does her best to fit in as a daughter-in-law of that family. She acts confidently all the time to not lose her true self.

    Jung Seo-Hyun (Kim Seo-Hyung) is married to the first son of the same chaebol family. She is also the daughter of a chaebol family. She is elegant and intelligent. She is also very rational.

    Notes

    “Mine” takes over TV N’s Sat. & Sun. 21:00 time slot previously occupied by “Vincenzo” and followed by “The Devil Judge” on July 3, 2021.

    Cast

    Hyowon Group’s Family

    Lee Bo-Young Kim Seo-Hyung
    Seo Hi-Soo Jung Seo-Hyun

     

    Lee Hyun-Wook Jeong Hyun-Jun Park Hyuk-Kwon Cha Hak-Yeon
    Han Ji-Yong Han Ha-Joon Han Jin-Ho Han Soo-Hyuk

     

    Park Won-Suk Jeong Dong-Hwan Kim Hye-Hwa Jo Eon-Sol
    Yang Soon-Hye Chairman Han Suk-Chula Han Jin-Hee Park Jung-Do

    Hyowon Mansion’s Staff

    Ok Ja-Yeon Jung Yi-Seo
    Kang Ja-Kyong / Lee Hye-Jin Kim Yu-Yeon

     

    Park Sung-Yeon Lee Jong-Ok Jo Yun-Seo Kim Nam-Jin Yoon Gemstone
    Joo Min-Su Kim Seung-Tae Secretary Oh Soo-Young Ko Mi-Jin Hwang Kyung-Hye

     

    Son Hyun-Ji Yeon Bo-Ra Song Young-A Kim Sang-Hoon Lee Eon-Kang
    Lee Ju-Hee Woo Ju-Yeon Min Sang-A vocal coach Chef Jung

     

    Kim Die-Woo Choi Jung-Hwa
    security staff Caregiver Ko Bo-Hui (ep.13)

    Hyowon Group

    Lee Yoon-Jae Kim Woo-Dam Ma Jung-Pill Lee Ho-Suk Kim Jung-Suk
    Attorney Choi Jin-Yeong Secretary Seo Secretary Cha Secretary Cho Chauffeur Kim

     

    Kim Jin-Tae Song Kyung-Etui Kim Soo-Hyun Park Sang-Yong Lee Suk-Goo
    Han Ji-Yong’s chauffeur Dr. Kim pr team employee (ep.6) attorney (ep.6) board of director (ep.8,11)

     

    Sung Chan-Ho
    board of director (ep.12-13)

    Hagwon Gallery

    Song Seon-mi
    Gallery Director Seo Jin-Kyung

    Soo-Hyun Gallery

    Ahn Ji-Hye Kim Sun-Kyung Jo Su-Bin Song Seung-Hwan
    deputy director mother at Seo-Hyun Gallery (ep.3) daughter at Seo-Hyun Gallery (ep.3) autistic teen artist (ep.8)

    IL sin

    Ye Soo-Jung Kim Yoon-Ji Oh Jung-Yeon Kim Ki-Bum
    Mother Emma Jasmin Mi-Joo Father Paul (ep.16)

    Jung Seo-Hyun’s Group

    Kim Jung-Hwa Jo Hye-Won Kim Yi-Seo
    Suzy Choi Jung Seo-Hyun (young) (ep.2) Suzy Choi (young) (ep.2)

    Chairman Han Suk-Chol’s Past

     

    Yoon Dong-Joo Choi Soo-Im
    Han Suk-Chula (young) Kim Mi-Ja

    Fight Club Group

    Jang Depok-Ju Gil Gem-Sung Kim Die-Han
    Cho Gyeonggi-Cheol Kwak Su-Chang Cho Beam-Gu

    Police

    Seo Sung-Jong Choi Young-Joon
    Detective Hwang Hyeong-Su Baek Dong-Hun

    Reporters

    Lee Chula Park Na-Jin Seo Sang-Won Ki Hwan
    Reporter Yoon Suk-Ho reporter (ep.3) reporter (ep.3) Reporter, I’m Seung-Su (ep.5)

    Han Jin-Ho’s Mistresses

    Jung Yun-Ha Oh A-Lin
    Chae-Young Hui-Bin (ep.6,15)

    Kim Yu-Yeon’s Family

    Choi Hyun-Jin
    Kim Yu-Yeon’s brother (ep.4,16)

    Jung Seo-Hyun’s Parenting Group

    Kwon So-Hyun Kim Ji-Woo Kwak Na-Yeon Jin Yu-Chan Yoo Ah-Rheum
    Ji-Won’s mother (ep.3-4) Ji-Won (ep.3-4) maid for Ji Won’s family (ep.3-4) Ji-Won’s friend (ep.3) student’s mother (ep.3)

     

    Lim Hyang-Ju
    student’s mother (ep.3)

    Others

    Jang Ha-Eon Lee Dong-Kyu Park Soo-Jin Lee Ji-Hyun Kim Yolo-Ho
    Rho A-Rim JSH news announcer (ep.3) doctor (ep.4,6) Maid Jang Hye-Yeong (ep.5,7) horse riding coach (ep.5)

     

    Lee Jae-Woo Lee Ga-Kyung Kim Hyo-Jin Kim Hee-Chang Seal Yoon-Hee
    jeweler (ep.6) Kang Ja-Kyung (ep.7) Chairman Yang Chi-Gon’s wife (ep.9) Attorney Kim Nam-Tae (ep.9) Jung Seo-Hyun’s acquaintance (ep.9)

     

    Yun Ki-Chang Kim Yong-Jin Jung Soo-Han Lim Jae-Myung Jung Young-Do
    Attorney Hwang Bo-In (ep.10-11) AA counselor (ep.10-11) AA member (ep.10-11) AA member (ep.10-11) veterinarian (ep.10)

     

    Lee Woo-Shin Oh Kyu-Taek Ri Min Jung Tae-In Han Yeo-Wool
    judge (ep.10-11) drama series staff (ep.12) Mr. Ha (ep.14) Seo Hi-Soo’s friend (ep.14) Seo Hi-Soo’s friend (ep.14)

     

    Choi Young-Min Kim Joo-A
    video forensics (ep.14) psychiatrist (ep.15)

    Additional Cast Members:

    Lee Yoon-Min – Chauffeur Park

    Kim Ha-Rin – designer (ep.1,8)

    Ko Kyung-Man – priest (ep.1)

    Park Hee-Yeon – (ep.3)

    Jo Soo-Yeon – cinema employee (ep.4)

    Kim Jung-Hwan – funeral priest (ep.13)

     

    Stranger (TV series)

     

    Stranger
    Comment:

    Well, done police drama.  The usual rich people behaving badly, political corruption, honest police officers trying to solve crime being thwarted by corrupt senior-level figures.  The romance theme was hinted at but never really developed.  There was also a nice sub-theme of a serial killer whose crimes were covered up by his father who was a prosecutor.  The series takes place amid the South Korean government’s attempt to reform the prosecutor’s office transferring much of their power to the police.  The movie is perhaps a bit too pro-government reform in that regard.  I would have liked to have seen a stronger romance and would have liked to have seen the political corporation corruption case spelled out a lot more. The plot was a bit confusing but the acting was first-rate.   I would have to give it a B.  End comment

     

     

    Promotional poster for the first season

    Also known as Secret Forest

    Forest of Secrets

    Hangul 비밀의 숲
    Hanja 祕密의 숲
    Genre Crime

    Drama

    Thriller

    Created by Studio Dragon
    Written by Lee Soo-Yeon
    Directed by Ahn Gil-ho (Season 1)

    Yoo Je-won (Season 1)

    Park Hyun-Suk (Season 2)

    Creative directors Kim Suk-won

    Kim Sung-kytoon

    Starring Cho Seung-woo

    Bae Dona

    Lee Joon-hyuk

    Yoo Jae-Myung

    Shin Hye-sun

    Jeon Hye-jin

    Choi Moo-sung

    Yoon Se-ah

    Theme music composer Kim Jun-Seok
    Opening theme Stranger
    Composers Kim Jun-Seok

    Jung Sae-rim

    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 2
    No. of episodes 32 (list of episodes)
    Production
    Executive producers Lee Chan-ho

    Min Hyun-il

    Go Byung-churl

    Lee Sung-jin

    Producers Park Unyoung

    Seo Jae-Hyun

    Cinematography Jang Jong-Kyung
    Editor Kim Na-young
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 63-86 minutes
    Production companies Signal Entertainment Group

    IOK Media

    Ace Factory (Season 2)

    Distributor tyvm (Asia)

    Netflix (Worldwide)

    Release
    Original network tyvm
    Picture format HDTV 1080i
    Audio format Dolby Digital 5.1
    Original release June 10, 2017 –
    present
    External links
    Website

    Stranger (Korean: 비밀의 숲; RR: Baillieu Sup; lit. Secret Forest) is a South Korean crime thriller drama television series. Produced by Signal Entertainment and IOK Media, it was created by Studio Dragon writer Lee Soo-Yeon and broadcast on tvN from June 10, 2017. The series was renewed for a second season, which premiered on August 15, 2020.

    The series was a hit with both domestic and international viewers,[1] and received favorable reviews for its tight plot, gripping sequences, and strong performances.[2][3] It was featured on the New York Times list of Best TV Shows of 2017,[4] and won several awards including the Grand Prize for television at the Baek sang.[5]

    Synopsis[edit]

    In the first season, Hwang Si-Mok (Cho Seung-woo) is an exemplary prosecutor who suffers from hypersensitivity to certain sound frequencies. After undergoing corrective surgery, he lost his sense of empathy and lacks social skills. While investigating a murder, he meets Police Lieutenant Han Yeo-jin (Bae Dona), who assists his efforts to solve the case. As they begin to unravel the mystery behind the murder, they find that their efforts are continually being obstructed by participants in a major corruption conspiracy between the Prosecutors’ Office and a private chaebol (conglomerate).

    In the second season, set two years later, a dispute arises between the Prosecutors’ Office and the National Police Agency, with the former wanting control over all investigative proceedings while the latter seeks autonomous authority to conduct investigations. Amid their respective agencies’ conflict, Hwang Si-Mok, and Han Yeo-jin team up to conduct their independent investigation of a concealed case.[6]

    Cast and characters[edit]

    Main article: List of Stranger characters

    Cho Seung-woo as Hwang Si-Mok

    Bae Dona as Han Yeo-jin

    Lee Joon-hyuk as Seo Dong-Jae

    Yoo Jae-Myung as Lee Chang-Joon (season 1; guest season 2)

    Shin Hye-sun as Young Eon-soo (season 1; guest season 2)

    Yoon Se-ah as Lee Yeon-Jae (season 2; recurring season 1)

    Jeon Hye-jin as Choi Bit (season 2)

    Choi Moo-sung as Woo Tae-ha (season 2)

    Episodes[edit]

    Main article: List of Stranger episodes

    Season Episodes Originally aired Ave. South Korea
    viewers (millions)
    First aired Last aired
    1 16 June 10, 2017 July 30, 2017 N/A[a]
    2 16 August 15, 2020 October 4, 2020 1.774

    Production[edit]

    Development[edit]

    The entire series was written by Lee Soo-Yeon who was inspired by the Korean adage “We cannot rule those who want nothing” to create the character of Si-Mok.[7] Ahn Gil-ho directed the majority of the first season with the assistance of Yoo Je-won, while Park Hyun-Seok took over the filming duties for the second season.[8] Unlike usual South Korean dramas, the series was developed as a potential multi-seasonal program, with most of the filming have already been pre-produced before its broadcast.[9][10]

    Casting[edit]

    In January 2017, Cho Seung-woo and Bae Dona were offered the lead roles. The same month Shin Hye-sun was added to the cast.[11] It was the first television drama Cho Seung-woo had accepted since God’s Gift – 14 Days in 2014, after venturing into musical theatre for seven years.[12] For the second season, cast members Cho Seung-woo, Bae Dona, Lee Joon-hyuk, and Yoon Se-ah, were all confirmed to reprise their roles. Jeon Hye-jin and Choi Moo-sung were also confirmed to join the lead cast in January 2020.[6]

    Filming[edit]

    Filming of the first season began in April 2017, preceded by the first script reading with the cast at the CJ E&M Center in Seoul.[12] Script reading for the second season took place in January 2020.[6]

    Music[edit]

    Stranger (Original Television Soundtrack)
    Soundtrack album by

    Various artists

    Released September 13, 2017
    Genre Soundtrack
    Length 157 minutes
    Language Korean

    English

    Label Mog

    Kakao M

    Universal Music Korea

    An accompanying soundtrack compilation to Stranger was released by Mog Communications and Kakao M on September 13, 2017, in South Korea.[13] It was later reissued by Universal Music Group in overseas markets on May 11, 2018.[14] A three-disc album, the latter two discs features music composed by Kim Jun-Seok and Jung Sae-rin for the program.[15][16] Ten songs were released from the soundtrack as singles in numbered parts from June to July 2017: “끝도없이 (Ad Infinitum)” by Richard Parkers, “먼지 (Dust)” Evelia, “소나기 (Downpour)” by Ohio, “괴물처럼 (Monster Like)” by Tie, “웃어요 (Smile)” by Han Hee Jung & Sorae, the titular track “비밀의 숲 (Stranger)” by Yoon Do-Hyun, “사랑할 것 처럼 (As if to Love)” by Kim Kohen of My teen, “물결 (A Billow)” by Yean of Lovely, “굿바이 잘가요 (Goodbye)”/”Back in Time” by Peter Han, and “묻는다 (Ask)” by Jung Won-boo of NeighBro & Jun Sang-gun.[17] Of these, the songs “소나기 (Downpour)” and “사랑할 것 처럼 (As if to Love)” have managed to enter the South Korean Gaon BGM Music Chart at numbers 80 and 79, respectively.[18][19]

    Stranger OST Track listing[15][16]

    show

    Season 1 soundtrack

    show

    Season 2 soundtrack

    Release[edit]

    The pilot episode of Stranger aired on June 10, 2017, on tyvm, replacing Chicago TypewriterNetflix secured the worldwide streaming rights for the series for US$200,000 per episode, except in Korea and China, and released them in simultaneous broadcast with TV as a Netflix original program. The Korea Times reported that Bae Dona, who had previously appeared in the Netflix original series Sense8, proved to be crucial in the purchase of the drama.[20] TV affiliate tvN Asia also aired the program in selected Asian markets beginning on June 16, 2018.[21] A second season was commissioned by TV, set to be released with Netflix on the same day.[22] It premiered on August 15, 2020, replacing It’s Okay to Not Be Okay.[10][23]

    Reception[edit]

    Critical response[edit]

    In an article by columnist Dena Dew for Screen Rant, Stranger was described as a “domestic and international success”.[24] Though ratings-wise, the program was not a “smash hit”, pundits and audiences praised it as a “league of its own”.[7] Korean culture critic Ha Jae-gun described the character as a “fantasy that was borne out of a time of distrust”.[7] In her review for The Korea Times, columnist Park Jin-hai commended the writing as “finely intertwined”, and wrote that audiences gave a strong response to this “drama for thinking people”.[7] The New York Times listed the series in tenth place as they’re The Best TV Shows of 2017.[25]

    At the 54th Buesking Arts Awards, the series received eight nominations, including two considerations for Grand Prize for Television, winning one for the whole series.[26] Cho Seung-woo and Lee Soo-Yeon also won Best Television Actor and Best Television Screenplay, respectively.[26] In a Gallup Korea poll, audiences aged 19 and above selected Stranger as their 12th favorite show in July 2017.[27] While Google Korea listed the series as the ninth most-searched television program of 2017.[28]

    Viewership[edit]

    According to data published by Nielsen Korea, the pilot episode of the series was seen by 3.041percent of total nationwide viewers, in metropolitan Seoul, it earned a 3.2percent rating, which made it the highest-rated program of the day among non-terrestrial channel programs.[29] The program achieved its highest rating on the first-season finale, earning a 6.568percent nationwide rating and a 7.622percent rating within Seoul-based viewers.[30] On average, it was seen by 4.562percent of total viewership.[31] On the Times rating system, the series premiered with a 3.2percent rating and ended its first season with a 7.1percent rating.[32] The last episode recorded noticeably strong rating performances as it took the lead rating for the first time against hit variety show Hori’s that aired in the same time slot and became the highest-rated program of the day among non-terrestrial channels programs.[33][34]

     

     

    Mr. Sunshine
    Comment one of the top K dramas in the last few years. It is set in the late 19th century. The end of the Korean Chosen dynasty was a period that led directly to modern Korea.  Many of the things that make modern Korea have to do with how the last dynasty ended with the Japanese colonization, and the ending of the Japanese era.

     

    In many ways, the last dynasty was doomed from the onset.  The leaders were corrupt, self-interested, and reactionary. They were unable to adapt to changing circumstances and Japan was on the ascendant as the new power in east Asia.

     

    Perhaps under different leadership. Korea might have retained its independence as Thailand did during that period. But unfortunately, Korea had inept leaders as well as chronic political corruption which the nefarious Japanese utilized aided by pro-Japanese Koreans who saw Japan as the future and sold out their country.

     

    That dynamic plays out through the drama. The story is an unlikely love story between a young Korean orphan who is sent to the US by a missionary and eventually joins the US Marines as an officer and is sent to Korea to work in the legation there and serves in Korea until the Japanese annexation, and a young Korean noblewoman who joins the “righteous army” of guerilla fighters who are fighting the Japanese takeover and of course lose the battle after the Japanese-Russian war of 1905.

     

    There are many historical allusions throughout the series.  Some of it is accurate, some are overblown and some well are just wrong.

     

    As far as I know, there were no Korean American troops in Korea during this period. Also, it is highly unlikely that a noblewoman would have been involved with the Righteous army.

     

    There is also an implied theme throughout that the US sold Korean out to the evil Japanese.  The reality is more than the U.S.  looked the other way, not wanting to lose the Philippines.   Korea was just not that important to the U.S.  So, in that sense perhaps one could say that the U.S sold out Korea but then again it is hard to imagine that the U.S. would have done anything else given how marginal Korea was to U.S. strategic interests back then.

     

    The writing was first-rate, the dialogue sizzling.  The sub-themes are well done.  Overall, I would give it a B+.

     

     

     

    Promotional poster
    Hangul 미스터 션샤인
    Genre Historical

    Romance

    Melodrama

    Created by Jennie Choi
    Written by Kim Eon-sook
    Directed by Lee Aung-bok [ko]
    Starring Lee Byung-Hun

    Kim Tae-Ri

    Yoo Yeon-Seok

    Kim Min-Jung

    Byun Yo-hand

    Composer Nam Hye-Seung
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original languages Korean, Japanese, English
    No. of seasons 1
    No. of episodes 24[1] (list of episodes)
    Production
    Executive producers Kim Young-kyu
    Yoon Ha-rim
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Production companies Studio Dragon

    Haddam Pictures

    Distributor CJ E&M

    Netflix

    Budget 40 billion[2]
    Release
    Original network TV
    Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release July 7 –
    September 30, 2018[3]
    External links
    Website
    Production website

    Mr. Sunshine (Korean: 미스터 션샤인; RR: Misquote Syeonsyain) is a 2018 South Korean television series written by Kim Eon-sook and directed by Lee Eung-bok [ko], starring Lee Byung-HunKim Tae-RiYoo Yeon-SeokKim Min-jung, and Byun Yo-hand.[4][5] The series is set in Hansen (present-day Seoul) in the early 1900s and focuses on activists fighting for Korea’s independence.[6][7] The series aired every Saturday and Sunday on tyvm starting from July 7, 2018, and ended on September 30, 2018. It premiered internationally on Netflix.[8]

    The series recorded the 6th highest ratings for cable television with its final episode reaching 18.129percent and netting an average rating of 12.955percent, which is the second-highest average rating ever recorded for cable television.[9] It received critical acclaim for its cinematography and storytelling but was also criticized for its inaccurate portrayal of historical facts, with some even accusing it of being “pro-Japanese“.[10]

    Synopsis[edit]

    Mr. Sunshine centers around Eugene Choi (Lee Byung-Hun), who was born into slavery in Joseon. After escaping to the United States after the 1871 Shimmying, he becomes a Marine Corps officer.

    When he returns to Joseon for a mission, Eugene meets and falls in love with an aristocrat’s granddaughter, Go Ae-shin (Kim Tae-ri), who is part of the Righteous Army. However, their love is challenged by their different classes and the presence of Kim Hui-song (Byun Yo-han), a nobleman who has been Ae-shin’s betrothed since childhood. Eugene also encounters Goo Dong-Mae (Yoo Yeon-Seok), a ruthless samurai, and Kudo Hana (Kim Min-jung), owner of the popular “Glory Hotel” where Eugene stays. At the same time, he discovers a plot by the Empire of Japan to colonize Korea and soon becomes embroiled in the fight for Joseon’s sovereignty.

    Historical background[edit]

    Unlike most Suns dramas dealing with the Japanese occupation of Korea, Mr. Sunshine takes place before the Japanese annexation, in the late 1800s to early 1900s. It has a heavy focus on the Righteous Army and depicts the lives of people who fought for Joseon’s freedom. Real-life historical events such as Shimmying, the Spanish-American War,[11] the assassination of Empress Kyongsang, the Russo-Japanese War,[12] Goon’s forced abdication, and the Battle of Mandamus are portrayed or mentioned.[13]

    Historical figures such as Emperor Gojong, Ito HiromiHayashi GonsukeYoshimichi HasegawaHorace Newton Allen, and the Five Elsa Traitors[12] appear as recurring characters, with others, such as Theodore Roosevelt,[14] Ahn Chang-ho,[15] Eum Sun-heon [ko],[16] Park Seung-hwan [ko],[13] and Frederick Arthur Mackenzie, also making cameo appearances.

    Main Historical Events Described in Mr. Sunshine[edit]

    The Battle of Ganghwa (1871): It was a major battle that occurred on June 10, 1871, between the United States and the Joseon Dynasty. On June 1, the American ships entered the Ganghwa Straits to establish trade and ensure the safety of the shipwrecked sailors of the SS Sherman, which was destroyed by the army of Joseon. However, they came under fire. The United States gave Joseon ten days to apologize, but they refused. As a result, on June 10, the U.S ships USS Palos and USS Monocacy fired their weapons against the Choi Garrison on Ganghwa Island and wiped out the Joseon army.[17] In Mr. Sunshine, the battle scenes are thoroughly described as its character Jang Seung-goo fought in this battle as a teen and lost his father. This battle was a pivotal moment for Seung-goo as it caused him to believe that King Gojong abandoned his people and let them die.

    The Japan-Korean Treaty of 1905: This treaty was made between the Empire of Japan and the Korean Empire on November 17, 1905. Through it, Japan effectively overtook the diplomatic control of Korea.[18] While Mr. Sunshine does not demonstrate this treaty and its effects in detail, it contains a scene in which Kim Hui-song takes pictures of the pro-Japanese Korean officials. Through these pictures, Hui-song intends to let his descendants know the misconduct of the corrupted government officials.

    The Battle of Mandamus: This battle was fought between the Korean and Japanese armies on August 1, 1907. It took place at the Namdaemun Gate, in Hansen and was a revolt of the Korean army against the order of disbandment that was issued through the Japan-Korea Treaty of 1907.[19] In Mr. Sunshine, the battle scenes are depicted in detail. The character Jang Seung-goo sacrifices himself to protect his soldiers. This battle is a turning point for Seung-goo as he sacrifices himself for a country and an emperor he dislikes.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Lee Byung-Hun as Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[20][21]

    Kim Kang-hoon as child Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[22]

    Jeon Jin-hee [ko] as young Eugene Choi / Choi Yoo-jin[23]

    Eugene Choi was born as a slave of Kim Pan-see, the paternal grandfather of Kim Hui-song. After witnessing his parents’ murder at the hands of their landlord, Eugene managed to escape to the United States and overcome the racial discrimination and become an American, he joins the Marine Corps and fights in the Spanish-American War. Later, Eugene returns to Joseon to carry a mission and falls in love with Go Ae-shin, a noblewoman who is secretly part of the Righteous army. Eugene has to choose between helping Ae-shin in her fight and maintaining his neutral position as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps.

    Kim Tae-ri as Go Ae-shin[24]

    Heo Jung-eon as child Go Ae-shin[25]

    A Joseon noblewoman who lost her parents as an infant. Ae-shin’s mother and father were independence fighters and were both killed in Japan due to their colleague’s betrayal. She is raised by her paternal grandfather, Go Sa-Hong, who helps Ae-shin train as a sniper under Jang Seung-goo and becomes part of the Righteous army. She meets Eugene Choi, who looks like people from Joseon yet claims to be an American, and falls in love with him.

    Yoo Yeon-Seok as Goo Dong-mae / Ishida Shoo[26]

    Choi Min-young [ko] as young Goo Dong-Mae

    The son of a butcher flees to Japan upon his parents’ death and becomes a samurai and member of the Music Society, which is part of a Yakuza group. Dong-Mae returns to Joseon with a mission of tormenting the people and helping the Japanese army overtake the country. He believes that it is Joseon’s unjust social hierarchical system that killed his parents. As a teen, Dong-Mae met Go Ae-shin, who saved his life, by purposely hiding him in her palanquin.

    Kim Min-Jung as Lee Yang-hwa / Kudo Hana[27]

    An influential widow who runs a hotel in Joseon. She was married off to an old, rich Japanese man by her father, Lee Wan-ink. Upon her husband’s mysterious death, she inherited the “Glory Hotel” and successfully operates it on her own. China is deeply ashamed of her father’s misdeeds and reputation and to find her mother, she helps Lee Jung-moon in fighting against the Japanese government and the pro-Japanese officials.

    Bien Yo-han as Kim Hui-seong[28]

    A Joseon nobleman is considered to be the richest after the emperor in terms of land ownership. Hui-song is emotionally tormented by his grandfather’s past and lives for over a decade in Japan to avoid marrying the woman his grandfather chose for him. However, once he returns to Joseon, he discovers that his fiancé is Go Ae-shin and falls in love with her, only to realize that there is no place left for him in her heart. Unlike his father and grandfather, Hui-song helps the Righteous army in many ways as he desperately desires to free himself from the sense of guiltiness.

     

    Recurring

     

    Joseon Government/

     

    as Emperor Gojong[29]

     

    Kang Yi-Seok as young Emperor Gojong

    The ruler of Joseon, who desperately fights for the country’s sovereignty.

     

    Kang Shin-il as Lee Jung-moon

    An anti-Japanese Minister who is loyal to the emperor. He secretly commands the Righteous Army.

     

    Kim Etui-sung as Lee Wan-ik[30]

    A selfish and cruel pro-Japanese official who killed Go Ae-shin’s parents. The father of Kudo China, he soon becomes Joseon’s Minister of Foreign Affairs. He walks with a limp after a young Jang Seung-goo shot his leg during the Shimmying.  Kim Jong-hee [ko] as Lee Deok-moon

    A pro-Japanese nobleman who works as an assistant for Lee Wan-ink. He is Go Ae-son’s abusive husband.

     

    Choi Jin-ho as Lee Se-hoon[31]

    The arrogant and corrupt Minister of Foreign Affairs whose actions indirectly led to the deaths of Eugene Choi’s family.

     

    Jung Hee-tea [ko] as Police Commissioner Jung Shin Mun-sung as Postmaster Yoon

    Kim Kang-il [ko] as Dr. Matsuyama

    A Japanese doctor secretly working for Lee Wan-ink.

     

    Jung Seung-Gil [ko] as Ye Wan-yong

    An infamous pro-Japanese Minister and part of the Five Elsa Traitors.

     

    Righteous Army[Kim Kapp-soo as Hwang Eun-san[32]

     

    A skilled potter who helped a young Choi Yoo-jin flee to the United States. He is now the leader of the Righteous army.  Lee Si-hoon as Ko Yoshino[33]

    A Japanese man works as an assistant for Hwang Eon-san.

     

    Itaewon Class

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    Itaewon Class jump
    Promotional poster
    Hangul 이태원 클라쓰
    Hanja 梨泰院 클라쓰
    Genre Drama
    Based on Itaewon Class
    by Gang Jin
    Developed by Kim Do-soo for Showbox
    Written by Gang Jin
    Directed by Kim Sung-Yoon
    Starring Park Seo-Joon

    Kim Da-mi

    Yoo Jae-Myung

    Kwon Nara

    Composer Various artists
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 16
    Production
    Executive producer Jo Joon-Hyung
    Producers Lee Sang-Yoon

    Jung Soo-jin

    Han Suk-won

    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 70 minutes
    Production companies Showbox

    Sium Content[a]

    Itaewon Class Production Partners

    Drama House (JTBC Studios)

    Distributor JTBC

    Netflix (international)

    Release
    Original network JTBC
    Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release January 31 –
    March 21, 2020
    External links
    Website

    Itaewon Class (Korean: 이태원 클라쓰; Hanja: 梨泰院 클라쓰; RR: Itaewon Keelless) is a 2020 South Korean television series starring Park Seo-JoonKim Da-miYoo Jae-Myung, and Kwon Nara. Based on the webtoon of the same name,[2] it is the first series to be produced by the film distribution company Showbox. It aired on JTBC in Korea from January 31 to March 21, 2020, and is streaming worldwide on Netflix.[3][4][5] The series won Best Drama Series at the 25th Asian Television Awards.[6][7]

    In the case of the webtoon, when Kakao Page and Daum webtoon were added together, the cumulative number of readers was 10 million, the cumulative number of views was 300 million, and the rating was 9.9 points.

    Synopsis[edit]

    Due to an accident that killed his father, Park Sae-ro-Yi (Park Seo-Joon) attempted to kill Jang Geun-won (Ahn Bo-Hyun), the son of Janggi Group’s founder, Jang Die-hee (Yoo Jae-Myung). He was jailed and the woman he loved, Oh Soo-ah (Kwon Na-ra), was offered a university scholarship by Jang Die-hee and later became the Strategic Planning Head of Janggi Group.

    After his release from prison, Park Sae-ro-Yi opens Danbam in Itaewon. He wants to be successful and seeks revenge on the Janggi Group. However, he is not too smart at managing his business. He then meets Jo Yi-see (Kim Da-mi).

    Cast and characters[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Park Seo-Joon as Park Sae-ro-yi[8]

    Proprietor of Dana, a bar-restaurant in Itaewon. In his youth, Sae-ro-Yi gets expelled from high school for punching CEO Jang’s son Geun-won, who was bullying a classmate, and becomes bereaved when his father is killed by Geun-won’s reckless driving. Angered by the loss, he attacks Geun-won, leading to his three-year imprisonment. Following his father’s steps, Sae-ro-Yi opens his bar-restaurant Dana in Itaewon seven years after he is released from jail, with the aim of expanding it into a franchise and defeating CEO Jang’s food company Janggi Group. In 2020, he becomes the CEO of his company IC Group.

    Kim Da-mi as Jo Yi-seo[9]

    Manager of Sae-Ro-Yi’s bar-restaurant Dana. Yi-see is a multi-talented and intelligent girl with an IQ of 162. She moved from New York to continue her studies in South Korea. She is also famous on social media as a power blogger and social media internet celebrity. Having a crush on Sae-Ro-Yi, she offers to become the manager of Dana. Her lack of empathy and callous behavior has many people believe she is a sociopath, but she does end up caring for her Dana coworkers. Despite being declined by Sae-ro-Yi, Yi-seo remains by his side as his manager and work partner while still maintaining feelings for him. In 2020, Yi-see becomes the CFO of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group. Eventually, Saroyan realizes his feelings for Yi-Seo and he confesses his love for her.

    Yoo Jae-Myung as Jang Dae-hee[10]

    CEO of food company Janggi Group. CEO Jang is a self-made man who, despite the odds, succeeds in turning his once small bar into a large franchise company. In his years of experience leading Janggi, he develops a strong belief in power and authority as a means to achieve his goals. He meets Sae-ro-Yi when the latter has a fight with his son Geun-won in high school and expects him to kneel as a submission of his power. However, Sasori always resisted kneeling and made his life harder for it. In 2020, he is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and doesn’t have much longer to live. Unfortunately, his illegal activities under Janggi were exposed and ruined his company. Despite kneeling before Sae-Ro-Yi for help, Sae-Ro-Yi absorbed Janggi into his company, leaving Die-Hee with nothing.

    Kwon Nara as Oh Soo-ah[11]

    Head of the strategic planning team in Janggi Group; Sae-ro-Yi’s former classmate and first love. Abandoned by her mother, Soo-ah grew up in an orphanage and became close with Sae-ro-Yi’s father Sung-yeol. She becomes acquainted with Sae-ro-Yi, who has a crush on her. After Sung-yell’s death, she receives a scholarship offer from Janggi Group and soon becomes an employee in the company. Though passionate about her work, she is torn between her allegiance to Janggi and her love for Sae-ro-Yi. Due to their conflicts of interests, the two would hold a long-term emotional relationship, but never a truly romantic one. Eventually, Soo-ah realizes Saroyan’s feelings have changed and the two remain friends. She later became a whistleblower to the authorities on the crimes that Janggi has committed in the past during her time in the company and later starts her restaurant.

    Supporting[edit]

    Dana staff[edit]

    Kim Dong-hee as Jang Geun-soo[12]

    CEO Jang’s second and illegitimate son; Yi-see’s classmate and staff member at Dana. Geun-soo has been bullied by his older brother Geun-won and he never felt loved by his parents. Upon turning 17, he left the Jang family and lived by himself from then on. After inconveniencing Dana in an incident, he decides to work for Sae-ro-Yi, whom he considers to be a “real adult.” He has a crush on Yi-see. However, after leaving Dana, Geun-soo chooses to work at his father’s company to become the successor to the Janggi Group. In 2020, he is the director of Janggi Group.

    Ryu Kyung-soo as Choi Seung-kwon[13]

    A staff member at Dana. Seung-Kwon was Sae-ro-Yi’s cellmate in prison. Believing that he cannot better his life outside of jail, he became a gangster under a gang leader upon his release. Seven years later, he meets Sae-ro-Yi who, to his surprise, had already opened a bar in Itaewon. Deeply respecting Sae-ro-Yi and his way to live a better life, he gives up being a gangster and starts working at Dana. In 2020, he becomes one of the directors of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group.

    Lee Joo-young as Ma Hyeon-Yi[14]

    Dunam’s chief cook. Hyun-Yi first met Sae-ro-yi in a factory where the two formerly worked, years before the start of Dana. She was hired as Dunam’s cook when Sae-ro-yi liked the food she once cooked for him back then. Hyun-Yi is a transgender woman and has been saving money for her sex reassignment surgery. In 2020, she becomes one of the directors of Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group.

    Chris Lyon as Kim To-ni[15]

    Dammam’s GuineanKorean part-timer. Even though he cannot speak and understand English, To-ni is fluent in speaking Korean, owing to his Korean father and his one-year residence in South Korea, and French, the language he speaks in Guinea. Eventually, he can learn and speak a satisfactory amount of English.

    Janggi Group[edit]

    Ahn Bo-Hyun as Jang Geun-won[16]

    CEO Jang’s first son and heir to Janggi Group. Geun-won was Sae-ro-Yi and Soo-ah’s classmate in high school who frequently bullied their classmate Ho-jin. He caused the vehicular accident that killed Sae-ro-Yi’s father Sung-yeol. Years later when he attempts to recruit Yi-see into Jangga, his confession to the crime is recorded by her and he attacks her until Sae-ro-Yi intervenes and gets him arrested. Die-hee deserts Geun-won by admitting his son’s crimes during his apology meeting and getting him sent to prison. In 2020, he is released and alongside Kim Hee-hon and his gang, Geun-won plans to get revenge on Yi-see.

    Kim Hye-eon as Kang Min-jung[17]

    Janggi Group’s executive director, who secretly plots to usurp CEO Jang. She is a close friend of Park Sung-yell, Park Sae-ro-Yi’s father.

    Hong Seo-Joon as Mr. Kim[18]

    Jang Daeheon’s right-hand man. He is very loyal to his boss.

    Yoo Da-mi as Kim Sun-ae[19]

    Jang Daeheon’s secretary and Kang Min-Jung’s spy.

    Others[edit]

    Lee David as Lee Ho-jin[20]

    Sae-Moji’s investment manager. Ho-jin was Sae-ro-Yi, Soo-ah, and Geun-won’s classmate in high school. After years of bearing the constant bullying from Geun-won, he gets into a prestigious college and takes up business administration. He partners up with Sae-ro-Yi in taking revenge against Geun-won and CEO Jang. In 2020, he becomes the financial manager for Sae-ro-Yi’s company IC Group. In one of the flashback scenes when he visited Sae-ro-Yi in prison; he listed Sae-ro-Yi as a friend.

    Kim Yeo-jin as Jo Jeong-min[21]

    Yi-see’s mother, who disapproves of Yi-see quitting college and working at Dammam.

    Yoon Kyung-ho as Oh Byeong-heon[22]

    Detective in charge of Geun-won’s hit-and-run case which he was pressured to cover up. He quit his job after the case and is now one of Sae-ro-Yi’s suppliers.

    Choi Yu-ri as Oh Hye-won[23]

    Oh, Byeong-heron’s daughter, who is oblivious to Sae-ro-Yi’s connection with her father.

    Kim Mi-keying as Kim Soon-rye[24]

    To-nose Korean paternal grandmother. After her son’s death, she deeply regrets disapproving of her son’s marriage to a Guinean woman (To-nose mother), as it caused her son to run away. She is a loan shark who offers her services to Sae-ro-Yi when he moves his bar to a new location. She was also one of the first supporters of Janggi.

    Won Hyun-Joon as Kim Hee-hoon[25]

    Sae-ro-Yi’s former cellmate and a leader of a group of gangsters. Though initially cordial to both Sae-ro-Yi and Choi Seung-Kwon, he later allies himself with Jang Geun-won.

    Han Hye-ji as Kook Bok-hee[26]

    Yi-see and Geun-soo’s former classmate. Her bullying activities were exposed after Yi-see recorded her performing the act. After running into Yi-see months later, she attempted to assault her for ruining her reputation alongside her friends, only to be beaten down by Yi-see.

    Special appearances[edit]

    Ahn Sol-bin as Sae-ro-Yi’s classmate (Ep. 1)[27]

    A student who had a crush on Sae-ro-Yi and had her confession rejected by him.

    Son Hyun-jook as Park Sung-yeol (Ep. 1–2 & 15)[28]

    Sae-ro-Yi’s father and former employee in Janggi Group. He taught Sae-ro-Yi to stick to his beliefs and to fight for what is right. He resigned from Janggi in defense of Sae-ro-Yi’s deed of stopping Geun-won’s bullying. He died in an accident caused by Geun-won.

    Hong Seok-Cheon as himself (Ep. 2, 4, 9 & 16)[29]

    Soo-ah’s acquaintance. He works at a bar that Sae-ro-Yi visits twice (years before and after opening Dana). They meet again after Sae-ro-Yi moves the location of his bar.

    Yoon Park as Kim Sung-Hyun (Ep. 3)[30]

    Geun-so’s elder friend goes to Dana with Geun-soo and Yi-see where the two get caught for underage drinking.

    Cha Chung-hwa as Bureau Chief’s wife (Ep. 3)[31]

    Mother of Bok-hee, whose behavior was exposed online by Yi-see.

    I’m Seun as Bok-hee’s friend (Ep. 5)[32]

    One of Bok-he’s friends. She, alongside Bok-hee and her friend, attempted to assault Yi-see after running into each other months after high school graduation.

    Jung Yoo-min as Seo Jeong-In (Ep. 6)[33]

    The daughter of the CEO of a pharmaceutical company and Geun-won’s blind date. The blind date was arranged by Geun-won’s father.

    Seo Eon-soo as part-time job applicant (Ep. 6)[34]

    Sae-ro-Yi’s acquaintance. She applied for the job that was eventually offered to Kim To-ni. Yi-see rejected her application out of jealousy of her and Sae-ro-Yi’s close relationship.

    Kim Il-Jong as himself (Ep. 11 & 13)[35]

    Host of the cooking program shows The Best Pub.

    Jeon No-min as Do Jong-un (Ep. 11–12)[36]

    CEO of the investment firm Jung Myung Holdings. He offers Sae-ro-Yi to franchiseDanBam. Later he was one of the sleeper agents for Die Hee to thwart Sae-ro-Yi plan to franchise Dana.

    Lee Jun-Hyeon as Park Joon-gi (Ep. 11–13)[37]

    A contestant on The Best Pub. He represents Janggi Group as the head cook and comes in second to Hyun-Yi during the final. He subsequently gets fired.

    Park Bo-gum as Handsome Chef (Ep. 16)[38]

    The new chef at Soo-ah’s restaurant in which Hong Seok-Cheon invested after he passed the job interview.

    Kim Taehyung as Himself (Ep. 16)

    BTS member V visited his friend Seo-Joon to perform a rendition of the show’s OST.

     

    Comment:

     

    Very enjoyable drama set in one of the most colorful neighborhoods in Korea, Itaewon’s- Seoul’s international quarter.

     

    The basic plot is that of revenge.  The usual themes of rich people behaving badly, and corporate corruption. A young man in junior high comes to the aid of his classmate who is being bullied by the son of a rich family.  His father worked for the corporation.  The young man is told to apologize for calling out the actions of the bullies and refuses to do so.  His father is fired and attempts to open his restaurant with the aid of his son who has to drop out of school after the controversy.  The father is killed by his enemy drunk driving.  The young man attempts to kill his enemy and is sentenced to three years in prison.  He decides to get revenge.  It takes him ten years but in the end, he destroys the corporation.

     

    There are several romantic sub-plots in the movie. The protagonist has to decide between two women.  He eventually chooses the woman who comes to work for him in the restaurant he opens in Itaewon.  There is also an LGBT sub-theme as one of his staff members is trans transiting to a woman.  There is also an intriguing sub-plot involving a half African young man who comes to Korea to find his Korean family.

     

    Overall, very well done.

     

     

     

     

     

    Others Worth Watching

     

    Memories of the Alhambra

     

    program.tving.com/tvn/tvnalhambra

    Memories of the Alhambra is a 2018 South Korean television series, starring Hyun Bin and Park Shin-Hye. Primarily set in Spain, the series centers on a company CEO and a hostel owner who gets entangled in a series of mysterious incidents surrounding a new and intricate augmented reality game inspired by the stories of the Alhambra Palace. It aired on cable network tvN from December 1, 2018, to January 20, 2019, every Saturday and Sunday at 21:00. It is also available for online streaming on Netflix. Wikipedia

    Genre: Science fantasy, Action, Thriller, Romance

    Created by: Jennie Choi (Studio Dragon), Lee Myung-Han

    Written by: Song Jae-Jung

     

    Comment: Did not finish it but will return to it soon.  Had an intriguing SF plotline.

     

    End Comment

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The Negotiation (film)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (Redirected from Negotiation (film))

     

    The Negotiation
    Theatrical poster
    Hangul 협상
    Hanja 協商
    Revised Romanization Hyeobsang
    Directed by Lee Jong-Seok
    Screenplay by Choi Sung-Hyun
    Produced by Yoon Je-kyoon
    Lee Sang-jik
    Starring Son Ye-jin
    Hyun Bin
    Cinematography Lee Tae-Joon
    Edited by Jung Jin-hee
    Music by Hwang Sang-Joon
    Production
    companies
    JK Film
    CJ E&M[1]
    Distributed by CJ Entertainment
    Release date September 19, 2018 (South Korea)
    Running time 114 minutes
    Country South Korea
    Language Korean
    Budget 10 billion[2]
    Box office US$15.6 million[3]

    The Negotiation (Korean: 협상; Hanja: 協商; RR: Hyeobsang) is a 2018 South Korean action crime thriller film directed by Lee Jong-Seok and starring Son Ye-jin and Hyun Bin.[4][1] The film was released on September 19, 2018.[5][6][7]

    Two Filipino men kidnap a couple and hold them hostage at a house in Yingjie, Seoul. Crisis negotiator Inspector Ha Chae-youn of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency, who was on a date and was called by her colleague, Superintendent Ahn Hyuk-su, is brought in to handle the situation, despite strong protests from her superior, Captain Jung Jun-gu. While Chae-youn is negotiating with the kidnappers, Captain Jung decides to send a police officer hit team to kill the men, shooting one kidnapper on the shoulder. He immediately kills the man he was holding and was shot dead afterward. The remaining kidnapper used the woman as a shield and dragged her to a room. The police team arrives and kills the kidnapper in the room. Chae-youn enters the room to find the woman who had been killed by the kidnapper before the police team entering the house. The woman dies in Chae-youn’s arms, leaving Chae-youn shocked.

    Ten days later, a devastated Chae-youn decides to resign from the police force, but Captain Jung urges her to reconsider, before leaving on a work trip. Chae-youn is then urgently called upon by Ahn, who informs her that she has been urgently summoned to deal with a hostage crisis by the Commissioner himself. Upon arrival to a secret location, she meets with the Commissioner of Police Moon Jong-hyuk and Presidential Secretary Gong of National Security. She is ordered to negotiate with the kidnapper – Min Tae-gu, a Korea-based international arms dealer and UK citizen, who had kidnapped several Korean nationals from Bangkok – including a reporter named Lee Su-mok. Without any additional information, she hung up on Min twice after being offended by him and asks Secretary Gong to reveal to her the necessary details. Not wanting to talk, the two men ordered Chief Han to talk to Min instead, while she is being hesitant about doing so. Upon seeing the negotiations going sour, she takes the seat from Chief Han. While negotiating with Min video conferencing, she is shocked to discover that Captain Jung, who was supposed to be on a trip, has also been kidnapped by Min as well,

    Chae-youn is later informed that the hostages are being held at an island in the Malacca Straits, where a joint military-police op has been sent to, intent on freeing them. Han also informs them that Daehan Daily, a news outlet Lee is working for, had been ordered to keep silent of their employee’s situation, as requested by the President. Min later demands to see the CEO of Daehan Daily, Yoon Dong-hoon, Lee’s boss. While talking with Dong-hoon, Min demands to know whether Lee is one of his reporters or not. Min threatens Yoon that his own family could be in danger, revealing that he knows of their whereabouts. Commissioner Moon cuts into their conversation to stop Yoon from telling the truth. Because of this, Min shoots Captain Jung dead, which further shocked Chae-youn. Commissioner Moon and Secretary Gong bring in negotiators from the National Intelligence Services to take over and order Chae-youn, Ahn, and even Han to leave the site.

    Outside, Han reveals to them that Lee is a black agent working for the NIS, whose mission was to spy on Min’s syndicate. She tells them that Min is an arms dealer working in the Malacca Straits, selling every kind of weapons and equipment to other criminals in the majority of the Southeast Asian countries. Chae-youn’s two colleagues arrive in their van, and Chae-youn sought to find out the truth themselves. She then asks Ahn to follow Yoon and ask him further. Back inside, the NIS team approached Min aggressively, demanding that Min release his hostages or otherwise they will bombard his location, killing Agent Lee with him. Unbothered, Min reveals that he had also kidnapped a family of four, keeping the NIS under this thumb. Min demands to bring Chae-youn back as he will only talk to her. With no other choice, Chief Han goes over to bring Chae-youn, along with her team, back inside.

    This time, Chae-youn demands the NIS to tell her everything that they know about Min. Min demands Chae-youn to bring Koo Gwan-su—chairman of Nine Electronics, an arms company. As they wait, the NIS tells Chae-youn that Min used to work for Koo as the man in charge of dealing with the company’s illegal activities. When Min decided to work alone as an arms dealer in Malacca Straits, Koo betrays Min and tipped him off to the NIS. Koo also revealed the $50 million worth of taxes that he had evaded, and due to his ‘honesty, the government practically erased his criminal activities. When Chae-youn asks where Koo is, the NIS agent reveals to her that they were all inside the Nine Electrics weapons laboratory. Koo himself had funded the entire operation of the NIS to hunt Min down. In a hotel suite lounge somewhere downtown were Koo, NIS Deputy Chief Park In-kyu, Air Force Commander Son Jung-Tae, and the Chief of National Security himself, Hwang Ju-ik. These four men had been keeping a close eye on the entire operation.

    Meanwhile, Ahn found out from the escaping Yoon that NIS Deputy Chief Park was the one who asked him to give Agent Lee a false Daehan Daily ID. Koo arrives at the site and begins to talk with Min. Min asks Koo to restore a certain Swiss bank account, and Koo agrees to it. However, Min had further demanded. He asks Koo why he had killed a woman named Yoo Hyun-Ju. Koo denies any knowledge of any Hyun-Ju, and Min began to tell Chae-youn of Hyun-Ju. Min introduced Hyun-Ju to Koo as his secretary. In reality, Hyun-Ju was to keep records of hidden, expensive paintings that Koo owned and kept. These paintings were worth 10 billion won each, and profits from these paintings would be shared between Koo, Park, Son, and Hwang. Some of the paintings were kept in a house that Hyun-Ju and presumably her husband stayed in. It is revealed that Hyun-Ju was the woman who died in Chae-youn’s arms ten days ago, and Min convinces Chae-youn that something was amiss during that operation, which resulted in Hyun-Ju’s death, and the disappearance of the paintings in the house almost immediately. To further prove his point, Min plays an audio recording of a conversation between the four corrupt men. This recording was done by Hwang himself, where Min explained that Hwang never fully trusted the three other men he was working with and had a habit of keeping recording devices for important conversations. Min then demands Hwang to show up and talk to him in one hour, otherwise, he’ll kill every hostage—including the children.

    Chae-young and her team validate the information Min had given as they try to figure out the connection between Min and Hyun-Ju. Secretary Gong lies to Chae-young, telling her that Hwang was with the President and that he couldn’t come. Meanwhile, Ahn was able to track down Chief Park’s phone records. There, he found out that Captain Jung had accepted a bribe from Chief Park. Captain Jung was under the command of Chief Park, and that they planned to kill Hyun-Ju by using the Filipino kidnappers as an alibi. Chae-youn resumes the negotiations with Min, telling Min that Hyun-Ju’s case will be reopened. Min demands to talk with Commissioner Moon. Min asks if Koo is being questioned by the police and that if Hwang is really with the President. Before answering, they found out from a Thai server that Min had been live-streaming the entire situation on YouTube, which sends the country into a frenzy. Upon figuring out that Koo is not being questioned, and that Hwang is in hiding, Min shoots Agent Lee in the leg. He gives Hwang one last chance to show himself.

    Back in their lounge, Hwang orders Chief Park to invent a story and Commander Son to begin the military operation immediately. Hwang wants Min dead, along with the hostages. Meanwhile, Ahn returns to Hyun-Ju’s home, where the kidnapping ten days ago occurred. There, he found a photo of Somang Orphanage, an old orphanage where Hyun-Ju came from. He goes over to the new orphanage, and he found out that Hyun-Ju’s real name wasn’t Yoon Hyun-Ju, but Min Hyun-Ju—she was Min’s younger sister. Back in the lab, the military team arrived in Min’s location and authorizes the mission, despite Chae-youn’s protests. Min reveals that a bomb is strapped on one of the hostages, revealing a suicide for all of them. Either way, the team blows up a signal tower—stopping their communication. Chae-youn tries to stop the team from entering Min’s hideout as a bomb is present. Hwang (through Commander Son) pressures them to continue, and the team enters the hideout. However, as soon as they moved in, the room had exploded, presumably from Min’s suicide bomb, and killing the hostages inside. Hwang and his cronies were finally able to relax, and the NIS were packing up their things.

    As Chae-youn stares at the last footage of their negotiations with Min in despair, she notices through the background that Min wasn’t in Southeast Asia, but in South Korea all along. That night, Ahn went to the old orphanage building and found all of the hostages safe. Meanwhile, Min and his gang arrived at the Nine Electronics weapons lab. He orders his fellow gang to go home and takes the bomb with him. Min storms the lounge and finally catches Hwang, Koo, Park, and Son, with the bomb strapped to his chest. Chae-young, convinced Secretary Gong to reveal the true location of Hwang and his cronies so that they can stop Min. Min shoots Koo, activates the bomb via a detonator, and Chae-youn arrives at the lounge to finally meet Min. She apologizes to Min for not being able to protect Hyun-Ju, and she vows to defend Min at any cost to bring the remaining cronies to justice. Min reveals to her that he asked Hyun-Ju to betray Koo by stealing every bit of information he had. He believed that his plan ultimately led to his sister’s death. He raises the gun at Hwang, and he was shot to the head by a sniper outside. A flashback reveals that Min backfired with his plan, telling his sister that the plan is too dangerous after all. However, Hyun-Ju wanted to proceed with the plan, so that the two of them can find a place to live in silence and peace.

    As the team arrives to escort Hwang, Park, Son, and Chae-youn outside, Chae-youn overheard that the detonator wasn’t turned on, and Min planned to die in the end and bring the corrupt men to justice. Chae-young chases Hwang outside, prematurely telling them of their arrest as she shouts their rights to them. As their car leaves, the reporters then surround Chae-youn. Chae-youn and Ahn went to an overlooking spot, where they made a makeshift memorial for Min and Hyun-Ju. Chae-youn shows Ahn of Min’s pen drive presumably with the dealings of Hwang and his cronies, as stolen by Hyun-Ju. In court, Hwang, Park, Son, and Chae-young appear, with Chae-young as a prime witness. The pen drive is revealed to the court as evidence, and the film ends with Chae-young reciting an oath.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Son Ye-jin as Ha Chae-yoon[8]

    Hyun Bin as Min Tae-gu[9]

    Supporting[edit]

    Kim Sang-ho as Ahn Hyuk-soo

    Jang Young-Nam as Section Chief Han

    Jang Gwang as Hwang Soo-suk

    Choi Byung-mo as Secretary Kong[10]

    Jo Young-jin as Chairman Koo

    Kim Jong-goo as CEO Yoon

    Yoo Yeon-soo as Chief Moon

    Lee Joo-young as Lee Da-bin

    Kim Min-sang as Deputy Department Head Park

    Park Sung-Geun as Operation officer

    Han Ki-Joon as Lieutenant General Son

    Park Soo-young as Section Chief Choi

    Jung In-gyeom as Lee Sang-mok

    Lee Si-a as Yoo Yeon-Joo

    Lee Hak-joo as Park Min-woo

    Special appearance[edit]

    Lee Moon-sikas Capt. Jung

    Production[edit]

    Principal photography began on June 17, 2017, in PajuGyeonggi Province.[11][12][13]

    Release[edit]

    The film premiered in South Korea on September 19, 2018.[14][15]

    By September 2018, the film was sold to over 22 countries. It was released in North America on September 20, in Singapore, Malaysia, and Brunei on October 4, in Hong Kong and Macau in early October, in Vietnam and Taiwan on October 19, and in Indonesia on October 24, 2018.[16][17]

    The film was released on VOD services and digital downloads on October 17, 2018.[18]

     

    Comment: This very engaging police thriller taking place in Bangkok and Seoul.

    Usual high-level political corruption and rich people behaving badly.  Also features a woman protagonist who goes against her superiors and saves the day.

     

    End comment

     

    No exit  movie

     

    Comment:

     

    Another engaging police crime drama.  Very engrossing and great acting. Takes place in Cheju who a mafia figure who goes on the run after being betrayed by his boss.

     

    End comment

     

    https://mydramalist.com/28794-exit

    This was another great Korean movie. It was packed with action and comedy. This movie kept you on edge on your seat and glued your eyes to the screen. I love how Jo Jung Suk always keeps his quirky side whenever he played a character. He never disappoints me in the comedy area. Love him in dramas and movies.

    Images for no exit k drama

     

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    EXIT (2018) – MyDramaList

    https://mydramalist.com/28771-exit

    Exit is an interesting drama with an old concept depicted in a new way. The entire two hours were engrossing for me and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Choi Tae Joon was natural, strong, and intense in playing his role and the rest of the cast also did a pretty good job. The background score is quite good though it has no OSTs. Two hours is not much.

     

    Exit (Korean Drama, 2018, 엑시트) @ Han Cinema

    https://www.hancinema.net/korean_drama_Exit.php

    Exit (Korean Drama, 2018, 엑시트) – Find the cast, latest updates, latest news, legal streaming links, DVDs, Blu-rays, collectibles, latest trailers, latest …

     

     

     

    Sisyphus: The Myth (2021)

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    An unfathomable incident introduces a genius engineer to dangerous secrets of the world — and to a woman from the future who’s come looking for him. Han Tae Sul, a co-founder of Quantum and Time, is a genius engineer with the highest level of coding skills and outstanding looks that outweighs his engineer fashion sense. Due to his innovative achievements, Quantum and Time is a world-class company, dubbed “The Miracle of South Korea’s Engineering Industry.” In reality, Tae Sul has constantly caused his company’s stocks to fluctuate after his brother’s death ten years ago. One day, he witnesses something unbelievable. To reach the truth, he sets off on a dangerous journey. Kang Seo Hai is a survivor of a future dystopian world. With the survival skills that she’s learned from living amongst gangsters and warlords, she travels back to save Han Tae Sul. (Source: Netflix, Newsmen) Edit Translation

    English

    Native Title: 시지프스: The Myth

    Also Known As Sisyphus: The Fable, Sipleses, Sisyphus

    Director: Jin Hyeon

    Screenwriter: Jeon Chan HoLee Je In

    Genres: ActionThrillerMysteryRomanceDramaFantasy

    Tags: Time TravelGeniusRich Male LeadUncover A TruthDeath Of SiblingEngineerSassy Female LeadPre-producedStrong Female LeadFuture (Vote or add tags)

    Where to Watch Sisyphus: The Myth

    Netflix

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    Cast & Credits

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    Jo Seung Woo

    Han Tae Sul

    Main Role

    Park Shin Hye

    Kang Seo Hai

    Main Role

    Kim Byung Chula

    Seo Won Ju / “Sigma”

    Main Role

    Sung Dong-Il

    President Park [President of Asia Mart]

    Support Role

    Tae In Ho

    Eddie Kim / Kim Seung Bok [Tae Sul’s friend / Co-founder of Quantum & Time]

    Support Role

    Chae Jong Hyeon

    Sun / Choi Jae Sun [Chinese restaurant delivery guy]

    Support Role

     

    All you need is love

    Sisyphus: The Myth is an intriguing drama. The thrilling teaser that was released late last year stoked the flames of excitement for many avid K-drama viewers. Coupled with a cast that’s headlined by bankable stars the likes of Cho Seung Woo and Park Shin Hye, it became one of the most talked-about and highly anticipated shows for 2021. When it finally aired, however, it polarized opinions here in MDL and left several viewers’ expectations somewhat unfulfilled, to the extent that the ratings steadily declined to the current score hovering at around 8.

    Some continued to enjoy the show, for various reasons, and I happen to be one of them. Allow me to share my (spoiler-free) thoughts and then you can make your own decision on whether or not to embark on what has largely been a fun-filled escapist roller coaster ride.

    What is it about?
    In a nutshell, a woman from the dystopian future of South Korea travels back in time in the hopes of altering the course of history by preventing the seemingly inevitable fate that befell the country, the looming catastrophe of nuclear war. Central to this mission is the man who invented the time-traveling machine. These two characters are played by Park Shin Hye and Cho Seung Woo respectively.

    The drama contains a mix of science fiction, action, drama, and romance genres imbued with themes of revenge, redemption, remorse, love, friendship, and familial bond. The director is Jin Hyeon, who notably helmed The Legend of the Blue Sea, The Master’s Sun, and City Hunter, among others. The screenplay is written by the husband and wife team of Jeon Chan Ho and Lee Je In, for only their third production.

    This show is jointly produced by Drama House and JTBC and has been publicized as the network’s 10th-anniversary special drama. Its title is derived from the ancient character from Greek mythology, King Sisyphus of Corinth, and is completely pre-produced with principal photography that has taken place toward the end of 2020.

    What’s great about it?

    The Production Values
    As expected of a JTBC production, this drama is very well, made. I love the cinematography (in particular the indoor lighting), the many gorgeous scenic views of both Seoul in the present time and the vast landscape of the dystopian future. The set designs for various settings are quite exemplary while the special effects (CGIs, firefights, and pyrotechnics) are considered top tier for a show of this nature.

    The Acting and Cast
    In my humble opinion, the leads are fantastic and I have absolutely no complaints. While Cho Seung Woo fully embodies the character of Han Tae Sul, the same goes for Park Shin Hye’s Kang Seo Hai. They deliver very strong performances in their portrayal of deeply flawed and emotionally scarred individuals. These are the types of roles that perhaps mature actors with adequate professional and life experiences are better-equipped to articulate and convey convincingly, which is very much the case here.

    It’s interesting to note that unlike Cho Seung Woo’s other more serious roles, especially that of Hwang Shi Mock in Stranger, here his Han Tae Sul is much more comedic and mischievous with a copious dose of flamboyance and swagger. Despite possessing similar social awkwardness, this character is remarkably more fun while his ingenuity in getting out of tricky situations bears an uncanny resemblance to the MacGyver persona.

    Such nuanced characterization is depicted by the other veteran supporting cast as well, notably Sung Dong Il, Kim Byung Chula, and Kim Jong Tae. Kim Byung Chula in particular surprised me with his depiction of Seo Won Ju. Despite being slightly OTT, I suspect he had the time of his life being “unleashed” from his usual more understated roles. Here he plays “dual characters” where his versatility is quite commendable.

    Special mention goes to the young actor Lee Joo Won, who plays the young version of Seo Won Ju. This kid truly gave me goosebumps with his chilling portrayal.

    The Action
    For the most part, the choreography has been outstanding. From the numerous unarmed combat sequences to the firefights involving some pretty impressive military hardware. It’s not often that we see plenty of intense (and at times, logic-defying) gun battles in a non-military drama so this aspect of the production is indeed praiseworthy. Other forms of action include a lot of hard running in chasing (and being chased by) a multitude of characters.

    The Romance
    This particular theme is so beautifully and convincingly conveyed. It helps immensely that Cho Seung Woo and Park Shin Hye abundantly possess such wonderful chemistry which is poignantly manifested amidst the ensuing intrigue and mayhem. The pairing of Han Tae Sul and Kang Seo Hai, in many ways, makes a lot of sense. They are each plagued by a traumatic past and rendered seriously flawed, emotionally damaged, and are now fighting against the odds to change their fate.

    What could’ve been better?

    The Science
    I love the concept here about time traveling to the past to change the future which gives me vibes of The Twelve Monkeys where the premise is quite similar. However, I do feel that the science as depicted in the show is super messy. Many technical aspects are open to interpretation and left to the viewers to fill in the blanks, as the story progresses. It’s a process of trial and error where we discover new things during every episode. The finale is quite possibly the most mind-blowing of all.

    The Screenplay
    A parallel narrative and converging plot format are used to tell the story, which includes numerous flashbacks and flashforwards by various major characters in multiple timelines – the past, present, and future. Sometimes title cards are used to indicate the date, but not when the scene is obvious. It can get a little disorienting unless viewers pay close attention to the details.

    How and why certain events transpire are quite convoluted and require too much deductive reasoning to derive a sense of what the answers could be. The credibility of certain characters is questionable while quite a number of the sequences appear utterly ridiculous and fantastical, despite the sci-fi tag. The seeming lack of logic in certain respects of the overarching plot has led me to strongly suspect the screenwriters were high on recreational psychoactive substances as they were writing this.

    Overall
    The sooner viewers suspend disbelief and forgo questioning how the technology works by accepting the science as it is, the less confusing the show would appear to be. Regardless of the perceived weaknesses resulting from the flawed execution of the concept, I found myself enjoying the wild and, at times, exhilarating ride once I shut down my cerebral process and went instinctive. I would advise you to do the same for this is the only way to truly appreciate Sisyphus: The Myth. And if you do decide to watch this, be rest assured – the ending is very much a happy one, for everyone (kind of).

    Mediocre Myth

    At outset, the drama starts as an interesting and pioneering perspective of time travel. With the use of new ideas like uploader and downloader, the science-fiction aspect is on par with that of the contemporary world of science fiction entertainment.

    Along with this, is the backdrop of a nuclear war involving Koreas, it provides an exquisite playing field for proficient storytelling. These themes remind me of the “TENET” movie.

    The show is almost convincible scientifically about time travel*. But that’s where the spectacle of this show ends. This show has countless flaws.

    One, after setting the story, the show becomes more character-driven and not plot-driven. Thus, giving little scope for further exploring the sci-fi elements or packing it with more plot elements. Viewers are taken through detailed narratives about various side characters. These insights could have been less detailed.

    Two, Will over Wits. Almost every scene has some sort of test for characters to make a choice. Almost every character ends up making emotion-driven decisions and not reason-driven. This leads to a countless loop of bad folks coercing good folks to fall into their traps. Countless episodes are wasted in these cat-and-mouse endeavors.

    Three, Lack of an alternate answer to the recurring question “Girl or World?” Right in the first instance of asking this question, the answer is undeniably obvious. Yet, the protagonist delays to choose the answer giving false hope of the possibility of an alternative answer. Had this been answered earlier, it would have ended the show quicker.

    Four, Romance: The Leads’ relationship feels more like comradeship and less like a romantic one. If at all it is present, it is not so passionate and intense given their life-threatening circumstances.

    Five, the beginning of the time loop. How did all this begin that is, the events right before the first loop are hardly explained. I believe that explaining a bootstrap paradox is an unimaginable task.

    Despite the flaws, there are a couple of appreciable elements like One, ambitious production. The initial fights and stunts scenes felt amateurish in CGI. But the events of the future were well, produced. The drone chase scene was a personal favorite. The fights scenes were really good, especially the last fight of the future timeline. Two, despite the ever-looming question of “save the world”, the intermittent scenes of future events were very imaginative. Three, Badass FL and Genius ML both bring something unique to the plot. Four, the “Act of Kindness” (without letting the spoiler out), was the best moment in the entire drama and gave the best “glimmer of hope”, an essential feature of the Sci-Fi genre.

    Acting-wise, both the leads are exceptional. PSH stunt scenes are awe-worthy. Kim Byung Chula does an incredible job. Music-wise, I liked the title music of whizzing sound and the end song. Rewatch value is lower as sci-fi elements are hardly convoluted.

    Sisyphus: The Myth is an inventive concept but fails in storytelling.
    ~~
    *Logical inconsistencies do exist.

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    I have to agree with the consensus on this one.  It just did not work for me.  The plot was just too convoluted and contradictory.  The acting was superb but the writing was sub-par particularly the ending.   One principle of creative writing is that when you write you are creating an alternative world.  And every world has rules.  Violating the rules of your alternative universe leaves the readers or viewers confused, disappointed, or even angry.  The special effects were good, not great. The plot had too many holes in it.  In the end, it was defeated by the writing.   End comment

     

    Space Sweepers K SF Drama

     

    Space Sweepers

    Space Sweepers is a 2021 South Korean space Western film directed by Jo Sung-hee, starring Song Jong-ki, Kim Tae-Ri, Jin Seon-kyu, and Yoo Hai-jin. Regarded as the first Korean space blockbuster, it was released on Netflix on February 5, 2021.Wikipedia

    Director Sung-hee

    Produced by: Yoon In-beom, Kim Soo-jin

    Writer(s): Yoon Seung-min, Yoo-king Seo-ae, Jo Sung-hee

    Space Sweepers (Korean: 승리호; Hanja: 勝利號; RR: Sangho; lit. Spaceship Victory) is a 2021 South Korean space Western film directed by Jo Sung-hee, starring Song Jong-kiKim Tae-RiJin Seon-kyu, and Yoo Hae-jin.[2] Regarded as the first Korean space blockbuster,[3] it was released on Netflix on February 5, 2021.[4][5]

    In the year 2092, Earth has become nearly uninhabitable. The UTS Corporation builds a new orbiting home for humanity that mimics the natural processes on Earth; however, only a chosen few are permitted to ascend and become UTS citizens, while those remaining on Earth breathe polluted air.

    To regulate the population in orbit and keep an eye on the non-citizens, UTS governs them via a strict set of rules and taxes. Many non-citizens from all across the globe work as space sweepers, collecting space debris floating in Earth’s orbit and selling it to the company factory for survival. The plot follows such a crew of space sweepers and their ship, the Victory.

    Victory’s crew has Kim Tae-ho, Tiger Park, and Bubs (an android), all led by Captain Jang. Tiger Park handles the ship’s machinery and was a drug baron on Earth. Bubs used to be a robot soldier but now helps repair the ship and cast the net for space junk while saving up to get a complete skin graft. Jang was one of the child geniuses sponsored by UTS and created several hi-tech inventions for the company but, after discovering the company’s true workings, became a pirate and tried to assassinate James Sullivan. Her crew was killed and Sullivan survived, so she changed identities and had an eye transplant. Tae-ho, once a child soldier, is on a search for his daughter (Su-ni); who was lost and ejected into space after space debris collided with the station they were staying at. His sole life aim is to pay for the authorities’ recovery team to locate her body tracker before she drifts out of orbit and gets lost in space forever.

    After picking up a car floating in orbit, they discover a child in it. News reports say that she is a robot named Dorothy, and has a weapon of mass destruction inside her created by the terrorist group Black Fox. The crew also finds a smartphone in Dorothy’s bag with several missed calls from someone named Kang Hyeon-u. They call back and, assuming the other party to be part of the Black Fox group, negotiate two million dollars for returning Dorothy. Tiger finds Dorothy drawing in his cabin and starts a conversation with her, as he finds himself drawn to her.

    Tae-ho and Tiger carry Dorothy to a nightclub to collect the ransom, but she wanders off in the crowd. UTS soldiers have lain in wait, and a massacre ensues. Tiger and Tae-ho locate Dorothy when Soldier 01 zeroes in and shoots at them. Dorothy’s eyes change color, and the trio is protected from the blast by a sort of force field around them. Jang is watching everything through a feed on the ship. She also notices the man who came to collect Dorothy shouting after her and calling her Kotani. The trio makes it back to the ship, and Dorothy busies herself drawing and playing. When asked by Jang what her name is, Dorothy says Kotani is her Korean name. Tae-ho ignores her, thinking she is a robot, while Tiger becomes friendly with her and suggests keeping her. Tae-ho dismisses the idea and goes to sets up another call with Kang Hyeon-u to rearrange the exchange.

    Dorothy and Tae-ho find tomatoes on the plant that Dorothy had helped revive from a dead tree, and sell them. Jang finds papers in Dorothy’s backpack and goes through them. Bubs put makeup on Dorothy and tell her the story of Tae-ho; as a child soldier, Tae-ho was Soldier 01 at the age of 17. On one of his voyages, Tae-ho shot and boarded a ship that carried several fleeing non-citizens and killed them all. He noticed a baby still alive in the arms of a dead woman and adopted the girl. She rekindled his humanity and Tae-ho found himself unable to hurt others – as a result, he was dismissed from the force, made homeless, and reduced to a non-citizen. After one year of homelessness, Tae-ho became desperate and gambled, neglecting Su-ni. She wandered away to find a snack, and while outside there was a debris impact that caused her to be blown into space, with Tae-ho helplessly witnessing it from an airlock.

    A masked man follows Kotani to the toilet in the factory. Her screams alert Tae-ho and Tiger, who rush to save her but are ambushed by a group of masked people. Tiger beats them all and Jang intervenes, discovering they are other space junk collectors working with Black Fox. Their leader, Karuma, explains that Black Fox is not a terrorist organization, but rather an environmental group and that Kotani is not an android but a human child. Born with a congenital disease, her father Kang Hyeon-u injected her with nanobots found in space debris to save her life. The nanobots helped not only saved Kotani but also gave her a unique power: Kotani could now communicate with other nanobots and heal and protect things. Sullivan found this out and used Kotani to turn Mars into a healthy, green planet. He now plans to kill Dorothy in a hydrogen bomb explosion (since nanobots can only be destroyed by breaking them into atoms through extremely high temperatures). Given its proximity to Earth, the explosion would cause the factory to fall onto the planet, destroying the Earth and making Mars the only viable option for all humans.

    The crew decides to unite Kotani with her father and disable the bomb, with the help of the Black Foxes who will locate and take Dr. Kang to the meeting point. Soldiers attack them, but Tae-ho and Kotani manage to flee on the Victory. They enter a space debris field, where nanobots begin to consume their ship. Kotani communicates with them, and the nanobots disperse. They enter the factory where the meet-up is scheduled, only to be ambushed. The UTS soldiers kill all the Black Foxes and Dr. Kang before kidnapping Kotani. Sullivan leaves Tae-ho four million dollars in return for abandoning Kotani. Tae-ho takes the money, but the rest decide to save Kotani – even if it kills them. Tae-ho goes to give the money to the UTS officers, and they hand over Su-no’s last found remains to him – her clothes, crayons, and Korean writing book. In it, Su-ni had written that she wanted to be a good person like her father. This reminds Tae-ho of the promise he made to Su-ni, to be the best man she had ever known. He takes back the money and returns to the ship with a new zeal before they all go to save Kotani.

    Sullivan goes live, announcing the Mars program. The bomb has been armed in the factory, and Kotani is strapped to it on a chair. The team frees Kotani, but Jang discovers that the bomb cannot be defused. It will not only destroy anything in its blast range but also destroy any nanobots in the vicinity of 5,000 kilometers. The only way Kotani’s nanobots (and her life) can be saved is if she is out of range. The team sets off to fly 5,000 km away, but is interrupted by Soldier 01; Tiger fights her and ejects her from the factory. The team sends out a message to the rest of the Space Sweepers, who come to their aid, fighting the attacking troops. The population of Earth learns of Sullivan’s true goals when they hear him recount his plan through the Space Sweepers’ emergency comm channel. The Victory is intercepted by Sullivan himself, who tries to fight the crew to get back Kotani. When it seems they have lost the battle, Tiger and Tae-ho manage a final boost that puts the ship just out of the blast range. The crew reveals their real plan: Kotani was left safely behind with other Space Sweepers. The Victory had removed the bomb from the core and carried it away, ready to sacrifice their lives to save Earth and Kotani. The bomb explodes; however, Kotani has summoned the nanobots to protect the Victory, keeping the crew safe.

    In the aftermath of the battle, UTS apologizes for the cover-up of the true goals and promise to help make Earth more habitable. Kotani is adopted by the crew and, using her powers, enables Tae-Ho to say goodbye to Su-ni. Bubs get her skin graft. Tiger and Tae-Ho take Kotani down to Earth to help grow trees and they all continue space sweeping.

    Cast[edit]

    Song Jong-ki as Kim Tae-ho – Former Commander of the Space Guards and the first-ever UTS Genius.

    Kim Tae-Ri as Captain Jang / Jang Hyun-sook – Former Special Forces Squad officer who later deserted her post to create her pirate organization. She attempted to assassinate CEO James Sullivan in which her entire pirate crew was killed.

    Jin Seon-kyu as Tiger Park / Park Kyung-soo – Former Drug King who escaped Earth after being arrested and sentenced to death.

    Yoo Hai-jin as Robot Bubs – Former military robot trying to save up for her gender confirmation services

    Richard Armitage as James Sullivan – The CEO of UTS.

    Kim Mu-yell as Kang Hyeon-u – Kang Kotani’s father and a scientist.

    Park Ye-rim as Dorothy / Kang Kotani – First believed to be a robot, she is a human who was injected with nanobots by her father as a last resort to heal her.

    Kim Hyang-gi as Bubs’ new body

     

     

    Comment: an enjoyable dystopian story taking place in space after much of the earth is uninhabitable and a Mars colonization drive is launched.  Usual political and corporate corruption and rich people behaving badly.   The romance between the lead characters is hinted at but never resolved.  The child star is the future star in the making.  The dialogue was well done.   I enjoyed this one. End comment

     

    The Last Man Standing K Drama

     

     

    The Man Standing Next

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    The Man Standing Next
    South Korean theatrical release poster
    Hangul 남산의 부장들
    Hanja 南山의 部長들
    Directed by Woo Min-ho
    Screenplay by Woo Min-ho

    Lee Ji-min

    Produced by Kim Chula-Yong
    Starring Lee Byung-Hun

    Lee Sung-min

    Kwak Do-won

    Lee Hee-Joon

    Cinematography Go, Nakasone,
    Edited by Jeong Ji-eon
    Music by Jo Yeong-wok
    Production
    company
    Hive Media Corp.
    Distributed by Showbox
    Release date 22 January 2020
    Running time 114 min
    Language Korean
    Budget $18 million
    Box office $34.7 million[1]

    The Man Standing Next (Korean: 남산의 부장들; Hanja: 南山의 部長들; RR: Nnamani bujangdeul; lit. Chiefs of Namsan) is a 2020 South Korean political drama film directed by Woo Min-ho. Based on an original novel of the same title, the film stars Lee Byung-HunLee Sung-minKwak Do-won, and Lee Hee-Joon as the high ranking officials of the Korean government and the Korean Central Intelligence Agency (KCIA) during the presidency of Park Chung-hee 40 days before his assassination in 1979.[2]

     

    Comment:  this one resonates with me.  My Korean adventures began in August 1979 a few months before the assassination that changed modern Korean history occurred.  I had just arrived in Korea and had finished up my training. We were due to go to our assignments but the assassination occurred and we were sent to Seoul to wait to see if Peace Corps Korea would be pulled out. We were cleared to go to our assignments in early November 1979.

    The drama hints at an alleged US CIA plot to take out Park Chung-hee. Not sure I believe that the US CIA had anything to do with it but perhaps we at least knew in advance and did nothing to stop it.   The drama was well done, well written, with great dialogue, and well reflects the tensions of the period.

    End Comment

    Mr. Sunshine

     

     

    DP

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

    A gripping drama based on true events about life in the Korean military and why some soldiers run away from their obligations amid the constant harassment and strict discipline of the Korean military. This drama hit a nerve among many Koreans who recall their trouble times in the military. The military has announced that they are discontinuing the DP unit but swore it had nothing to do with this drama.

     

     

    D.P. (TV series)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    D.P.
    Promotional poster
    Korean 디피
    Genre Drama

    Military

    Based on D.P Dog’s Day
    by Kim Bo-tong
    Screenplay by Kim Bo-tong

    Han Jun-hee

    Directed by Han Jun-hee
    Starring Jung Hae-in

    Koo Kyo-hwan

    Kim Sung-kyun

    Son Seok-Koo

    Composer Primary
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 6
    Production
    Executive producers Bien Seung-min

    Han Jun-hee

    Producer Kim Dong-min
    Cinematography Yoo Ji-sun
    Editor Park Min-sun
    Running time 45–55 minutes
    Production companies Climax Studio

    Shortcake

    Distributor Netflix
    Release
    Original network Netflix
    Original release August 27, 2021

    D.P. (an acronym for Deserter Pursuit) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Han Jun-hee, from a screenplay by Kim Bo-tong and Han, based on the Lashing webtoon D.P Dog’s Day by Kim. The series stars Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-kyun, and Son Seok-Koo.[1][2] It premiered in six parts on Netflix on August 27, 2021.[3][4]

    Synopsis[edit]

    Set in 2014, D.P. tells the story of a team of Korean military police with their mission to catch deserters.

    The series magnifies the undesirable nature of the military, especially within a South Korean context. The widespread bullying and hazing as well as the mindset for the “survival of the fittest” are rife, with those presumed the “weakest” thrown to the bottom of the pile and served horrifying experiences at the hands of their superiors and compatriots.

    Private Ahn Joon-ho and Corporal Han Ho-Yul both team up to find the deserters, and end up on an adventurous journey.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Jung Hae-in as Private Ahn Joon-ho

    Koo Kyo-hwan as Corporal Han Ho-Yul

    Kim Sung-Kyun as Sergeant First Class Park Bum-gu

    Son Seok-Koo as Captain Im Ji-sup

    Supporting[edit]

    Jo Hyun-churl as Jo Suk-bong

    Shin Seung-ho as Hwang Jang-soo

    Park Se-joon as Heo Ki-young

    Park Jung-woo as Shin Woo-suk

    Kim Dong-young as Choi Joon-mok

    Lee Jun-young as Jung Hyun-min

    Choi Joon-young as Heo Chi-do

    Moon Sang-hoon as Kim Roo-ri

    Hyun Bong-sik as Chun Yong-duck

    Hong Kyung as Ryu Yi-Kang

    Bae Yoo-ram as Kim Kyu

    Han Woo-Yul as Tae Sung-goon

    Guest[edit]

    Go Kyung-pyro as Corporal Park Sung-woo (Ep. 1)

    Kwon Hae-Hyo as Ahn Joon-ho’s father (Eps. 1, 3–4)

    Lee Seol as Shin Woo-Seok’s sister (Eps. 1 & 6)

    Lee Jong-ok as an hinoeuma employee (Ep. 2)

    Episodes[edit]

    No. Title Directed by Written by Original release date
    1 “A Man Holding Flowers” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
    2 “Daydream” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
    3 “That Woman” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
    4 “The Monty Hall Problem” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
    5 “Military Dog” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021
    6 “Onlookers” Han Jun-hee Kim Bo-tong & Han Jun-hee August 27, 2021

    Production[edit]

    Development[edit]

    In late June 2020, Lashing officially announced that Lashing Studio and Homemade Film would co-produce a 6-part adaptation of the hit webtoon D.P: Dog Days by Kim Bo-tong, to be released exclusively through Netflix.[5][6] The story is based on Kim’s own experience during his mandatory military service.[7]

    Director and co-writer Han Jun-hee had wanted to work on the webtoon’s adaptation “for five or six years [before he] finally got a chance” to do so.[8] Though Ahn Joon-ho is a Corporal in the webtoon, Han wanted him to be a Private in the series so people could “resonate with the story and consider Joon-ho as a friend who just started his military service.”[9]

    Casting[edit]

    On September 3, 2020, Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-Kyun, and Son Seok-Koo were confirmed to star in the series.[10][11] Koo’s character does not appear in the webtoon, which he found “hard but exciting to portray a character exclusive to the series.”[12] To prepare for his role, Koo received help from his road manager who was part of the D.P. team during his military service.[13] As for Jung, he practiced boxing for three months before filming began, to do his action scenes.[14]

    Kim Bo-tong, who wrote the webtoon and co-wrote the series, commented that he “never dreamed of such a cast. They fit so perfectly into their roles that it seems like the roles were written for them.”[15]

    Filming[edit]

    Principal photography began in the summer of 2020.[16]

    Reception[edit]

    Audience viewership[edit]

    Following its release, the series topped Netflix’s Top 10 in South Korea.[17]

    Critical response[edit]

    William Schwartz of Han Cinema praised Jung Hae-in‘s acting, commenting that he “is sublime here, in a brooding cinematic role radically different from the romances he’s better known for.” He added that “D.P. is worth watching, not just by people curious what South Korean mandatory military service is like, but anyone from any country who’s seriously thinking about joining up.”[18]

    Pierce Conran of the South China Morning Post gave the series a 4.5/5 rating, noting that “D.P. hits home with a story that spans the past and present, as it acknowledges that yesterday’s problems can still be today’s.” He also praised the cinematography as well as Jung and Koo’s “electric chemistry”.[19] Daniel Hart of Ready Steady Cut also rated the series 4.5 stars out of 5, describing it as “the finest K-Drama mini-series this year.”[20]

    Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek rated the series 4.3/5, noting that “D.P. is a stunning Korean drama [which] takes an unflinching look at bullying, the effect it has on mental health and larger societal questions about the mandatory military service in Korea” and praising the series for its “impressive” cinematography and for the way it “explore[s] a very sensitive and prevalent topic in a raw, artistic and unflinching way.”[21]

    In a mixed review, Hitzig Jumaine of NME gave the series a 3/5 rating, commenting that “Kim Bo-tong and Han Jun-hee must be given credit for how this series tackles such extraordinarily difficult and tragic subject matter with compassion and sensitivity”, and praising the “uniformly excellent performances, splendid cinematography, addictive pacing, and intrepid commitment to shedding light on the appalling culture of bullying in the military”, but criticizing the “weak characterization [of the] three main leads” as well as the “ludicrous escalation of events during its climax, which suddenly turns a fairly grounded show into a melodramatic action thriller.”[22]

     

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

     

    Squid Games

     

    The top show on Netflix is not only in the US but also in Korea.  Reminiscent of both the “Maze”,  the “Hunger Games”, and the” Cube “ but done in a K Drama way. And addictive!

     

     

    Squid Game

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    Squid Game
    Promotional poster
    Also known as Round Six
    Hangul 오징어게임
    Revised Romanization Owing-ego Gem
    McCune–Reischauer Jingo Kemi
    Genre Actionadventure

    Suspense

    Survival

    Drama

    Created by Netflix
    Written by Hwang Dong-hyuk
    Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk
    Starring Lee Jung-Jae

    Park Hae-soo

    Wi Ha-joon

    Composer Jung Jae-il
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 1
    No. of episodes 9 (list of episodes)
    Production
    Camera setup Multi-camera
    Running time 32–63 minutes
    Production company Siren Pictures Inc.[1]
    Distributor Netflix
    Release
    Original network Netflix
    Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

    Dolby visión

    Audio format Dolby Atmos
    Original release September 17, 2021

    Squid Game (Korean: 오징어게임; RR: Jingle Gem) is a South Korean survival drama streaming television series written and directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk. The nine-episode series, starring Lee Jung-JaePark Hae-soo, and Wi Ha-Joon, tells the story of a group of people who risk their lives in a mysterious survival game with a 45.6 billion (US$38.7 million) prize.[2][3] It was released worldwide on September 17, 2021, by Netflix.[4][5]

    Premise

    Four hundred and fifty-six people, who have all struggled financially in life, are invited to play a mysterious survival competition. Competing in a series of traditional children’s games but with deadly twists, they risk their lives to compete for a 45.6 billion (US$38.5 million) prize.

    Cast and characters

    This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.
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    Players

    Main characters[6]

    Lee Jung-Jae as Seong Gi-Hun (No. 456)[7]

    A chauffeur and a gambling addict, he lives with his mother and struggles to financially support his daughter. He participates in the Game to settle his many debts.

    Park Hae-soo as Cho Sang-woo (No. 218)

    The head of the investment team at a securities company, he was a junior to Gi-Hun, and was a gifted student who entered Seoul National University, but is now wanted by the police for stealing money from his clients.

    Oh Yeong-su as Oh Il-name (No. 001)

    An elderly man with a brain tumor prefers playing the Game to waiting to die on the outside.

    Hyeon Jung as Kang Sae-beak (No. 067)

    North Korean defector enters the Game to pay for a broker that can find and retrieve her surviving family members from the country.

    Heo Sung-tea as Jang Deok-su (No. 101)

    A gangster enters the Game to settle his massive gambling debts.

    Anupam Tripathi as Abdul Ali (No. 199)

    A foreign worker from Pakistan enters the Game to provide for his young family after his employer refuses to pay him for months.

    Kim Joo-young as Han Mi-no (No. 212)

    A mysterious and manipulative woman who claims to be a poor single mother.[8]

    Supporting characters

    Yoo Sung-joo as Byeong-gi (No. 111)

    A doctor secretly works with a group of corrupt guards trafficking dead participants’ organs in exchange for information on upcoming games.

    Lee Yoo-mi as Ji-Yeong (No. 240)

    A young woman was just released from prison after killing her abusive father.

    Kim Si-Hyun as No. 244

    A pastor who finds his faith again in the Game.

    Minor characters

    Lee Sang-hee as No. 017

    A glass-maker with more than 30 years’ experience.

    Kim Yun-tea as No. 069

    A player who joins the Game with his wife, No. 070

    Lee Ji-ha as No. 070

    A player who joins the game with her husband, No. 069

    Kwak Ja-young as No. 278

    A player who joins Deok-sun’s group and acts as his henchman.

    Chris Chan / Chris Lag hit[9] as No. 276

    A player who joins Seong Gi-Hun’s group on the Tug of War round.

    Game staff

    Gong Yoo is a salesman who recruits participants for the Game (Special appearance, Episodes 1 and 9)[10]

    Lee Byung-Hun as The Front Man (Special appearance, Episodes 8–9)

    Civilians

    Main characters

    Wi Ha-joon as Hwang Jun-ho[11]

    A police officer sneaks into the Game to find his missing brother.

    Supporting characters

    Kim Young-ok as Gi-Hun’s mother

    Cho Ah-in as Seong Ga-Yeong, Gi-Hun’s daughter

    Kang Mal-gum as Gi-Hun’s ex-wife and Ga-Yeong’s mother

    Park Hye-jin as Sang-woo’s mother

    Park Si-wan as Kang Cheol, Sae-book’s brother

    English cast (dubbing)

    Greg Chun as Seong Gi-Hun

    Stephen Fu as Cho Sang-woo

    Paul Nakache as Jang Deok-su

    Hideo Kimura as Oh Il-name

    Vivian Lu as Kang Sae-beak

    Rama Valéry as Abdul Ali

    Tom Choi as Front Man

    Donald Chang as Hwang Jun-ho

    Stephanie Komura as Han Mi-no

    Yuki Luna as Ji-yeong

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

     

    Move to Heaven is a heart-wrenching drama about a “Rain man” like character who worked with his father in a trauma clean-up business cleaning up after the recently deceased.  His father dies and his father’s deadbeat brother shows up as his guardian.

     

    Move to Heaven (Korean: 무브 투 헤븐: 나는 유품정리사입니다; RR: Mubeen to hereon: Naneun yupumjeongnisaimnida) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Kim Sung-ho and written by Yoon Ji-rye on. It is an original Netflix series, starring Lee Je-hoonTang Joon-sangJi Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee. The series follows Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), a young man with Asperger syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), his guardian. Working as trauma cleaners, they uncover untold stories.[1][2] The series was released worldwide by Netflix on May 14, 2021.[3]

     

     

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

    Another K Drama I liked was “Mad About You”.

    The acting was first-rate, the storyline intriguing, and covers some contemporary issues including adultery, cyberbullying, and the like.

    “About two people with their own painful stories who go through a complicated process of hurting and healing while falling in love with each other. No HI Oh is a detective in the violent crimes division of the Gangnam Police Station. He thinks that he is doing well until his life suddenly takes a turn and he becomes a “crazy” person who can’t hold in his anger about anything. Lee Min Kyung is a woman who is caught up in her delusions and compulsions. She had lived an ordinary life as a pretty woman with a respectable job until “that incident” caused everything in her life to break down. As a result, she was unable to trust anyone and is caught in a prison of her own making. Her delusions also have the unfortunate side effect of making everyone else around her angry. (Source: Suomi)”

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

     

    Heist – not a K Drama, more of an S Drama but pretty good, but went on too long.  Should have ended with the first season.  There were lots of unanswered questions –

     

    Who is behind the Professor?  Obviously could not have pulled it off himself. There are hints that he is connected to shadowy and Serbian forces and has some inside info from the police and security forces.

     

    The politics got a bit too left-wing conspiracy for my taste as well.

     

    Money Heist

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    Money Heist
    Spanish La casa de papal
    Genre Crime drama[1]

    Heist[2]

    Thriller[3]

    Created by Alex Pina
    Starring Úrsula Corbera

    Álvaro Morte

    Itziar Ituño

    Pedro Alonso

    Paco Tous

    Alba Flores

    Miguel Herrán

    Jaime Lorente

    Esther Acebo

    Enrique Arce

    María Pedraza

    Darlo Peri

    Kita Máncer

    Ovil Keuchkerian

    Luka peros

    Belén Cuesta

    Fernando Cayo

    Rodrigo de la Serna

    Najwa Nimr

    Theme music composer Manel Santisteban
    Opening theme My Life Is Going On” by Cecilia Krull
    Composers Manel Santisteban

    Iván Martínez La cámara

    Country of origin Spain
    Original language Spanish
    No. of seasons 3 (5 parts)[a]
    No. of episodes 36 (list of episodes)
    Production
    Executive producers Álex Pina

    Sonia Martínez

    Jesús Colmenar

    Esther Martínez Lobato

    Nacho Manaban

    Production locations Spain

    Italy

    Thailand

    Panama

    Denmark

    Portugal

    Cinematography Miguel Amodeo
    Editors David Pelegrín

    Luis Miguel González Bedmar

    Verónica Callón

    Raúl Mora

    Regino Hernández

    Raquel Maraca

    Patricia Rubio

    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 67–77 minutes (Antenna 3)
    41–61 minutes (Netflix)
    Production companies Transmedia

    Vancouver Media

    Distributor Antenna 3 Televisión

    Netflix

    Release
    Original network Antenna 3 (2017)

    Netflix (2019–present)

    Picture format 1080p (16:9 HDTV)

    4K (Ultra HD) (16:9 UHDTV)

    Dolby Vision

    Audio format Dolby Atmos
    Original release 2 May 2017 –
    present
    External links
    Website

    Money Heist (Spanish: La casa de papal, “The House of Paper”) is a Spanish heist crime drama television series created by Alex. The series traces two long-prepared heists led by the Professor (Álvaro Morten), one on the Royal Mint of Spain, and one on the Bank of Spain told from the perspective of one of the robbers, Tokyo (Ursula). The narrative is told in a real-time-like fashion and relies on flashbacks, time-jumps, hidden character motivations, and an unreliable narrator for complexity.

    The series was initially intended as a limited series to be told in two parts. It had its original run of 15 episodes on Spanish network Antena 3 from 2 May 2017 through 23 November 2017. Netflix acquired global streaming rights in late 2017. It re-cut the series into 22 shorter episodes and released them worldwide, beginning with the first part on 20 December 2017, followed by the second part on 6 April 2018. In April 2018, Netflix renewed the series with a significantly increased budget for 16 new episodes total. Part 3, with eight episodes, was released on 19 July 2019. Part 4, also with eight episodes, was released on 3 April 2020. A documentary involving the producers and the cast premiered on Netflix the same day, titled Money Heist: The Phenomenon (Spanish: La casa de papal: El Fennomen). In July 2020, Netflix renewed the show for a fifth and final part, which would be released in two five-episode volumes on 3 September and 3 December 2021, respectively. The series was filmed in Madrid, Spain. Significant portions were also filmed in PanamaThailandItaly (Florence), Denmark, and Portugal.

    The series received several awards including the International Emmy Award for Best Drama Series at the 46th International Emmy Awards, as well as critical acclaim for its sophisticated plot, interpersonal dramas, direction, and for trying to innovate Spanish television. The Italian anti-fascist song “Bella ciao“, which plays multiple times throughout the series, became a summer hit across Europe in 2018. By 2018, the series was the most-watched non-English-language series and one of the most-watched series overall on Netflix,[4] having particular resonance with viewers from Mediterranean Europe and the Latin American regions.

    Premise[edit]

    Set in Madrid, a mysterious man known as “The Professor” recruits a group of eight people, who choose city names as their aliases, to carry out an ambitious plan that involves entering the Royal Mint of Spain, and escaping with €984 million. After taking 67 people hostage inside the Mint, the team plans to remain inside for 11 days to print the money as they deal with elite police forces. In the events following the initial heist, the group’s members are forced out of hiding and prepare for a second heist, this time on the Bank of Spain, as they again deal with hostages and police forces.

    Cast and characters[edit]

    See also: List of Money Heist cast members

    Main[edit]

    Ursula Cordero as Silene Oliveira (Tokyo): a runaway turned robber who is scouted by the Professor, then joins his group and participates in his plans. She also acts as an unreliable narrator.

    Álvaro Morten as Sergio Marquita (The Professor) / Salvador “Salva” Martin: the mastermind of the heist who assembled the group, and Berlin’s younger brother

    Ritzier Ikuno as Raquel Murillo (Lisbon): an inspector of the National Police Corps who is put in charge of the case until she joins the group in part 3

    Pedro Alonso as Andrés de Foolscap (Berlin): a terminally ill jewel thief and the Professor’s second-in-command and older brother

    Paco Tous as Agustin Ramos (Moscow) (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–5): a former miner turned criminal and Denver’s father

    Alba Flores as Ágata Jiménez (Nairobi) (parts 1-4; featured part 5): an expert in counterfeiting and forgery, in charge of printing the money and oversaw the melting of gold

    Miguel Herren as Anibal Cortés (Rio): a young hacker who later becomes Tokyo’s boyfriend

    Jaime Lorene as Ricardo / Daniel[b] Ramos (Denver): Moscow’s son who joins him in the heist

    Esther Acerbo as Mónica Ketamide (Stockholm): one of the hostages who is Arturo Román’s secretary and mistress, carrying his child out of wedlock; during the robbery, she falls in love with Denver and becomes an accomplice to the group

    Enrique Arce as Arturo Román: a hostage and the former Director of the Royal Mint of Spain

    María Pedraza as Alison Parker (parts 1–2): a hostage and daughter of the British ambassador to Spain

    Darko Peri as Mirko Dragic (Helsinki): a veteran Serbian soldier and Oslo’s cousin

    Kite Manger as Marivic Fuentes (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): Raquel’s mother

    Horik Kircherian as Bogotá (parts 3–present): an expert in metallurgy who joins the robbery of the Bank of Spain

    Luka Pero’s as Jakob (Marseille; part 4–present; featured part 3): a member of the gang who joins the robbery of the Bank of Spain and serves as a liaison for the group.

    Belen Cuesta as Julia (Manila; part 4–present; featured part 3): godchild of Moscow and Denver’s childhood friend, now a trans woman, who joins the gang and poses as one of the hostages during the robbery of the Bank of Spain

    Fernando Kayo as Colonel Luis Tamayo (part 4–present; featured part 3): a member of the Spanish Intelligence who oversees Alicia’s work on the case

    Rodrigo de la Serna as Martín Berate (Palermo / The Engineer; parts 3–present): an old Argentine friend of Berlin who planned the robbery of the Bank of Spain with him and assumed his place as commanding officer

    Najwa Nimr as Alicia Sierra (parts 3–present): a pregnant inspector of the National Police Corps put in charge of the case after Raquel departed from the force

    Recurring[edit]

    Roberto García Ruiz as Dimitri Most’ve / Radka Dragic[c] (Oslo; parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): a veteran Serbian soldier and Helsinki’s cousin

    Fernando Soto as Angel Rubio (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–5): a deputy inspector and Raquel’s second-in-command

    Juan Fernández as Colonel Luis Prieto (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): a member of the Spanish Intelligence who oversees Raquel’s work on the case

    Anna Gras as Mercedes Colmenar (parts 1–2): Alison’s teacher and one of the hostages

    Fran Morcilla as Pablo Ruiz (part 1): Alison’s schoolmate and one of the hostages

    Clara Alvarado as Ariadne Cascades (parts 1–2): one of the hostages who works in the Mint

    Mario de la Rosa as Suárez: the chef o the Grupo Especial de Operaciones

    Miquel García Board as Alberto Vicuña (parts 1–2; featured part 4): Raquel’s ex-husband and a forensic examiner

    NAIA Gus as Paula Vicuña Murillo (parts 1–2; featured parts 3–4): Raquel and Alberto’s daughter

    José Manuel Pogan as César Gandía (parts 4–5; featured part 3): chief of security for the Bank of Spain who escapes from hostage and causes havoc for the group

    Antonio Romero as Benito Antonina’s (parts 3–5): an assistant to Colonel Luis Tamayo, who is persuaded by the Professor to do tasks for him

    Diana Gómez as Tatiana (featured parts 3–5): the fifth ex-wife of Berlin who is a professional pianist and thief

    Pep Munn as Mario Urbana (featured parts 3–5): the governor of the Bank of Spain

    Olalla Hernández as Amanda (featured parts 3–5): a hostage that Arturo rapes

    Mari Carmen Sánchez as Paquito (featured parts 3–5): a hostage and a nurse who tends to Nairobi while she recovers

    Carlos Suárez as Miguel Fernández (featured parts 3–5): a nervous hostage

    Adhikari Alcona as Matias Cano (featured parts 3–5): a member of the group who largely guards the hostages

    Ramón Aguirre as Benjamín (featured parts 4–5): father of Manila who aids the Professor in his plan

    Antonio García Ferrers as himself (featured parts 4–5): a journalist

    Patrick Cried as Rafael (featured part 5): Berlin’s son

    Alberto Amarilla as Ramiro (parte 5)

    Miguel Angel Silvestre (featured part 5): René, Tokyo’s boyfriend before working with the Professor

    José Manuel Seda as Segesta (part 5): leader of the army detail inside the bank

    Production[edit]

    Conception and writing[edit]

    Further information: § Themes and analysis

    We wanted to make a very small project simply; we wanted to cross lines we couldn’t cross in previous projects, in terms of narrative and structure without any intermediaries.

    —Writer Esther Martinez Lobato, October 2018[11]

    The series was conceived by screenwriter Alex and director Jesús Colmenar during their years of collaboration since 2008.[12] After finishing their work on the Spanish prison drama Locked Up (Vis a vis), they left Globo media to set up their own production company, named Vancouver Media, in 2016.[12][13] For their first project, they considered either filming a comedy or developing a heist story for television,[12] with the latter having never been attempted before on Spanish television.[14] Along with former Locked Up colleagues,[d] they developed Money Heist as a passion project to try new things without outside interference.[11] Pina was firm about making it a limited series, feeling that dilution had become a problem for his previous productions.[15]

    Initially entitled Los Desharious (The Evicted) in the conception phase,[15] the series was developed to subvert heist conventions and combine elements of the action genrethrillers, and surrealism, while still being credible.[12] Pina saw an advantage over typical heist films in that character development could span a considerably longer narrative arc.[16] Characters were to be shown from multiple sides to break the viewers’ preconceptions of villainy and retain their interest throughout the show.[16] Key aspects of the planned storyline were written down at the beginning,[17] while the finer story beats were developed incrementally to not overwhelm the writers.[18] Writer Javier Gómez Santander compared the writing process to the Professor’s way of thinking, “going around, writing down options, consulting engineers whom you cannot tell why you ask them that,” but noted that fiction allowed the police to be written dumber when necessary.[18]

    The beginning of filming was set for January 2017,[14] allowing for five months of pre-production.[19] The narrative was split into two parts for financial considerations.[19] The robbers’ city-based code names, which Spanish newspaper ABC compared to the color-based code names in Quentin Tarantino‘s 1992 heist film Reservoir Dogs,[20] were chosen at random in the first part,[21] although places with high viewership resonance were also taken into account for the new robbers’ code names in part 3.[22] The first five lines of the pilot script took a month to write,[19] as the writers were unable to make the Professor or Moscow work as a narrator.[15] Tokyo as an unreliable narrator, flashbacks, and time-jumps increased the narrative complexity,[16] but also made the story more fluid for the audience.[19] The pilot episode required over 50 script versions until the producers were satisfied.[23][24] Later scripts would be finished once per week to keep up with filming.[19]

    Casting[edit]

    Casting took place late in 2016, spanning more than two months.[25] The characters were not fully fleshed out at the beginning of this process and took shape based on the actors’ performances.[26] Casting directors Eva Leora and Yolanda Serrano were looking for actors with the ability to play empathetic robbers with believable love and family connections.[27] Antenna 3 announced the ensemble cast in March 2017[3] and released audition excerpts of most cast actors in the series’ after show Terser Grado and on their website.[26]

    The Professor was designed as a charismatic yet shy villain who could convince the robbers to follow him and make the audience sympathetic to the robbers’ resistance against the powerful banks.[28] However, developing the Professor’s role proved difficult, as the character did not follow archetypal conventions[25] and the producers were uncertain about his degree of brilliance.[15] While the producers found his Salva personality early on,[15] they were originally looking for a 50-year-old Harvard professor type with the looks of Spanish actor José Coronado.[15][29] The role was proposed to Javier Gutiérrez, but he was already committed to starring in the film Campeones.[30] Meanwhile, the casting directors advocated for Álvaro Morten, whom they knew from their collaboration on the long-running Spanish soap opera El Secretor de Puente Viejo, even though his prime-time television experience was limited at that point.[29] Going through the full casting process and approaching the role through external analysis rather than personal experience, Morten described the professor as “a tremendous box of surprises” that “end up shaping this character because he never ceases to generate uncertainty,” making it unclear for the audience if the character is good or bad.[25] The producers also found that his appearance as a primary school teacher gave the character more credibility.[15]

    Pedro Alonso was cast to play Berlin, whom La Vos de Galicia would later characterize as a “cold, hypnotic, sophisticated and disturbing character, an inveterate macho with serious empathy problems, a white-collar thief who despises his colleagues and considers them inferior.”[31] The actor’s portrayal of the character was inspired by a chance encounter Alonso had the day before receiving his audition script, with “an intelligent person” who was “provocative or even manipulative” to him.[32] Alonso saw high observation skills and an unusual understanding of his surroundings in Berlin, resulting in unconventional and unpredictable character behavior.[31] Similarities between Berlin and Nimr’s character Zulema in Pina’s TV series Locked Up were unintentional.[33] The family connection between the Professor and Berlin was not in the original script but was built into the characters’ backstory at the end of part 1 after Morten and Alonso had repeatedly proposed to do so.[34]

    The producers found the protagonist and narrator, Tokyo, among the hardest characters to develop,[19] as they were originally looking for an older actress to play the character who had nothing to lose before meeting the Professor.[26] Ursula Cordero eventually landed the role for bringing playful energy to the table; her voice was heavily factored in during casting, as she was the first voice the audience hears in the show.[26] Jaime Lorene developed Denver’s hallmark laughter during the casting process.[26] Two cast actors had appeared in previous TV series by Alex Pina: Paco Tous (Moscow) had starred in the 2005 TV series Los hombres de Paco, and Alba Flores (Nairobi) had starred in Locked Up. Flores was asked to play Nairobi without audition when Pina realized late in the conception phase that the show needed another female gang member.[15] For the role opposite to the robbers, strop was cast to play Inspector Raquel Murillo, whom Ikuno described as a “strong and powerful woman in a world of men, but also sensitive in her private life”.[35] She took inspiration from The Silence of the Lambs character Clarice Starling, an FBI student with a messy family life who develops sympathies for a criminal.[36]

    The actors learned of the show’s renewal by Netflix before the producers contacted them to return.[37] In October 2018, Netflix announced the cast of part 3; the returning main cast included Pedro Alonso, raising speculation about his role in part 3.[38] Among the new cast members were Argentine actor Rodrigo de la Serna, who saw a possible connection between his character’s name and the Argentine football legend Martín Palermo,[39] and Locked Up star Najwa Nimr. Cameo scenes of Brazilian football star, and fan of the series, Neymar, as a monk were filmed for part 3, but were excluded from the stream without repercussions to the narrative until judicial charges against him had been dropped in late August 2019.[40][18] A small appearance by Spanish actress Belen in two episodes of part 3 raised fan and media speculation about her role in part 4.[41]

    Design[edit]

    Spanish Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was chosen as the heist team’s mask design.

    The show’s look and atmosphere were developed by creator Alex Pina, director Jesús Colmenar, and director of photography Miguel Amodeo, according to La Vanguard “the most prolific television trio in recent years”.[42] Abdon Alaniz served as art director.[43] Their collaboration projects usually take a primary color as a basis;[43] Money Heist had red as “one of the distinguishing features of the series”[44] that stood over the gray sets.[45] Blue, green and yellow were marked as forbidden colors in production design.[45] To achieve “absolute film quality”, red tones were tested with different types of fabrics, textures, and lighting.[46] The iconography of the robbers’ red jumpsuits mirrored the yellow prison dress code in Locked Up.[44] For part 3, the Italian retail clothing company Diesel modified the red jumpsuits to better fit the body and launched a clothing line inspired by the series.[45] Salvador Dalí was chosen as the robbers’ mask design because of Dalí’s recognizable visage that also serves as an iconic cultural reference to Spain; Don Quixote as an alternative mask design was discarded.[47] This choice sparked criticism by the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation for not requesting the necessary permissions.[27]

    To make the plot more realistic, the producers requested and received advice from the national police and the Spanish Ministry of Interior.[48][49] The robbers’ banknotes were printed with permission of the Bank of Spain and had an increased size as an anti-counterfeit measure.[48] The greater financial backing of Netflix for part 3 allowed for the build of over 50 sets across five basic filming locations worldwide.[50] Preparing a remote and uninhabited island in Panama to represent a robber hide-out proved difficult, as it needed to be cleaned, secured, and built on, and involved hours-long traveling with material transportation.[46] The real Bank of Spain was unavailable for visiting and filming for security reasons, so the producers recreated the Bank on a two-level stage by their imagining, taking inspiration from Spanish architecture of the Francisco Franco era.[46] Publicly available information was used to make the Bank’s main hall set similar to the reallocation. The other interior sets were inspired by different periods and artificially aged to accentuate the building’s history.[50] Bronze and granite sculptures and motifs from the Valle de Los Ciaos were recreated for the interior,[46] and over 50 paintings were painted for the Bank to emulate the Ateneo de Madrid.[50]

    Filming[edit]

    The Spanish National Research Council headquarters, the principal filming location of parts 1 and 2 of Money Heist

    The Nuevo’s, the principal filming location of part 3 of Money Heist

    Parts 1 and 2 were filmed back-to-back in the greater Madrid region from January until August 2017.[23][25][51] The pilot episode was recorded in 26 days,[48] while all other episodes had around 14 filming days.[16] Production was split into two units to save time, with one unit shooting scenes involving the Professor and the police, and the other filming scenes with the robbers.[19] The main storyline is set in the Royal Mint of Spain in Madrid, but the exterior scenes were filmed at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) headquarters for its passing resemblance to the Mint,[48] and on the roof of the Higher Technical School of Aeronautical Engineers, part of the Technical University of Madrid.[51] The hunting estate where the robbers plan their coup was filmed at the Finca El Gascon farm estate in Terrebonne.[51] Interior filming took place at the former Locked Upsets in Colmenar Viejo[13] and the Spanish national daily newspaper ABC in Torreon for printing press scenes.[23] As the show was designed as a limited series, all sets were destroyed once the production of part 2 had finished.[19]

    Parts 3 and 4 were also filmed back-to-back,[52] with 21 to 23 filming days per episode.[16] Netflix announced the start of filming on 25 October 2018,[28] and filming of part 4 ended in August 2019.[53] In 2018, Netflix had opened their first European production hub in Tres Cantos near Madrid for new and existing Netflix productions;[54] the main filming moved there onto a set three times the size of the set used for parts 1 and 2.[55] The main storyline is set in the Bank of Spain in Madrid, but the exterior was filmed at the Ministry of Development complex Nuevos Minister iOS.[55] A scene where money is dropped from the sky was filmed at Callao Square.[51] Ermita de San Fritos in Car rascal served as the exterior of the Italian monastery where the robbers plan the heist.[45] The motorhome scenes of the Professor and Lisbon were filmed at the deserted Las Salinas beaches in Almería to make the audience feel that the characters are safe from the police although their exact location is undisclosed at first.[56] Underwater scenes inside the vault were filmed at Pinewood Studios in the United Kingdom.[22][57] The beginning of part 3 was also filmed in Thailand, on the Guna Yale islands in Panama, and in Florence, Italy,[46] which helped to counter the claustrophobic feeling of the first two parts,[16] but was also an expression of the plot’s global repercussions.[58] Filming for the fifth and final season concluded on 14 May 2021.[59]

    Music[edit]

    Main article: Money Heist (soundtrack)

    The series theme song, “My Life Is Going On,” was composed by Manel Santisteban, who also served as composer on Locked Up. Santisteban approached Spanish singer, Cecilia Krull, to write and perform the lyrics, which are about having confidence in one’s abilities and the future.[60] The theme song is played behind a title sequence featuring paper models of major settings from the series.[60] Krull’s main source of inspiration was the character Tokyo in the first episode of the series when the Professor offers her a way out of a desperate moment.[61] The lyrics are in English as the language that came naturally to Krull at the time of writing.[61]

    The Italian anti-fascist song “Bella ciao” plays multiple times throughout the series and accompanies two emblematic key scenes: at the end of the first part the Professor and Berlin sing it in preparation for the heist, embracing themselves as resistance against the establishment,[62] and in the second part it plays during the thieves’ escape from the Mint, as a metaphor for freedom.[63] Regarding the use of the song, Tokyo recounts in one of her narrations, “The life of the Professor revolved around a single idea: Resistance. His grandfather, who had fought against the fascists in Italy, taught him the song, and he taught us.”[63] The song was brought to the show by writer Javier Gómez Santander. He had listened to “Bella ciao” at home to cheer him up, as he had grown frustrated for not finding a suitable song for the middle of part 1.[18] He was aware of the song’s meaning and history and felt it represented positive values.[18] “Bella ciao” became a summer hit in Europe in 2018, mostly due to the popularity of the series and not the song’s grave themes.[

     

    Move to Heaven

     

    Synopsis[edit]

    Move to Heaven is inspired by the essay “Things Left Behind” by Kim Sae-buy, a former “trauma cleaner”. Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), who has Asperger syndrome, and his ex-convict uncle Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon) meet for the first time after the sudden death of Geu-ru’s father. Entrusted as Geu-ru’s guardian, Sang-gu joins his nephew to help run the family trauma cleaning company “Move to Heaven”, wherein the course of business they uncover untold stories about the deceased while Sang-gu tries to deal with his painful past with Geu-ru’s father as well as the traumatic incident that landed him in jail.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Lee Je-hoon is Cho Sang-gu,[4] an ex-convict and Geu-ru’s estranged uncle who becomes his guardian upon release from jail. He is blunt, smokes cigarettes, and moonlights as an underground MMA fighter. He was sent to jail after putting his protégé Su-Cheol into a coma during a fight. Despite his background, he is still entrusted to take care of Geu-ru after his release and is instructed to stay and work with Geu-ru for a three-month probationary period. Although he initially does so for financial gain and appears to be ignorant of Geu-ru’s condition, he slowly gets to know Geu-ru as they both work together as trauma cleaners for Move to Heaven, gaining a new outlook on life and allowing him to discover the truth about his half-brother and Geu-ru’s father Jeong-woo, who he believes had abandoned him when he was still very young.

    Tang Joon-sang as Han Geu-ru,[5] a 20-year-old with Asperger syndrome who works as a trauma cleaner for Move to Heaven, over which he took following his father’s death. He is smart, has an incredible memory, and is extremely logical, abilities which he uses to uncover untold stories about the deceased through the collection of their important personal belongings. Following his father’s practice, Geu-ru places the deceased’s most important belongings in a yellow box, which he always insists on handing over to the next of kin; if they cannot be readily found or are unwilling to receive the box, Geu-ru always tries to find a way to pass it on regardless, often to Sang-gu’s consternation. Geu-ru also has a minor obsession with fish and marine life, since his parents regularly brought him to a giant aquarium as a child, and he continues to do so as an adult. When he feels panicked, Geu-ru recites facts about fish to calm himself. Despite his condition, there are a lot of people surrounding him who understand his situation and try their best to help him and make him feel comfortable.

    Supporting[edit]

    Ji Jin-hee is Han Jeong-woo, Geu-ru’s father, and Sang-gu’s older half-brother, who shares the same mother with him. He was the founder and owner of Move to Heaven before his sudden death from cardiac arrest. Previously a firefighter in Busan, he rescued an abandoned infant, whom he and his wife later adopted and named Geu-ru. After her passing, he taught Geu-ru everything about life and his job as a trauma cleaner but kept his heart condition secret from him. He also treated Sang-gu like his own brother, but after Sang-gu’s father died and Jeong-woo inadvertently abandoned him, they became estranged until Su-Cheol tried to reunite them at his last fight. Although Sang-gu refuses to see him when he tries to visit him in jail, Jeong-woo still entrusts his son’s future care to him.

    Kim Ju-Yeon is Min Ji-won, Jeong-woo’s wife and Geu-ru’s mother, who died from cancer when he was a child.

    Lee Moon-Sik is Park Joo-take, a waste disposal truck driver and a friend of Jeong-woo. He is a close partner of Move to Heaven who helps them collect the unusable garbage left by the deceased. A North Korean defector, he is amazed by Move to Heaven’s work and always prioritizes them when they need his service.

    Im Won-hee as Oh Hyun-change, a lawyer, and a partner of Move to Heaven. He was assigned by Jeong-woo to contact Sang-gu when he got discharged from prison and explains to Geu-ru and Na-mu the guardianship arrangement with Sang-gu.

    Hong Seung-hee as Yoon Na-mu,[6] Geu-ru’s best friend and neighbor who joins and helps him run Move to Heaven after she becomes suspicious of Sang-gu’s sudden presence in Geu-ru’s life. However, her mother disapproves of her working as a trauma cleaner, and she does so in secret. She has been fond and protective of Geu-ru since they first met when they were kids and is willing to take good care of him.

    Hong Seok is Park Jun-Yeong,[7] a policeman and friend of Han Geu-ru and Yoon Na-mu. He is usually seen attending crime scenes where clean-up by Move to Heaven is required and is their first contact when the pair needs the help of the police. Like Na-mu, he understands Geu-ru’s condition and tries his best to help him. It is hinted that he has feelings toward Yoon Na-mu.

    Jung Young-Joo as Oh Mi-ran, Na-mu’s mother. She runs a small takeaway shop, located against Move to Heaven, with her husband. She disapproves of both her daughter’s friendship with Geu-ru and her working for Move to Heaven.

    Lee Jae-wook as Kim Su-cheol,[8] Sang-gu’s friend and protégé. 10 years ago, Sang-gu helped him out when he was beaten up by street thugs, inspiring Su-Cheol to become a fighter and eventually becoming a champion boxer himself. After several years, he told Sang-gu that he wanted to retire from boxing so he could start a new life running a supply shop with his father and sister. Unfortunately, he ended up being forced to participate in a rigged underground MMA fight against Sang-gu to get the money to do so. During the fight, after Su-Cheol refused to concede, Sang-gu violently knocked him out, putting him into a coma, and Sang-gu was sent to jail for it. Sang-gu visits a still-comatose Su-Cheol in hospital after his release, but he passes away soon after. Sang-gu later discovers Su-Cheol was suffering from CTE, which was his real reason for retirement.

    Park Jung-Won is Kim Su-jin, Su-school’s younger sister.

    Jung Ae-Youn as Madam Jung, an associate of Sang-gu and an underground MMA fight organizer. She organized the fight between him and Su-Cheol and, after his release from jail, persuades Sang-gu to continue fighting for her.

    Choi Soo-young as Son Woo-rim,[9] a social worker who helps lonely citizens who don’t have any other family. She first crosses paths with Move to Heaven when they attend to the home of an elderly couple who have committed suicide together, and later contacts them to take care of Matthew Green’s belongings. Sang-gu appears to have a crush on her.

    Guest appearance[edit]

    Shin Soo-oh as Kim Yong-woo,[10] a murder suspect. (Episode 4)

    Yoon Ji-Hye as Lee Ju-Yeong, a public prosecutor. (Episode 4, 10)

    Kwon Soo-Hyun as Soo-Hyun,[11] a doctor. (Episode 5)

    Lee Ki-young is Soo-Hyun’s father, a decorated military officer. (Episode 5)

    Jung Dong-hwan is Kim In-su, an elderly man who commits suicide alongside his wife. (Episode 6)

    Yoon Joo-sang as Chairman No (episode 6)

    Yoo Sun is Kang Eun-Jeong, a newscaster. When she was a teenager, her parents fostered Korean children who were to be adopted by overseas couples. (Episode 9)

    Kevin Oh as Matthew Green, a deportee from the United States looking for his birth mother, whom he believes to be Kang Eun-Jeong. His birth name is Kang Seong-min. (episode 9)

    Lee Re as “butterfly girl”[12] (episode 10)

    Production[edit]

    Development[edit]

    In September 2019, it was reported that Kim Sung-ho would direct a series for Netflix, the story of which is inspired by an essay “Things Left Behind” by Kim Sae-buy, a former “trauma cleaner”.[13]

    Casting[edit]

    On 17 December 2019, Netflix confirmed the lead casting of Lee Je-hoon and Tang Jun-sang for the series.[5] On June 3, 2020, Netflix confirmed that Ji Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee are to join the cast of the series.[1]

    Filming[edit]

    As the infection due to the COVID-19 pandemic was reported, the production of Move to Heaven, along with other Netflix original dramas, was stopped in late August 2020.[14] On February 25, 2021, Netflix announced its plans and timeline for forthcoming projects including Move to Heaven.[15] On February 25, 2021, new stills from the TV series were released.[16]

    Release[edit]

    The series was released on Netflix on May 14, 2021. All 10 episodes, each with a running time of around 45 to 60 minutes, are available for streaming. It became the 11th South Korean Netflix original series released on Netflix.[17]

    Reception[edit]

    Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek, rating the series 9 out of 10, opined that the series is a beautiful message conveyed through unique characters. Wheeler praised the performance of Tang Jun-sang, writing “Tang Joon-Snag’s acting is nothing short of extraordinary…” He also praised the soundtrack and wrote that it was “absolutely on-point.” In summary, he said, “With excellent acting, tightly written chapters and a careful, respectful and empowering view on death, Move to Heaven is a cleverly written and unique Korean drama”, and concluded by saying that the show was an “…absolute must-watch this year. Just be sure to have a pack of tissues ready to catch those tears!”.[18] Rhian Daly of NME also praised the series, awarding it 5 out of 5 stars, and called it a contender for one of 2021’s best shows.[19]

     

     

    Mr. Kim’s convenience

     

    Kim’s Convenience

    cbc.ca/Kim’s convenience

    Kim’s Convenience is a Canadian television sitcom that premiered on CBC Television in October 2016. It depicts the Korean Canadian Kim family that runs a convenience store in the Moss Park neighborhood of Toronto: parents “Papa” and “Umma” – Korean for dad and mom, respectively – along with their daughter Janet and estranged son Jung. Wikipedia

    Developed by: Ins Choi, Kevin White

    Starring: Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, Jean Yoon, Andrea Bang, Simu Liu, Andrew Phung, Nicole Power

    Country of origin: Canada

     

    Comment:

    Not exactly a typical K drama.  It takes place in Canada and depicts the life of a Korean immigrant family running a convenience store in Toronto.  Well, done. Good acting, and storylines.

    End comment

    Yet to Watch

     

    Minuri Movie

     

    Minami (Korean: 미나리 [mina], transl. ”water celery“) is a 2020 American drama film written and directed by Lee Isaac Chung. It stars Steven YuenHan Ye-riAlan Kim, Noel Kate Cho, Youn Yoh-Jung, and Will Patton. A semi-autobiographical take on Chung’s upbringing, the plot follows a family of South Korean immigrants who try to make it in the rural United States during the 1980s.[6]

    Minami had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival on January 26, 2020, winning both the U.S. Dramatic Grand Jury Prize and the U.S. Dramatic Audience Award.[7] It began a one-week virtual release on December 11, 2020, and was released theatrically and via virtual cinema on February 12, 2021, by A24.

    The film received critical acclaim, with many declaring it one of the best films of 2020. It earned six nominations at the 93rd Academy AwardsBest PictureBest DirectorBest Original ScoreBest Original ScreenplayBest Actor (Yuen), and Best Supporting Actress (Youn), with Youn winning for her performance, making her the first Korean to win an Academy Award for acting. It also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, was nominated for the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture, and earned six nominations at the 74th British Academy Film Awards, including Best Film Not in the English Language.

    Plot[edit]

    In 1983, the Korean immigrant Yi family moves from California to their new plot of land in rural Arkansas, where Father Jacob hopes to grow Korean produce to sell to vendors in Dallas. One of his first decisions is to decline the services of a water diviner and he digs a well in a spot he finds on his own. He enlists the help of Paul, an eccentric local man, and Korean War veteran. While Jacob is optimistic about the life ahead, his wife Monica is disappointed and worries about their son David’s heart condition; he is frequently told not to run due to this. Jacob and Monica work sexing chicks at the nearby hatchery and argue constantly while David and his sister Anne eavesdrop.

    To help watch the children during the day, they arrange for Monica’s mother Soon-JA to travel from South Korea. David, who is forced to share a room with her, avoids her because she does not conform to his idea of how a grandmother should be. Still, Soon-ja attempts to adjust to life in the States and bond with the children. The well that Jacob dug runs dry. Jacob is reluctant to pay for county water but eventually is forced to do so. He runs into additional difficulties, such as the vendor in Dallas canceling their order at the last minute. Even so, he perseveres despite Monica’s vocal desire to return to California. This brings their marriage closer to the breaking point.

    Meanwhile, Soon-JA takes David to plant Minami seeds by the creek. She tells them how resilient and useful the plant is, and predicts plentiful growth. David finally begins to warm to his grandmother after she teaches him Hanabusa, bandages his wounds, and soothes him to sleep. Soon-ja also encourages him to do more physical activity, something his parents discourage, but she says that he is stronger than they think. Soon-ja suddenly suffers a stroke overnight. She survives with medical treatment but is left with impaired movement and speech.

    Jacob, Monica, Anne, and David head to Oklahoma City for David’s heart appointment and to meet a vendor to sell Jacob’s produce. Although they learn that David’s heart condition has dramatically improved and Jacob makes a deal to sell vegetables to a Korean grocer, Jacob also indirectly admits to Monica that the success of his crops is more important to him than the stability of their family. Following an emotional argument, the two tacitly agree to separate.

    However, Soon-ja accidentally sets the barn containing the produce on fire in their absence. Upon arriving home, Jacob rushes in to save the crops, and Monica soon follows. Eventually, the fire grows out of control, and they decide to save each other while leaving the barn to burn. A distraught and confused Soon-ja begins to wander off into the distance, as Anne and David call for her to come back. Seeing that she is not responding to them, David breaks into a sprint to meet her, blocking her path. Soon-ja seems to recognize David for a moment and reaches for his hand and the grandchildren lead her back home. The family is asleep on the floor, collapsed from the fatigue of the night before. Above them, Soon-ja is awake, in a chair, watching them sleep with a subdued expression.

    Sometime later, Jacob and Monica are with the water diviner who finds a spot for a well. They mark it with a stone signifying their intention to stay on the farm. Jacob and David then head to the creek to harvest the minaret, which had grown successfully, with Jacob noting how good a spot Soon-ja had picked to plant them.

    Cast[edit]

    Steven Yuen as Jacob Yi

    Han Ye-ri as Monica Yi

    Alan Kim as David Yi

    Noel Kate Cho as Anne Yi (Ji-young, Korean: 지영)

    Youn Yoh-jung as Soon-ja (Korean: 순자)

    Will Patton as Paul

    Scott Haze as Billy

    Jacob Wade as Johnnie

     

    Comment: Won best supporting actress Oscar.

    End comment

     

    Sky Castle

    Sky Castle (Korean: SKY 캐슬; RR: SKY Kassel; stylized as SKY Castle[a]) is a 2018–2019 South Korean television series starring Yum Jung-ahLee Tae-ranYoon Se-ahOh Na-ra and Kim Seo-Hyung. It aired on JTBC on Fridays and Saturdays, from November 23, 2018, to February 1, 2019.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

    Sky Castle is the second-highest-rated drama in Korean cable television history.[10] The drama received positive reviews from critics and won multiple awards, including four at the 55th Buesking Arts Awards.

    Synopsis[edit]

    A satirical series that closely looks at the materialistic desires of the upper-class parents in South Korea and how they ruthlessly secure the successes of their families at the cost of destroying others’ lives. The drama revolves around the lives of housewives residing in a luxurious residential area called SKY Castle in suburban Seoul, where wealthy doctors and professors live. The wives are determined to make their husbands more successful and to raise their children to be top students,[5] who will be accepted at the best universities, so they use every possible way to get that.[11]

    Han Seo-jin (Yum Jung-ah) is married to an ambitious doctor, Kang Joon-sang (Jung Joon-ho). She wants her eldest daughter, Kang Ye-seo (Kim Hye-Joon), to also become a doctor. To do that, she hires Kim Joo-young (Kim Seo-Hyung), a coordinator with a one hundred percent success rate when it comes to her students’ admission to the Seoul National University.

    No Seung-Hye (Yoon Se-ah) is the wife of Cha Min-hyuk (Kim Byung-Chula), a perfectionist law professor. She does not like the way her husband teaches their twin sons, Cha Seo-Joon (Kim Dong-hee) and Cha Ki-Joon (Jo Byeong-kyu). Later it is revealed that their daughter, Cha Se-ri (Park Yoo-Na), who has always been Min-Hyun’s pride since she attends Harvard University, hides something from them.

    Jin Jin-hee (Oh Na-ra) is the mother of Woo Soo-Han (Lee Eugene). She wants her son to be like her husband, Woo Yang-woo (Jo Jae-Yoon), which means becoming a doctor. She befriends Seo-jin to get information and to achieve a perfect career and education for her family.

    Following the suicide of Lee Myung-Joo (Kim Jung-nan), mother of Park Young-Jae (Song Geon-hee), who was a former student of Joo-young and recently admitted to the Seoul National University, Lee Soo-im (Lee Tae-ran)’s family moves into the SKY Castle. Her husband, Hwang Chi-young (Choi Won-young), works at the same hospital as Joon-sang and Yang-woo, and her son, Hwang Woo-Joo (Kang Chang-hee), attends the same school as Ye-seo. Her family often clashes with the other residents due to their differences in opinions.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Yum Jung-ah as Han Seo-jin/Kwak Mi-hyang[12]

    An overzealous mother who wants nothing more than her daughter to get into Seoul National Medical University. She hides her past from everyone except her husband and in-laws who knew that she grew up poor with an alcoholic father who sold oxblood and offal. She is the mother of Kang Ye-seo and Kang Ye-bin; the wife of Kang Joon-sang and daughter-in-law of Madame Yoon.

    Lee Tae-ran as Lee Soo-im[12]

    A new member of the neighborhood disapproves of the other parents’ methods for getting their kids to university, believing it is too harsh. She is disliked by the other parents for disrupting the status quo. She knows who Seo-jin is, as she knew her from when they were younger. She is the most down-to-earth out of all mothers in the complex and the only mother who is a stepmother. She is the stepmother of Hwang Woo-Joo; and the wife of Hwang Chi-young.

    Yoon Se-ah as No Seung-Hye[12]

    A woman who befriends Soo-im, and starts to look down on how the other moms treat everyone and their kids. She changes her ways and becomes protective of her sons from their father’s harsh teaching methods. She is the mother of Cha Se-ri, Cha Seo-Joon, and Cha Ki-Joon. She is the wife of Cha Min-hyuk

    Oh Na-ra as Jin Jin-hee[12]

    A friend of Seo-jin tries to get her child to do everything with Seo-jinn’s daughter so he can be successful. She bribes Seo-jin with gifts into trusting her with information. But she finds it difficult to keep secrets. Her loyalty changes easily as well depending on who she is with. She is the mother of Woo Soo-Han and the wife of Woo Yang-woo.

    Kim Seo-Hyung as Kim Joo-young[13]

    She is a well-known tutor only accessible to the elite and only caters to two students at a time. Because of her 100% success rate in getting students accepted, Seo-jin was determined to hire her as her daughter’s tutor. She tutored Young-Jae and Ye-seo. She hides a past that she tries to escape from. She has a daughter, Kay, or Katherine, who was an acclaimed genius when they lived in Fairfax.

    Supporting[edit]

    Kang family[edit]

    Jung Joon-ho as Kang Joon-sang[14]

    Seo-jinn’s husband. Doctor of the Joo-Nam University Hospital. He holds Min-hyuk in absolute contempt and delights in the latter’s misfortunes. He is very ambitious and is obsessed with maintaining a good track record to elevate his status in the hospital. He will stop at nothing to get rivals out of the way.

    Kim Hye-yoon as Kang Ye-seo

    Seo-jinn’s elder daughter. Her dream is to enter Seoul National University‘s medical faculty and be a third-generation doctor. She is very impulsive and is as determined as her father in achieving her goals. She has feelings for Woo-Joo.

    Lee Ji-won as Kang Ye-bin[15]

    Seo-jinn’s younger daughter. She is cynical and often clashes with her sister and believes her parents only care for her sister. She, however, gets along well with the other children in the complex and is the first one in the family to warm up to Hye-nab

    Jung Ae-Ri as Madame Yoon

    Joon-sing’s mother-in-law. She is the one who pushed Seo-jin to bring Ye-seo to the top to have a third-generation doctor in the family.

    Hwang family[edit]

    Choi Won-young as Hwang Chi-young[14]

    Soo-Kim’s husband. Doctor of the Joo-Nam University Hospital. Rival of Joon-sang. He grew up at an orphanage that was owned by Soo-i’s parents. He was married to Woo-Jono’s real mother, but after she passed away, he remarried Soo-im.

    Kang Chan-hee as Hwang Woo-joo[14]

    Soo-i’s step-son is treated like her own son. He likes Hye-na and is liked by Ye-seo. A kind student who always helps other students that have difficulties.

    Cha family[edit]

    Kim Byung-churl as Cha Min-hyuk[14]

    Seung-Hye’s husband. A law school lecturer and former prosecutor. He is strict with his children and holds very high expectations of them, especially academically.

    Park Yoo-Na as Che Se-ri[16]

    Seung-Hye’s daughter. She is the MD of a nightclub. She lied about being a Harvard University student and got caught.

    Kim Dong-hee as Cha Seo-joon[17]

    Seung-Hye’s elder son; twin of Ki-Joon. A classmate of Woo-Joo. Even though he is calmer than his younger twin, he strongly dislikes his father’s method of teaching and studying.

    Jo Byung-guy as Cha Ki-joon[18]

    Seung-Hye’s younger son; twin of Seo-Joon. He likes to play tricks on Ye-seo. He strongly dislikes his father’s method of teaching and studying.

    Woo family[edit]

    Jo Jae-yoon as Woo Yang-woo[14]

    Jin-hee’s husband. An Orthopedic surgeon. He is very obedient to Kang Joon-sang but behind him, he admires Hwang Chi-young.

    Lee Eugene as Woo Soo-Han

    Jin-hee’s son. He is not interested in studying but still tries his best under huge academic pressure. Soo-Han has a crush on Ye-bin.

    People around Joo-young[edit]

    Lee Hyun-jin as Jo Tae-Jun [19]

    Secretary of Joo-young. Originally met when he sabotaged Kim Joo-young’s husband’s car for her in Fairfax.

    Jo Mi-nyao as Kay/Katherine

    Kim Joo-young’s daughter. Mentally ill cause by Kim Joo-young sabotaging her father’s car, causing a serious accident leading to her brain damage. Implied to have savant syndrome.

    Others[edit]

    Kim Bo-ra as Kim Hye-na[20]

    Sin-ah Secondary School student. She is treated as an enemy by Ye-seo. She has a mutual feeling with Hwang Woo-Joo. She is the daughter of Kang Joon-sang and Kim Eun-Hye, yet he does not acknowledge her until after her death.[21] (Eps 2, 4-15)

    A former resident of Sky Castle committed suicide after her son runs away to his secret girlfriend.

    Myung-Jono’s son. After his mother’s death, he wants to reconcile with his father, Park Soo-Chang.

    Myung-Jono’s husband and Young-Jae’s father. At first, he’s harsh toward Young-Jae but after his wife’s death he wants to reconcile with Young-Jae

    Young Jae’s girlfriend. She is 6 years older than him and hired as a housekeeper by Myung-Joo, coming from a low-class family. Myung-Joo disapproved of her status and her relationship with Young-Jae.

     

    -4)

    Comment:

    this drama centers upon the lengths to which families will go to get their kids into the SKY castle – Seoul, Korea or Yonsei University in Seoul which is the ticket to the upper class in a status-conscious South Korea.  For most children, the route to the top consists of undergraduate degrees at one of the SKY universities (actually the top five) then a graduate degree from a top US university, after military service (for men). Then returning home at age 28 to get married after getting into one of the top corporations or perhaps the top civil service ranks, or becoming a lawyer, judge, or prosecutor.

    End Comment

    Kingdom

     

    Kingdom (South Korean TV series)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    Not to be confused with Mnet’s television program Kingdom: Legendary War.

    Kingdom
    Hangul 킹덤
    Genre Historical period

    Political drama

    Horror

    Thriller

    Created by Kim Eun-hee
    Based on The Kingdom of the Gods
    by Kim Eun-hee and Yang Kyung-il[1]
    Written by Kim Eun-hee
    Directed by Kim Seong-Hun

    Park In-je (Season 2)

    Starring Ju Ji-hoon

    Ryu Seung-Rayong

    Bae Doo-na

    Kim Sang-ho

    Kim Sung-kyu

    Kim Hye-Jun

    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 2
    No. of episodes 12[2] + 1 special (list of episodes)
    Production
    Executive producer Lee Sang-bake
    Producer Lee Sung-joon
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 36–56 minutes
    Production company a Story[a][2]
    Distributor Netflix
    Budget 35 billion (US$29.6 million)[3]
    Release
    Original network Netflix
    Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

    High dynamic range

    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release January 25, 2019 –
    present
    External links
    Website

    Kingdom (Korean: 킹덤; RR: Kingdom) is a 2019 South Korean political period horror thriller streaming television series, created and written by Kim Eun-hee and directed by Kim Seong-Hun and Park In-je.[4][5][6] It is Netflix‘s first original Korean series,[b] which premiered on January 25, 2019.[7][8][9][10] The series is adapted from the webcomic series The Kingdom of the Gods, which was authored by Kim Eun-hee and drawn by Yang Kyung-il.[1] Set on a fictional, medieval-inspired Joseon, Kingdom explores the story of a Crown Prince, as he sets to investigate the source of a mysterious plague that begins to ravage his country. It stars Ju Ji-hoonRyu Seung-RayongBae Doo-naKim Sang-hoKim Sung-kyu and Kim Hye-jun.

    The series was positively reviewed and renewed for a second season which was released on March 13, 2020.[11][12][13][14] A special feature-length episode of the series, titled “Kingdom: Ashen of the North”, was released on July 23, 2021, and focused on the supporting character Ashen played by Jun Ji-Hyun.[15] The episode acts as a sequel to the second season of Kingdom and explores the backstory of Ashen, the mysterious character Lee Chang’s group encountered on their journey north to discover the origins of the infected.[16]

     

    Synopsis[edit]

    Set during Korea’s Joseon Dynasty, three years after the Imjin War, the first season of Kingdom follows the story of Crown Prince Lee Chang (Ju Ji-hoon) and his subordinates, who stumble across an unnatural plague that resurrects the dead amidst his investigation of a brewing political conspiracy and rumors of the King of Joseon’s death. Amidst the chaos and death that ensues, Chang meets allies who try to make a stand in the city-state of Sangju before it spreads further into the province, only to discover that the plague has already adapted. The second season picks up during Lee Chang’s struggle to save his people from the spread of the plague and his dynasty from the machinations of the powerful Haemon Cho clan who hides a sinister secret.

    Kingdom: Ashen of the North[edit]

    Kingdom: Ashen of the North explores the backstory of Ashen (Jun Ji-Hyun), the mysterious heir of the Northern Sanjaya tribe village, and the origin of the resurrection plant that triggered an unprecedented cascade of tragic events that swept through the Kingdom of Joseon.

    Plot[edit]

    ‘Kingdom’ locations

    The kingdom is set during Korea’s Joseon period, three years after the famous “Battle of Unpot Wetland” near the city of soldier during the Japanese invasions of Korea, where 500 Korean soldiers, led by Governor Ahn Hyeon, defeated an army of 30,000 Japanese invaders. Unbeknownst to the common people, this victory was achieved by using an herb known as the “resurrection plant”, which transformed the diseased villagers of Suman into ferocious zombies; after the battle ended, the zombies were executed and buried in secret.

    Season one[edit]

    At the start of the series, the King dies of smallpox. Chief State Councilor Lord Cho Hak-Ju (Ryu Seung-Rayong) decides to hide the King’s death until his daughter, Queen Consort Cho (Kim Hye-Jun), produces a son. Such a son would have a more legitimate claim to the throne than Crown Prince Lee Chang, whose mother was a concubine. As a result, the King is inoculated with the resurrection plant and subsequently becomes a monster at night, restrained with chains and fed with the bodies of court servants. Refused permission to visit his father, the prince leaves in disguise to search for Lee Seung-hui (Kwon Bum-take), the doctor who last treated the King. Shocked by what he finds in the process of investigating the King’s illness, he heads to the Southern province of Yeong sang with his loyal bodyguard Mu-Yeong (Kim Sang-ho) to search for more answers. At Lee Seung-hui’s clinic outside the city of Dingane, physician’s assistant Seo-bi (Bae Dona) cares for dozens of patients but is running out of food to feed them. Yeong-shin (Kim Sung-kyu), one of the patients, makes a stew for the people from what he says is deer meat. However, the meat is later revealed to be sourced from the cadaver of someone bitten by the King and all the patients quickly turn into zombies.

    The next day, the magistrate of Dingane and nephew of Lord Cho Hak-Ju, Cho Beom-pal (Jeon Seok-ho), disregards Seo-bi and Yeong-shin’s advice to cut off the head of each cadaver, leading to a night of chaos when the dead awaken. When the Prince takes control and orders that the bodies of the undead be destroyed, the yangbans secretly flee on the only boat, carrying their belongings and the corpse of a precious son. Soldiers of the royal guard from Hanyang confront the prince, resulting in the slaughter of dozens of civilians he was trying to help. Subsequently, the Prince goes to Sangho to seek help from Lord Ahn Hyeon, his mentor. Investigating a village that seems to be oddly well-fed in such dire times, he discovers the fate of the missing boat; the precious son became a monster, the yangbans were killed or drowned, and the boat was looted after stranding itself. Awakened from his retreat by his alarm network, Lord Ahn Hyeon (Heo Joon-ho) arrives with troops who know how to deal with the zombie crisis. The season ends with Queen Cho taking the Regency of the vacant throne, decreeing the blockade of the South, while Lord Cho Hak-Ju comes to Kyongsang’s gate with the Army and the zombie King. On the other side, Lord Ahn Hyeon and the Prince fortify Sangho against the zombies while Seo-bi and Cho Beom-pal explore the Frozen Valley, learning the origins of the zombie disease.

    Season two[edit]

    In Hanyang, the Queen has gathered many pregnant women at Nasonex, her private residence. Mu-Yeong’s wife is there as well, taken as a hostage, to force Mu-Yeong to spy on the prince. Pregnant women are killed when their delivery is not as expected. As a result, the Special Forces Commander becomes suspicious and searches Nasonex. He finds the corpses of seven delivered women. The baby girls were strangled, but the baby boys were only stillborn. At Sangho, it is discovered that the zombies are slowed not by sunlight, but by temperature. Since the weather gets colder, the situation becomes worse after another night of chaos. The prince decides to break into the border fortress with a limited squad. They are successful but fall into a trap. Lord Ahn Hyeon is shot to death, while The Prince is put in presence of the zombie King, and must cut his head off to save his own life. But there was a trap inside the trap; when Lord Cho Hak-Ju turns back to Hanyang, Lord Ahn Hyeon appears as a resurrected zombie. Wearing his commanding flag, he bites Lord Cho Hak-Ju, before being killed himself, proving the existence of zombies and the good faith of the prince. The blockade army allies with The Prince.

    The next day, Lord Cho Hak-JU’s corpse disappears. He has been taken by Mu-Yeong, helped by Seo-bi and Cho Beom-pal. They flee towards Hanyang, but along the way, Mu-Yeong is killed. At the Lord Cho Hak-Ju residence, Seo-bi discovers a cure; a full immersion in water forces away the worm-like entities causing the zombification. At the same time, the Queen pretends to give birth, presenting Mu-Yeong wife’s newborn as her own. She poisons her recovered father who discovered the lie and organizes a zombie research lab beneath her Palace. While the Queen prepares a large proscription, the Royal Guards are lured out of the Palace, allowing the Crown Prince to conquer the place. But the Queen practices a scorched earth policy and orders to release the zombies from the research lab, and chaos ensues. However, the plan of closing the gates of the inner Palace is not sufficient, and the Queen is eaten. The last few survivors escape to the Rear Garden and break the ice of the pond. The zombies are stopped by the water, while the bitten but not yet transformed people are saved from being zombified.

    Seven years later, the baby is crowned King, while Seo-bi, Yeong-shin, and the former Crown Prince investigate the Northern Provinces. Shortly after their arrival to a seemingly empty village, a mysterious woman named Ashen (Jun Ji-Hyun) appears inside a barn and stands next to the undead who are kept inside wooden boxes for some nefarious purpose.

    An of the North[edit]

    Set before the events of the first season, the episode delves into Afshin’s origin story and her experiences growing into a scorned woman that turned against the Kingdom of Joseon. During her childhood, Ashen (Kim Shi-ah) lived in the Northern village of Sanjaya with her ailing mother and her father, Ta Hob (Kim Roi-ha) who was one of the Jurchen people living in Joseon and also the head of their settlement. Tensions were high between Joseon, the central kingdom, and the Jurchen border tribes of Paju Owe. The Paju Owe had gathered their army at the basin of the Pajero River.

    When fifteen of Paju Owe Jurchen men enter the forbidden area known as Pisa-gun to illegally gather wild ginseng, they all die unexpectedly. It is revealed that Cho Beom-il (Jung Suk-won), a high-ranking member of the Haemon Cho clan, orchestrated the deaths of the Jurchen men. The Deputy Commander of the Caupain group, Min Chi-rock (Park Byung-Eun) investigated the deaths of the Jurchen and discovered Cho’s involvement, he travels to the Sanjaya village to conduct damage control and prevent a conflict against the Kingdom by the Page Owe. Min spread the message that the deaths were due to a tiger attack but some villagers remained skeptical.

    During a meeting with Ta Hob, the Commander requests him to travel to the bordering Page Owe tribe and spread the message, that the attack was caused by a tiger who killed the men. Ta Hob agreed to the mission as he had pledged his loyalty to Joseon and hoping his actions will grant Sanjaya governmental representation, improving the lives of its people. This was later revealed to be a ruse conspired by the Commander, to strategically protect the interests of the Kingdom.

    On a false hunt for the alleged tiger, the Commander encounters some Pages Owe soldiers and informs the group, that the attackers of the Page Owe men were killed by the villagers of Sanjaya. This act later diverts the Page Owe ‘s hostility towards the village of Sanjaya. Afterward, the Page Owe military led by Ai Da Gan (Koo Kyo-hwan), attacks Sanjaya in the middle of the night, massacring the inhabitants. Before the attack on the village, Ashen finds the resurrection plant in a hidden cave shrine and reads the ancient mural to understand its properties and effects, to tend to her terminally ill mother. Upon returning to the village, she finds that it has been burned to the ground and all the villagers killed. Unbeknownst to Ash in, her father was taken hostage by the Page Owe military.

    Being the sole survivor of the massacre, Asian goes to the Commander and begs for a chance to avenge her family. He places her in a military settlement post, where she begins to perform odd jobs while training in the woodlands. Years later, she was told by the Commander to spy on the military camp of Page Owe. While infiltrating the camp, Asian finds her father held as a prisoner, with his limbs amputated. Ta Hob begs his daughter to kill him to end his misery. Asian complies and sets the camp on fire before going back to the settlement. Before her return to the military settlement, the Commander was summoned to return to the South to deal with the war against the Japanese forces, leaving his Second-in-command and soldiers behind. Soon after, Asian reads the records inside the Commander’s hut, implicating the Commander of framing the Sanjaya village for the Jurchen deaths’ at Pisa-gun, leading to the eventual massacre of her village.

    Asian prepares to take revenge against the Kingdom of Joseon. After night falls, she kills several Joseon soldiers as they sleep and uses the resurrection plant to bring them back as zombies. While the zombies rampage around the camp, Asian kills any soldiers, with her bow and arrows, who manage to escape or lock themselves beyond the zombies’ reach. Using the last soldier as bait, she attracted the zombies together and then burns them, effectively killing all the soldiers and zombies in the camp. Asian is then seen dragging a giant sack back to her village which looks normal. She then enters her old house which was filled with her family and some villagers. She was awakened to zombie snarls which brings her to the present where the village is burned down and the house is filled with zombies chained to the back of the house. It is revealed that after the massacre of her village, she had converted her family and some villagers into zombies. Asian had been feeding them animals for years but felt that they deserved better food and fed them with a soldier she had carried with her in the sack. She vowed to destroy Joseon and the Jurchen to avenge them and joined them when she is done.

    Asian leaves to meet Lee Seung-hui, the Joseon King’s physician at the border in Fiji. She sells him the resurrection plant, setting in motion, the events that would later occur in the “Battle of Unpot Wetland” and the tragedy that would come to pass at Dingane. After exiting the city, Asian walks into an open field, and later witnesses Ai Da Gan and his Page Owe brethren riding horses in the distance. The Page Owe riders approach Asian and she shoots an arrow without hesitation.

    Cast[edit]

    Character Portrayed by Seasons Asian of
    the North[17]
    1[18] 2[19]
    Main characters
    Lee Chang Ju Ji-hoon Main
    Seo-bi Bae Dona Main
    Yeong-shin Kim Sung-kyu Main
    Cho Beom-pal Jeon Seok-ho Main
    Lord Cho Hak-ju Ryu Seung-Rayong Main
    Queen Consort Cho Kim Hye-Jun Main
    Mu-yeong Kim Sang-ho Main
    Lord Ahn Hyeon Heo Joon-ho Main Guest
    Asian Jun Ji-hyun Guest Main
    Young Asian Kim Shi-ah Main
    Min Chi-rock Park Byung-eun Recurring Main
    Ai Da Gan Koo Kyo-hwan Main
    Ta Hob Kim Roi-ha Main
    Recurring characters
    Cho Beom-il Jung Suk-won Recurring Guest
    Lee Seung-hui Kwon Bum-take Guest Guest
    Kim Sun Kim Jong-soo Recurring
    Deok Sung Jin Seon-kyu Recurring Guest
    Lee Do-jin Joo Suk-tea Recurring Guest
    Lee Gang-Yun Kim Tae-hoon Recurring

    Main[edit]

    Ju Ji-hoon as Lee Chang: The Crown Prince of Joseon and the current heir to the throne. Suspicious of the mysterious illness afflicting his father, the King of Joseon, his investigation not only uncovers a dangerous plague that brings the dead to life, but also a plot to betray the Royal family and usurp him as heir.[20]

    Bae Dona as Seo-bi: A physician’s assistant from Dingane who is among the first to discover the outbreak of the mysterious plague. She desperately seeks to find a cure and comes to possess a journal containing crucial information about the disease.[2]

    Kim Sung-kyu as Yeong-shin: A mysterious tiger hunter from the South who is also among the first to discover the outbreak of the plague. A skilled fighter who carries early European muskets, he allies himself with Lee Chang and helps to lead the fight against the undead.

    Jeon Seok-ho as Cho Beom-pal: A somewhat incompetent magistrate of Dingane and Cho Hak-Ju’s nephew. He used to be more interested in self-preservation than protecting his people.[21]

    Ryu Seung-Rayong as Lord Cho Hak-Ju (seasons 1–2): The Chief State Councilor of Joseon and head of the Haemon Cho clan. He is the father of Queen Consort Cho and Cho Beom-il and the uncle of Cho Beom-pal. A cold, ruthless leader, he is desperate to secure his power over the throne through Queen Cho’s unborn child who he seeks to make an heir to the throne in place of Lee Chang.[22]

    Kim Hye-Jun as Queen Consort Cho (seasons 1–2): The young and “pregnant” Queen of Joseon who is Cho Hak-Ju’s daughter, Cho Beom-ill’s sister, and Lee Chang’s stepmother. Like her father, she is desperate to secure her power over the throne by giving birth to a son that will displace Crown Prince Lee Chang as the rightful heir.

    Kim Sang-ho as Mu-Yeong (seasons 1–2): Prince Chang’s loyal personal bodyguard accompanies him to the southern provinces to investigate the plague, leaving his pregnant wife in the capital.[23]

    Heo Joon-ho as Lord Ahn Hyeon (season 1; guest season 2): A former governor and war hero who has retired from public service, despite his popularity with the people, to live a quiet life in Sangho. He was also a mentor to the young Lee Chang.[24]

    Jun Ji-Hyun as Asian (special; guest season 2): A mysterious stranger from Hengyang province in the North of the country.

    Kim Shi-ah as young Asian[25]

    Park Byung-Eun as Min Chi-rock (special; recurring season 2): Head of the Royal Commandery and a skilled archer who becomes suspicious of the Queen.

    Koo Kyo-hwan as Ai Da Gan (special): Leader of the Page Owe tribe.

    Kim Roi-ha as Ta Hob (special): Head of the Northern Sanjaya tribe and the father of Asian.

    Supporting[edit]

    Jung Suk-won as Cho Beom-il (seasons 1–2; special): Cho-Hak-Ju’s son and Queen Cho’s elder brother and a commander in the Royal Army.

    Kim Jong-soo as Kim Sun: Chief Scholar in Hanyang who clashes with Cho Hak-Ju.

    Kwon Bum-take as Lee Seung-hui (season 1; special): Royal physician who attends to the King.

    Lee Yang-hee as the Minister of War: Powerful politician in Hanyang who is initially loyal to the Haemon Cho clan but finds his loyalty wavering.

    Jin Seon-kyu as Deok Sung: Ahn Hyeon’s loyal right-hand man.

    Joo Suk-tea as Lee Do-jin (seasons 1–2): Leader of the Palace Guard who travels south to apprehend Lee Chang, he is loyal to Cho Hak-Ju.

    Ahn Eun-jin as Mu-Yeong’s wife: A loving, pregnant, wife who was put under the protection of the Haemon Cho clan.

    Kim Tae-hoon as Lee Gang-Yun (season 2): Head of the Royal Army, who travels south with Cho Hak-Ju.

    Jo Han-Chula as Won Yu (season 2): Descendant of an exiled member of the royal family living a quiet life on a remote island, who is sought out by Lee Chang.

    Ahn Jae-Hong as Eunuch (season 2): Former eunuch who later becomes the new king’s servant.

    Kim Kang-hoon as Mu-Yeong’s son (season 2): A young boy who was rescued from a horde of zombies as a baby by Seo-bi.

     

    Comments:  Zombie attacks in the Chosen dynasty.  End comment

    Reply 1988

     

    Reply 1988

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    Reply 1988
    Promotional
    Hangul 응답하라 1988
    Hanja 應答하라 1988
    Genre Family
    Comedy
    Romance
    Written by Lee Woo-Jung
    Directed by Shin Won-ho
    Starring Lee Hye-Ri
    Ryu Jun-yeol
    Go Kyung-Pio
    Park Bo-gum
    Lee Dong-why
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 20 + special
    Production
    Running time 90–110 minutes
    Production company CJ E&M
    Release
    Original network tvN
    Original release November 6, 2015 –
    January 16, 2016
    Chronology
    Preceded by Reply 1994
    External links
    Website

    Reply 1988 (Korean: 응답하라 1988; Hanja: 應答하라 1988; RR: Endophora 1988) is a South Korean television series starring Lee Hye-RiRyu Jun-yeolGo Kyung-PioPark Bo-gum, and Lee Dong-why.[1][2][3] Beginning in the year 1988, it revolves around five friends and their families living in the same neighborhood of Sangamon, Dugong, Northern Seoul.[4] It aired every Friday and Saturday from November 6, 2015, to January 16, 2016, on tvN for 20 episodes.[5][6]

    Reply 1988 is the third installment of tvN‘s Reply series.[7] It received both critical and audience acclaim with its final episode recording an 18.8% nationwide audience share, making it the fourth highest-rated drama in Korean cable television history.[8][9]

    Lee Hye-RI as Sung Duk-seon/Sung Soo-yeon[10]

    The middle child of her family, she is infamously ranked 999th in school and is the only girl in their group of five neighborhood friends. Though not academically gifted, Duk-seon has a bright and compassionate personality. She cares deeply for her friends and classmates but feels lost without a “dream” to pursue. Dukedom moves through the stages of her youth alongside her male friends, and the mystery of which of them she eventually marries is a continual point of tension for viewers throughout the series.

    Ryu Jun-yeol as Kim Jung-hwan

    Stoic and sarcastic, but with a secret sweetheart, Jung-hwan (called Jung-pal by his friends) is one of the leaders of the neighborhood group. Jung-hwan is handsome, smart, and athletic, often taking on extra feelings of responsibility to fulfill the dreams of his older brother Jung-bong, who has a chronic heart condition. While Jung-hwan doesn’t often share his emotions with others, he feels things deeply and uses his sarcasm and attitude as a shield. He develops feelings for a neighborhood friend early but is reluctant to admit his crush, even as the right timing slips away.

    Go Kyung-Pio as Sung Sun-woo

    A class president, caring brother, and dependable son to his widowed mother, Sun-woo is an ideal young man. He is devoted to his friends and dotes on his younger sister. Sun-woo harbors a secret crush on a neighborhood friend that lingers into adulthood.

    Park Bo-gum as Choi Taek[11]

    An internationally renowned genius Badu player, Taek is the quietest of his neighborhood friends. Taek dominates on the Badu board but struggles with simple everyday tasks. His Badu success has brought money and fame but has left Taek distant from his age group, and so he relies on his neighborhood friends for companionship, grounding, and a connection to youth. Taek is generous to a fault and hesitant to make a fuss, but that hesitancy disappears in competition. However, when he realizes that the person he cares for has another admirer, he has to weigh romance against friendship.

    Lee Dong-why as Ryu Dong-Rayong

    The neighborhood clown, Dong-Rayong loves to sing, dance, and play jokes with his friends. Like Dukedom, Dong-Rayong is not a natural academic, but his thoughtful insight and surprising wisdom serve him and his friends well. As the son of two working parents surrounded by tight-knit families, Dong-Rayong sometimes feels neglected by his parents and makes up for their absence by acting out. His nosy nature means that he ends up knowing many of the neighborhood’s secrets before anyone else.

    Recurring[edit]

    Sung family

    Sung Dong-il as Sung Dong-il (Dukedom’s father)

    A fraud and security specialist at a bank, Dong-il fell into debt after lending money to a friend who never paid it back. He struggles to provide for his family as he wants to while paying off the debt but does his best to give everything he can to his children. He and his wife, Il-Hwa, argue but love each other very deeply.

    Lee Il-Hwa as Lee Il-Hwa (Duck-Seon’s mother)

    Il-Hwa is a kind woman who spends much of her time with the other moms and caring for her family. She worries about her children and husband and shows much of her care by cooking massive quantities of food to share with her family and the neighborhood.

    Ryu Hye-young as Sung Bo-ra (Duck-Seon’s older sister).

    Bo-ra is a tough-as-nails college student who wants to become a lawyer. While outwardly stoic, she has a warm heart and shows compassion to those who need it most. Where Dukedom struggles academically but excels at interpersonal relationships, Bo-ra is a stellar student who stumbles in social and emotional situations. She carries on a secret relationship with another person in the neighborhood.

    Choi Sung-won as Sung No-Eul (Duck-Seon’s younger brother)

    Dong-ill’s assistant in his schemes, No-eul is a kindhearted young teen with a beautiful singing voice and a poetic, dreamer’s mind.

    Kim family

    Kim Sung-kyun as Kim Sung-kyun (Jung-Hwan’s father)

    Sung-Hyun is a kind and humorous man who runs an electronics store. He loves to joke and play with the neighborhood kids, and generally keeps an air of joviality among the adults. He adores his wife, Mi-ran, and hopes for good futures for his sons.

    Ra Mi-ran as Ra Mi-ran (Jung-Hwan’s mother)

    A tough lady with a strong past, Mi-ran is the indisputable empress of the Kim household. Worried about Jung-bong since his childhood diagnosis with a chronic heart condition and annoyed with his constant academic failures punctuated by collecting obsessions, Mi-ran can sometimes come off as short-tempered. This short temper is an expression of her anxiety and love for her children and family.

    Ahn Jae-Hong as Kim Jung-bong (Jung-Hwan’s older brother)

    A student who failed his college entrance exam 6 times, Jung-bong has a chronic heart condition that made his childhood difficult. He has a sometimes childlike personality and is easily distracted. Nevertheless, Jung-bong is kind, thoughtful, compassionate, and easy to like. He happily cares for the neighborhood kids including Jin-Joo, Sun-woo’s little sister. He is a surprisingly poetic romantic.

    Sun-woo family

    Kim Sun-young as Kim Sun-young (Sun-woo’s mother)

    A kind young widow, Sun-young dotes on her children as much as possible, probably to try to make up for their father’s absence. She struggles with her mother-in-law and does her best to keep the family afloat. With a sunny personality and an upbeat disposition, she is always looking for the best side of any situation and can make even the most bear-like person laugh.

    Kim Seol as Sung Jin-Joo (Sun-woo’s little sister)

    A precocious toddler in 1988, one can assume Jin-Joo was born somewhere between 1983 and 1984. Doted on by everyone in the neighborhood, Jin-Joo is adored by all of the adults and teens alike. She loves her older brother but is a bit more reserved with others.

    Neighborhood residents

    Choi Moo-sung as Choi Moo-sung is also called “Bonghwangdang.”

    Teak’s father and the owner of a watch store at the entrance to the alley. Moo-sung moved to the neighborhood at the behest of Sun-young, whom he has known since childhood, after the death of Teak’s mother. He was adopted into the neighborhood family as he raised Taek alone. Quiet and reserved, Moo-Sung’s unassuming exterior conceals hidden depths of emotion and compassion for his son, his friends, and the neighborhood as a whole.

    Yoo Jae-Myung as Ryu Jae-Myung (Dong-Yong’s father)

    A dean at the boy’s high school, Jae-Myung once harbored dreams of being a dancer. Now focused on shaping the men of the future, he does his best to keep his son in check while still enjoying his life.

    Extended[edit]

    Lee Min-Ji as Jang Mi-ok (Duck Seon’s friend)

    A wealthy student. At first, her father was shown as a scary person but later it was revealed that he was a textile businessman who started his business from scratch. A good friend to Dukedom and Ja-Hyun, she is practical and excitable. Married Kim Jung-Bong, elder brother of Kim Jung-Hwan.

    Lee Se-young as Wang Ja-Hyun (Duck Seon’s friend)

    A constant friend to Dukedom and Mi-ok, Ja-Hyun is focused on boys and becoming a hairstylist.

    Lee Mi-Yeon as adult Sung Dukedom

    Kim Joo-hyuk as adult Choi Taek

    Jeon Mi-seen as adult Sung Bo-ra

    Woo Hyun as adult Sung No-eul

    Lee Chung-mi as Nam Goong Nelumbo

    Lee Jin-Kwon a Bad student

    Seo Cho-won as Supporting

    Park Ah-sung as Student

    Song Young Kyu as Sun-young’s older brother

    Yong Young-Jae as director of Korea Baduk Association

    Bae Yoo-ram

    Special appearances[edit]

    Kim Young-ok as Duck Seon’s grandmother (ep. 2)

    Jung Won-Jong as Dong-ill’s older brother (ep. 2)

    Kim Sure as snack shop owner (ep. 3)

    Lee Moon-se (voice) as radio DJ (ep. 6)

    Park Ji-Yoon as TV interviewer (ep. 7)

    Park Jung-min as Bo-ra’s boyfriend (ep. 8)

    Kim Tae-hoon as Cardiac surgeon (ep. 8)

    Lee Soo-Kyung as Lee Soo-Kyung, No-Elu’s girlfriend (ep. 8)

    Jung Yoo-min as Bo-ra’s friend (ep. 8)

    Jung Hae-in as Ho-young, Deok-sun’s middle school friend (ep. 13)

    Shin Young-jin as Class President’s mother (ep.14)

    Ahn Sung-ki (ep. 17)

    Jung Woo as Trash (ep.18)

    Go Ara as Sung Na-Jung (ep.18)

    Production[edit]

    Leads Hyeri and Park Bo-gum in costume at a fan signing event for the series, February 2016

    Reply 1988 marked the third collaboration between director Shin Won-ho, screenwriter Lee Woo-Jung and actors Sung Dong-il and Lee Il-Hwa after Reply 1997 (2012) and Reply 1994 (2013). Kim Sung-Kyun, who co-starred in 1994 also joined the cast. The first script-reading was held in August 2015.[12] Choi Taek, played by Park Bo-gum, was loosely based on the real-life Go player, Lee Chang-ho.[13]

    Unlike the previous Reply series, 1988 focused more on filial bonds than a romance between characters with director Shin saying that most of the story was about family, and only a small fraction was about Duck-Seon’s love.[14]

    Comment:  period piece circa 1988 set in Ssangmoondong, a typical middle-class neighborhood in northern Seoul. End comment

    Cosmos commentary:

    similar to a US movie from a few years back.  Two cops are linked through a mysterious connection across allowing them to collaborate to solve crime cases.

    Signal (South Korean TV series)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    This article is about the South Korean TV series. For the Japanese remake, see Signal (Japanese TV series).

    Signal
    Promotional poster
    Hangul 시그널
    Genre Procedural

    Drama

    Thriller

    Fantasy

    Created by Choi Jin-hee

    Park Ji-young

    Written by Kim Eun-hee
    Directed by Kim Won-seok
    Starring Lee Je-hoon

    Kim Hye-soo

    Cho Jin-wooing

    Opening theme “I Will Forget You” by Jung Cha-Sik
    Ending theme “The One Who Will Leave” by INKII

    “The Road” by Kim Yoon-ah

    Composers Kim Joon-Seok

    Park Sung-il

    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 1
    No. of episodes 16
    Production
    Executive producers Lee Chan-ho

    Lee Sang-bake

    Producers Lee Jae-moon

    Park Eun-Kyung

    Cinematography Choi Sang-mook

    Lee Joo-young

    Editor Kim Na-young
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 80 minutes
    Production company a Story
    Distributor tvN
    Release
    Original network tvN
    Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release January 22 –
    March 12, 2016
    Chronology
    Followed by Signal 2 (2020)[1]
    Related shows Signal (2018)

    Unknown Number (2019)

    External links
    Website
    Signal at a Story Co., Ltd.

    Signal (Korean: 시그널; RR: Diegueno) is a 2016 South Korean fantasy police procedural television series starring Lee Je-hoonKim Hye-soo, and Cho Jin-wrong. It aired on tvN from January 22 to March 12, 2016, on Fridays and Saturdays at 20:30 KST for 16 episodes.[2][3][4] The series was inspired by real-life criminal incidents in Korea,[5] including the Hazing.[6][7]

    The series received widespread acclaim from the audience and critics alike for its story and performances. It is also the eleventh highest-rated Korean drama in cable television history with a peak audience viewership of 12.54%.

    Premise[edit]

    walkie-talkie allows a detective in the year 1989 to communicate with a cold case profiler from 2015. With the power of fore- and hindsight, the two not only solve crimes but prevent them from ever taking place.

    Synopsis[edit]

    criminal profiler Park Hae-young (Lee Je-hoon), solves a kidnapping case that ended up with a falsely accused who disappeared after the crime, with a mysterious walkie-talkie he picks up. The success of this case triggers the formation of a long-term cold case team, led by Detective Cha Soo-Hyun (Kim Hye-soo), who has been searching for her long-lost mentor Lee Jae-Han (Cho Jin-Wong), for the past fifteen years. With the help of Detective Lee Jae-Han, the person at the other end of the walkie-talkie, Park Hae-young solves other cold cases that have remained unsolved for years, while helping Lee Jae-can help solve some cases in the past. Grave unintended sequences follow.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Lee Je-hoon is Park Hae-young,[8] the profiler who finds the walkie-talkie by accident and uses it to solve cold cases.

    Kim Hye-soo as Cha Soo-Hyun,[9] once a timid rookie and the first woman police officer in the department, leads the “Long Term Cold Case team”

    Cho Jin-Wong as Lee Jae-Han,[10] the somewhat clumsy and socially inept but incorruptible police officer from the past who establishes a rapport with Park.

    Supporting[edit]

    Police officers

    Jang Hyun-sung as Kim Bum-joo

    Jung Hae-kyun as Ahn Chi-soo

    Kim Won-hae as Kim Eichel

    Jung Han-bi [ko] as Oh Yoon-seo

    Lee Yoo-Jun [ko] as Jung Han-ki

    Kim Min-kyu as Hwang Etui-kyung

    Extended

    Kim Hyun-bin as young Park Hae-young

    Kang Chan-hee as Park Sun-woo

    Lee Moon-soo as Lee Jae-Han’s father

    Seo Jun-hee as Cha Soo-Hyun’s mother

    Lim Hwa-young as Cha Soo-Hyun’s younger sister

    Lee Jin-Kwon as Supporting

    Special appearances[edit]

    Oh Yeon-ah as Yoon Soo-ah (ep. 1-2)

    Lee Young-eun as Kim Yoon-jung (ep. 1-2)

    Lee Si-a as Kim Won-kyung (ep. 2-4)

    Kim Jung-young as Won-Kyung’s aunt (ep. 2-4)

    Kim Ki-Cheon as Lee Chun-goo (ep. 3-4)

    Lee Dong-ha as Han Se-yo (el. 5-8)

    Jung Suk-yong as Oh Kyung-tea (ep. 5-7)

    Park Si-eun as Oh Eun-ji (ep. 5-6)

    Choi Woo-ri as Shin Yeo-jin (ep. 5-6)

    Yoo Ha-bok as Shin Dong-hoon (ep. 5-7)

    Son Hyun-Joo as Jang Young-Chula (ep. 7, 11, 14, 16)

    Lee Na-ra as Shin Da-Hye (ep. 7-8)

    Lee Sang-year as Kim Jin-woo (ep. 9-11)

    Lee Chae-Kyung as Jin-woo’s mother (ep. 10)

    Seo Eun-ah as Yoo Seung-yeon (ep. 10-11)

    Shin Yi-joon as Kang Hye-Seung (young / ep. 11-14)

    Kim Woo-suk as Lee Dong-jin (ep. 12-14)

    Hwang Seung-eon as Han Do-yeon (ep. 13)

    Jeon Su-ji as Kang Hye-Seung (adult/ep. 13-14)

    Seo Ji-hoon as Jang Tae-jin (ep. 14)

    Upon its premiere, the series attracted attention for weaving actual cases into its plot and attained high ratings.[11][12] With its final rating of 12.54%, it is one of the highest-rated Korean dramas in cable television history.[13][14] It received praise for its solid acting, tightly-constructed plot, and detailed and sophisticated direction; and enjoyed success internationally in China and Japan.[15][16][17]

    The drama went on to win several awards from different award-giving bodies, including Best Drama, Best Screenplay for Kim Eun-hee, and Best Actress for Kim Hye-soo at the 52nd Buesking Arts Awards, as well as another Best Actress award for Kim and the Dasani (Grand Prize for Television) for Cho Jin-Wong at the tvN10 Awards. Cho also won the Dasani at the 1st Asia Artist Awards for his performance.

     

    Comment: similar to a US drama a few years ago. End comment

    My Mister

     

    My Mister
    Promotional poster
    Also known as My Ajose
    Hangul 나의 아저씨
    Revised Romanization Naoi Ajose
    Genre Drama
    Created by Studio Dragon
    Written by Park Hae-young[1]
    Directed by Kim Won-seok[1]
    Starring Lee San-kyun

    Lee Ji-eun

    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 16
    Production
    Executive producers Cho Hyung-jin

    Kim Sang-heon

    Park Ho-sik

    Producer Park Ji-hyun
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 90 minutes
    Production company Chorogram Media
    Distributor tvN
    Release
    Original network tvN
    Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release March 21 –
    May 17, 2018
    External links
    Website
    Production website

    My Mister (Korean: 나의 아저씨; RR: Naoi Ajose) is a 2018 South Korean television series starring Lee Sun-Kyun and Lee Ji-Eun. The series was directed by Kim Won-Seok, written by Park Hae-young, and produced by Cookable. It aired on tvN from March 21 to May 17, 2018, on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 21:30 (KST) time slot.[2][3][4]

    The drama received critical acclaim, winning Best Drama at the 55th Buesking Arts Awards.

    Synopsis[edit]

    My Mister tells us the story of three middle-aged brothers, who are enduring the weight of their lives, and a strong, cold woman, who has been living a hard life of her own, as they come together in healing each other’s past scars.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Lee Sun-kyun as Park Dong-hoon[1]

    The second oldest of the three brothers. He works as a structural engineer and always has a safety-first approach to life. He is quiet and stoic but also goes all in for the people he loves.

    Lee Ji-eun (IU) as Lee Ji-an[1]

    Kim Gyu-ri as child Ji-an

    A woman who is enduring many hardships in life. She is tasked by her boss who runs a company she is temporarily working for to discover Park Dong-hood’s weaknesses, but she soon ends up falling for his warm charms and learns to trust someone for the first time.

    Supporting[edit]

    Dong-hood’s family[edit]

    Go Doo-shim as Byun Yo-soon[5]

    A loving mother with three sons who worries about her eldest living apart from his family, and her youngest, who has yet to get married despite being over 40.

    Park Ho-san [ko] as Park Sang-hoon[6]

    Dong-hood’s eldest brother. He is a middle-aged man who was fired from his job and then ran two failing businesses, which ended up in him being chased out of his own home. Though he has to live under his mother’s roof, he’s a romanticist at heart who always thinks about ways to find happiness.

    Song Sae-beak as Park Ki-hoon[1]

    Dong-hood’s younger brother. He was once seen as a genius director because an independent film he shot when he was twenty was invited to the Cannes Film Festival. However, 20 years have passed since his glory days. He has yet to successfully launch his career as a movie director.

    Lee Ji-ah is Kang Yoon-hee,[7] Park Dong-hood’s wife, who is having an affair with Do Joon-young, her husband’s boss who is younger than him.

    Jung Young-joo [ko] as Jo Ae-Ryun.[8]

    Lee Ji-ant’s family[edit]

    Son Sook [ko] as Lee Bong-ae: Lee Ji-ant’s deaf grandmother.

    People around Lee Ji-an[edit]

    Jang Ki-yong as Lee Kwang-il[9]

    A loan shark, who liked Ji-and when he was young.

    Ahn Seung-gun as Song Ki-bum[10]

    Ji-ant’s best friend.

    Lee Young-seok [ko] as Hongdae: Kwang-ill’s partner.

    People in the company[edit]

    Kim Young-min [ko] as Do Joon-young[11]

    Dong-hood’s college junior and Ji-ant’s boss, currently working as a CEO.

    Shin Goo as Chairman Jang Hoe-jang

    Jung Jae-sung [ko] as Executive Director Yoon Sang-tea

    Seo Hyun-woo as Head of Section Seo

    Chae Dong-hyun [ko] as Kim Dae-ri

    Kim Min-seok [ko] as Yeo Hyung-kyu

    Ryu Sun-young [ko] as Jung Chae-rung[12]

    Dong-hoon and Ji-ant’s co-worker.

    Extended[edit]

    Kwon Na-ra as Choi Yoo-ra[13]

    A movie actress, and Park Ki-hood’s love interest.

    Park Hae-joon as Gumede

    Dong-hood’s friend and has dated Jung-hee in the past.

    Oh Na-ra as Jung-hee

    Owner of Jung-hee’s Bar, friends with Dong-hoon.

    Shin Dam-soo [ko] as Director Jung Chang-mo

    Park Soo-young as Je-Cheol

     

     

    Hospital Playlist

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    navigation Jump

    Hospital Playlist
    Official promotional poster season 2
    Hangul 슬기로운 의사생활
    Hanja 슬기로운 醫師生活
    Genre Medical

    Drama

    Romance

    Comedy

    Life

    Created by Lee Myung-Han (tvN)
    Written by Lee Woo-Jung
    Directed by Shin Won-ho
    Starring Jo Jung-suk

    Yoo Yeon-Seok

    Jung Kyung-ho

    Kim Dae-Myung

    Jeon Mi-do

    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 2
    No. of episodes 24
    Production
    Executive producer Park Seung Jae
    Producer Choi Sung Yoon
    Camera setup Single-camera
    Running time 72–113 minutes
    Production companies Egg Is Coming

    CJ ENM

    Distributor tvN

    Netflix[1]

    Release
    Original network tvN
    Picture format HDTV 1080i
    Original release March 12, 2020 –
    present
    External links
    Website

    Hospital Playlist (Korean: 슬기로운 의사생활; Hanja: 슬기로운

    The series follows five doctors in their 40s who have been best friends since they entered medical school in 1999. Lee Ik-Jun (Jo Jung-suk) is an assistant professor of general surgery specializing in liver transplants. He takes care of his young son as a single father after getting divorced from his adulterous wife. His cheerful charisma allows him to connect with many people, making him a popular figure among both patients and other doctors. Unapologetically good at anything he puts his mind to, Ahn Jeong-won (Yoo Yeon-Seok), an assistant professor of pediatric surgery, is generous and caring, endearing him to his patients. He is a devout Catholic and secretly plans to become a priest due to the pain caused by seeing his patients suffer. Kim Jun-wan (Jung Kyung-ho) is an associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery, who appears cold and professional. However, he hides a soft, kind temperament that rarely shows, only surfacing with his friends and certain patients. Yang Seok-Hyeong (Kim Dae-Myung), an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology, is an aloof and introverted doctor. Though he comes off as detached, he is willing to go the extra mile for the female patients under his watch. He is divorced and deeply cares for his mother. Chae Song-Hwa (Jeon Mi-do), the only female in the group of friends, is an associate professor of neurosurgery. She is considered perfect by her colleagues: she treats patients kindly, performs hundreds of successful surgeries, and has a great personality.

    The story revolves around a group of friends as they embark on hospital adventures involving medicine, music, and relationships.

    Cast[edit]

    Overview[edit]

    Actor Character Season
    (Year)
    1
    (2020)
    2
    (2021)
    Jo Jung-suk Lee Ik-Jun Main
    Yoo Yeon-Seok Ahn Jeong-won Main
    Jung Kyung-ho Kim Jun-wan Main
    Kim Dae-Myung Yang Seok-Hyeong Main
    Jeon Mi-do Chae Song-Hwa Main
    Shin Hyun-bin Jang Gyro-wool Recurring
    Kwak Sun-young Lee Ik-sun Recurring
    Ahn Eun-jin Choo Min-ha Recurring
    Jung Moon-sung Do Jae-hack Recurring
    Moon Tae-Joo Yong Seok-min Recurring
    Ha Yoon-Kyung Heo Sun-Bin Recurring
    Kim Jun-Han Ahn Chi-Hong Recurring

    Main[edit]

    Jo Jung-suk as Lee Ik-Jun, an assistant professor of general surgery.

    Yoo Yeon-Seok as Ahn Jeong-won, an assistant professor of pediatric surgery.

    Jung Kyung-ho as Kim Jun-wan, an associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery.

    Kim Dae-Myung is Yang Seok-Hyeong, an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

    Jeon Mi-do as Chae Song-Hwa, an associate professor of neurosurgery.[11]

    Supporting[edit]

    Doctors[edit]

    Shin Hyun-bin as Jang Gyro-wool, a third-year resident in general surgery.

    Jung Moon-sung as Do Jae-hack, chief resident of cardiothoracic surgery.

    Ahn Eun-jin as Choo Min-ha, a second-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology.[12]

    Kim Jun-Han is Ahn Chi-Hong, a third-year resident in neurosurgery.

    Moon Tae-you as Yong Seok-min, chief resident of neurosurgery.

    Ha Yoon-Kyung as Heo Sun-bin, a third-year resident in neurosurgery.

    Choi Young-Joon as Bong Gwang-Hyun, assistant professor of emergency medicine.

    Seo Jin-won as Min Gi-Joon, professor of neurosurgery.

    Kim Hye-in as Myung Eun-won, a second-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology.[13]

    Choi Young-woo as Cheon Myung-tea, professor of cardiothoracic surgery.

    Shin Do-Hyun as Bae Joon-hee, the fellow in emergency medicine.

    Jeon Kwang-jin as Jong Se-hyuk, the fellow in orthopedic surgery.

    Lee Se-hee as Kang So-ye, one-year Fellow in emergency medicine [14]

    Woo Jung-won as Yom Se-hee, Professor of Stainbrook [15]

    Lee Jong-won as Kim Geon [16]

    Lee Jung-won as Hwang Ji-woo, second-year surgeon [17]

    Nurses and medical students[edit]

    Kim Soo-jin as Song Soo-bin, surgical ward nurse.

    Yoon Hye-RI as So Yi-Hyun, cardiothoracic surgery medical assistant.

    Yang Jo-ah as Hwang Jae-shin, neurosurgery medical assistant.

    Lee Noh-ah as Lee Young-ha, surgical ward nurse.

    Lee Dal as Kim Jae-hwan, surgical ward nurse.

    Lee Hye-Eun as Kook Hye-sung, general surgery medical assistant.

    Lee Ji-won as Han Hyun-hee, pediatric surgery medical assistant.

    Lee Jong-won as Kim Geon-run, second-year surgeon major.

    Kim Ji-sung as Han Seung-Joo, obstetrics and gynecology delivery room nurse.

    Seol Yu-jin as Eun Sun-jin, obstetrics, and gynecology medical assistant.

    Kim Bi-bi as Ham Deok-Joo, transplant coordinator.

    Park Han-sol as Sun woo Hee-soo, emergency room nurse.

    Cho Yi-hyun as Jang Yun-bok, third-year medical student.[18]

    Bae Hyun-sung as Jang Hong-do, third-year medical student.

    Kim Kang-min as Im Chang-min, intern.

    Lee Chan-Hyung as Choi Seon-young, intern.

    Chae Min-hee as So-Yeon, [19]

    Family members of the main characters[edit]

    Kwak Sun-young is Lee Ik-sun, Ik-Joon’s younger sister and Jun-win’s girlfriend.

    Kim Joon as Lee Woo-Joo, Ik-Joon’s son.

    Kim Hae-sook as Jung Rosa, Jeong-won’s mother.

    Sung Dong-il is Jeong-won’s eldest brother.

    Kim Kapp-soo as Joo Jong-soo, president of the Yule Foundation.

    Cho Seung-Yeon as Joo Jun, director of Yule Medical Center.

    Moon Hee-Kyung as Cho Young-Hye, Seok-Yeong’s mother.

    Nam Myung-real as Yang Tae-yang, Seok-Hyeon’s father.

    Lee So-Yoon is Kim Tae-yeon, Yang Tae-yang’s mistress.

     

    Comments:  Like a Korean version of Gray’s Anatomy?  End Comment

    Flower of Evil

     

    Flower of Evil (TV series)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    navigation Jump

    Flower of Evil
    Promotional poster
    Hangul 악의 꽃
    Genre Melodrama

    Suspense

    Created by Monster Union
    Studio Dragon
    Written by Yoo Jung-hee
    Directed by Kim Cheol-kyu
    Starring Lee Joon-gi

    Moon Chae-won

    Jang Hee-jin

    Seo Hyun-woo

    Composers Kim Jun-Seok
    Jung Se-rin
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 16
    Production
    Executive producer Yoo Sang won
    Producer Jung Hae-Rayong

    Jang Shin-ae

    Kim Dae-ho

    Editor Younghood Kim
    Running time 70 minutes
    Production companies Monster Union
    Studio Dragon
    Distributor tvN
    Release
    Original network tvN
    Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
    Audio format Dolby Digital
    Original release July 29 –
    September 23, 2020
    External links
    Website

    Flower of Evil (Korean: 악의 꽃; RR: Ague knot) is a South Korean television series starring Lee Joon-giMoon Chae-wonJang Hee-jin, and Seo Hyun-woo.[1][2][3] It aired on tvN every Wednesday and Thursday from July 29 to September 23, 2020,[4] and streamed internationally on IliyaViki, and Vito with multi-languages subtitles. Lee and Moon have previously starred in Criminal Minds, and it was Lee’s return to television after two years.[5]

     

    Synopsis[edit]

    Baek Hee-sung (Lee Joon-gi) is a man who hides his identity and past from his wife Cha Ji-won (Moon Chae-won), a detective. On the surface, they appear to be the perfect family: a loving couple with a beautiful daughter who adores her parents. Cha Ji-won and her colleagues begin investigating a series of unexplained murders and are confronted with the reality that her seemingly perfect husband may be hiding something from her.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Lee Joon-gi as Baek Hee-sung / Do Hyun-soo[1]

    Park Hyun-joon as young Hyun-soo

    Cha Sung-je as child Hyun-soo

    Moon Chae-won as Cha Ji-won, Hee-sung/Hyun-soo’s wife[1]

    Jang Hee-jin as Do Hae-soo[2]

    Lim Na-young as teenage Hae-soo, Hyun-soo’s older sister[6]

    Lee Chae-Yoon as eleven-year-old Hae-soo

    Seo Hyun-woo as Kim Moo-jin, journalist[3]

    Jeong Taek-hyun as young Moo-jin[7]

    Supporting[edit]

    Baek Hee-sung & Cha Ji-won’s family[edit]

    Jung Seo-Yeon as Baek Eun-ha, daughter of Hee-sung and Ji-won[8]

    Son Jong-hakas Baek Man-woo, Hee-Sung’s father[9]

    Nam Gi-ae as Gong Mi-Ja, Hee-Sung’s mother[10]

    Jo Kyung-sook as Moon Young-ok, Ji-won’s mother[11]

    Kanoo Police Station[edit]

    Choi Dae-hoon as Lee Woo-Cheol, leader of Homicide Investigation Team[10]

    Choi Young-Joon as Choi Jae-sub, veteran detective[10]

    Kim Soo Oh as Im Ho-Joon, youngest team member[10]

    Lim Cha-ching as Yoon Sang-pill, section chief[10]

    Hong Seo-Joon as Oh Young-Joon, police captain

    Hanoian Magazine[edit]

    Yang Hye-jin as Gang Pill-young, lead reporter[10]

    Ju Ye-Eun as Reporter Joo

    Others[edit]

    Choi Byung-mo as Do Min-seok, father of Hae-soo and Hyun-soo

    Kim Ji-hoon as Baek Hee-sung

    Choi Kwon-soo as young Hee-sung

    Lee Kyu-bok as Nam Soon-gill

    Kim Geon as Kim In-seo

    Lee Ju-Yeon as Park Seo-young

    Han Soo-Yeon as Jung Mi-sook

    Yoon Byung-hee as Park Kyung-chon, taxi driver and husband of Jung Mi-sook

    Park Seung-tea as Oh Bok-ja

    Kim Ki-Cheon as Dr. Lee Hyun-suk

     

    1. Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Rye(2016)

    15 | 60 min | Drama, Fantasy, History

    Rate

    Korean melodramatic adaptation of Chinese drama Startling by Each Step (2011) follows a woman who travels back in time to the Goryeo Dynasty of Korea whenever a total eclipse of the sun took place.

    Stars: Lee Joon-GiJi-eon LeeKang Ha-NealNam Joo-Hyuk

    1. Sangsogjadeul(2013)

    15 | 55 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    After a chance encounter in LA, two teens from different social backgrounds reunite at an exclusive high school attended by Korea’s Uber rich.

    Stars: Lee Min-HoPark Shin-HyeWoo-bin KimKim Ji-Won

    1. Kill Me, Heal Me(2015)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    Rate

    A love story between the son from a wealthy family who has 7 personalities Cha Do Hyun (Ji Sung) and Oh Ri Jin (Hwang Jung Elum) who becomes his secret psychiatrist.

    Stars: Seong JiHwang Jeong-elmKim Hee-JungShim Hye-jin

    1. Healer(2014–2015)

    TV-14 | 60 min | Action, Comedy, Crime

    An old murder incident involving a group who ran an illegal broadcasting station brings together different people – a mysterious errand guy “Healer” who possesses disguise and fighting … See full summary »

    Stars: Ji Chang-WookPark Min-YoungTae-MiJeong Guy-Su

    Votes: 6,769

     

    1. My Love from Another Star(2013–2014)

    Not Rated | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

    Do Min-Joon, an alien that came to our planet 400 years ago, will be able to return to his planet in 3 months, but when he meets famous actress Chun Song-Yi, all the centuries he spent distancing himself from humans come to an end.

    Stars: Jun Ji-HyunKim Soo-HyunPark Hae-JinYoo In-Na

    Votes: 10,186

     

    1. Oogonium (2013)

    Tae Gong Sil can see ghosts, but their constant demands of help make her life impossible until she meets Joo Jong Won, handsome CEO that measures everything with money since when she touches him, the ghosts disappear.

    Stars: Kong Hyo-JinSo Ji-sobSeo In-GukYoo-Ri Kim

     

    1. Haereul poteen dal(2012)

    TV-Y | Drama, Fantasy, Romance

    The story of the secret love between Lee Hwan, a fictional king of Joseon, and Wool, a female shaman. Wool was born as Heo Yeon Woo, the daughter of a noble family who won the love of the … See full summary »

    Stars: Mi-seen JeonMi-keying YangEung-soo Kim, Eun-Byul

    Votes: 2,034

     

    1. Boys Over Flowers(2009)

    TV-14 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    Poor girl attends the elite Shin Hwa High and is bullied by the leader of F4 (the four richest boys). He becomes attracted to her; however, she has a crush on his best friend. Whom will she choose?

    Stars: Ku Hye-SunLee Min-HoKim Hyun-JongKim Bum

    1. Minami Shiny(2009)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Music

    Go Mi-Nya, a girl about to become a nun is asked to cover for her indisposed twin brother, Mi-Nam, who’s on the verge of becoming a k-idol. To do so, she disguises herself as a boy and joins Arnell, a really popular boy band.

    Stars: Park Shin-Hye, Yong-Hwa, Yong-Hwa JungHong-ki Lee

    TV-Y | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

    Love, tradition, and politics collide when a spirited young art student is betrothed to the crown prince of South Korea.

    Stars: Yun Geun-HyeJu Ji-HoonSong Ji-HyoBool-am Choi

    1. Mischievous Kiss(2010)

    15 | 66 min | Comedy, Romance

    Fate brings polar opposite high school classmates (one obsessively attracted to the other, the other indifferent to all advances) to live under one roof. Is romance possible?

    Stars: Jung So-MinKim Hyun-JongTae-Sung LeeHye-Young Jung

    1. Sungkyunkwan Scandal(2010)

    TV-Y | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, History

    In the Joseon era, Kim Yoon-hee masquerades as a boy to earn a living as a book transcriber. Her family’s dire circumstances and the encouragement of a noble’s son finally drive her to attend Shunyuan University, forbidden for females.

    Stars: Park Min-YoungYoo-chum ParkYoo Ah-inSong Jong-ki

    1. Ok-tab-bang Wang-se-ja(2012)

    15 | 65 min | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance

    Crown Prince Yi gak finds that he has been transported from Chosun Dynasty to modern-day Seoul. He meets Hong Se Na, who bears a striking resemblance to his dead wife, and is determined to … See full summary »

    Stars: Woo-Sik ChoiSeok-won JeongYu-mi JeongHan Ji-min

    1. Mai gel(2005–2006)

    With a perpetually indebted father, Joo Yoo Rin learned to lie on the spot and get herself out of tricky situations, which gets Seal Gong Chan, a rich heir to a company, to hire her to impersonate his long lost cousin.

    Stars: Lee Da-haveLee Dong-WookLee Joon-GiSi-Yeon Park

    1. Shining Inheritance(2009)

    15 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    After losing her father Go Eunson’s stepmother kicks her and her autistic brother out of the house. Shortly after her brother is kidnapped. Eon-sung now has to look for her brother while also trying to find a job to survive.

    Stars: Han Hyo-jookLee Seung-giMoon Chae-WonSoo-bin Bae

    1. 마이 프린세스(2011)

    15 | 65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    Kim Tae-hee plays Lee Seal, an ordinary college student who finds out she’s a princess and the great-granddaughter of Korea’s last Emperor. But life can be complicated for a princess in this funny, quirky melodrama.

    Stars: Song Seung-HeonKim Tae-heePark YeonSoo-young Ryu

    1. Angkeumhan Dashingly(2014– )

    Na Ae-ra (Lee Min-Jung) and Cha Jung-woo (Joo Sang-wok) got married young. Ae-ra wanted to have steady life but Jung-woo business led them to lots of debt and hard work so she broke off … See full summary »

    Stars: Lee Min-JungSang-UK Joo, Gyu-Ri, Seo Kang-Joon

    1. All About My Romance(2013– )

    A conservative government party member falls for the feisty young leader of an upstart liberal party in this Korean romantic comedy.

    Stars: Shin Ha-kinLee Min-JungHee-soon ParkChae-Ah Han

    1. Protect the Boss(2011)

    TV-Y | 65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    After a long stretch of unemployment, No Eon Seol lands a job as secretary to Cha Ji Heon the youngest son of a rich family. However, her secretary duties go beyond the ordinary, helping her boss cope and function in normal society.

    Stars: Gi-soo ByionHwa-Yeon ChaKang-hee ChoiJeong Gyu-Su

    1. The King 2 Hearts(2012)

    15 | 65 min | Action, Drama, Romance

    The crown prince of South Korea is forced to work alongside a female North Korean military officer. Political and emotional complications lead to an uneasy marriage engagement.

    Stars: Lee Seung-giHa Ji-WonJo Jung-SukJason-Patrick Taylor

    1. Bool-up Eosin Jungyi(2013– )

    15 | Drama, History, Romance

    A Historical drama about Yoo Jung, also known as Jung Yi, the first female potter in the Joseon Dynasty and regarded as the dojo of Shin taro porcelain. ‘Yoo Jung’ is based on the real … See full summary »

    Stars: Moon Geun-youngSang-Yoon LeeKim BumKeon-Hyeong Park

    1. Nae Yeojachinguneun Gumshoe(2010)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance

    Chae Die Wong, an aspiring actor, unwillingly releases a Gumshoe, a legendary nine-tailed fox, from her centuries-old prison. He runs away terrified and ends up injuring himself badly, but she saves his life and asks him to stay by his side.

    Stars: Shin Min-aLee Seung-giMin-woo NoPark Soo-Jin

    Votes: 2,693

     

    1. Naege Geothermally Haebwa(2011)

    15 | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.2

     

    Rate

    A woman, jealous when her friend steals her first love and marries him, lies that she is married too. The lie ensnares a hotel president who goes along with the lie for his reasons. Will the lie become reality?

    Stars: Seung-us RyuYun Geun-hyeYun-hie JoSung Jun

    Votes: 1,257

     

    1. Un-Myong-Cheol-eom neol sa-rang-hae(2014)

    TV-14 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

    7.9

     

    Rate

    A touching Korean drama filled with comedy about a girl who finds happiness, friendship, and love in the most unexpected way!

    Stars: Jang HyukJang Na-raChoi Jin-Hyuk, churl

    Votes: 2,036

     

    1. Shinai (2012)

    60 min | Drama, Fantasy, History

    8

     

    Rate

    When the queen-to-be of medieval Korea is badly wounded, Captain Choi Young uses a wormhole to “heaven,” which is 21st-century South Korea, to bring back the spoiled Dr. Yoo Eon-Soo who becomes a pawn in a game of human chess.

    Stars: Kim Hee-seenYoon Kyun-SangLee Min-HoDeok-Hwan Ryu

    Votes: 2,256

     

    1. The 1st Shop of Coffee Prince(2007)

    15 | 55 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    8.2

     

    Rate

    A tomboy, mistaken for a lad, maintains the deception for the sake of employment. The situation becomes complicated when her male boss begins to develop feelings for this “boy.”

    Stars: Gong YooYun Geun-HyeSun-Kyun LeeJeong-an Chae

    Votes: 4,627

     

    1. 동이(2010)

    TV-Y | 60 min | Drama, History, Romance

    8

     

    Rate

    Story a simple maid that rises high in the royal harem as a consort and, ultimately, mother of the Korean king.

    SARS: Han Hyo-JooJulia LimKim Yoo-JeongDa-Min Han

    Votes: 1,349

     

    1. Love in the Moonlight(2016)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.8

     

    Rate

    The unlikely love story between a crown prince and his eunuch.

    Stars: Park Bo-GumKim Yoo-JeongChae Soo-binKwak Dong-Yeon

    Votes: 2,344

     

    1. She Was Pretty(2015)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

    7.7

     

    Rate

    When Ji Sung-Joon was young, he was ugly. As he grew up, he began to have an attractive appearance. When Kim Hye-Jin was young, she was pretty. As she grew up, she became ugly. Ji Sung-Joon tries to find his first love.

    Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeo Jun ParkJun-hee KoSi Won Choi

    Votes: 4,025

     

    1. Bimal (2013)

    15 | Drama, Romance

    8.1

     

    Rate

    A devoted woman makes the ultimate sacrifice for her boyfriend, only to learn that love doesn’t always conquer all. Yoo Jeong (Hwang Jeong Elum) is a sweet, upbeat person who has always … See full summary »

    Stars: Hwang Jeong-elmSeong JiSoo-bin BaeLee Da-hee

    Votes: 1,031

     

    1. Naemsaereul Boneen Sonyeo(2015)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

    7.1

     

    Rate

    Detective Tae Ho lost his younger sister to a barcode-murder case and lost his ability to taste, smell, and feel pain. He then meets Oh Cho Rim, the only witness to the murder case who possesses a special sense: she can see smells.

    Stars: Yoo-chum ParkShin Se-KyungJin-Seo YoonMin Nakong

    Votes: 1,023

     

    1. Sesang Eddied Eobneun Chakhan Namja(2012)

    15 | 60 min | Drama

    7.8

     

    Rate

    Kang Ma-Ru is a promising medical student until he takes the blame for a crime he didn’t commit. When he finds an opportunity for revenge, he takes it, using Seo Eon-Gi. Ma-Ru soon … See full summary »

    Stars: Song Jong-kiMoon Chae-WonSi-Yeon ParkKwang-Soo Lee

    Votes: 1,604

     

    1. Descendants of the Sun(2016)

    TV-14 | 60 min | Action, Comedy, Drama

    8.3

     

    Rate

    This drama tells of the love story that develops between a surgeon and a special forces officer.

    Stars: Song Jong-kiSong Hye-KyoJin GooKim Ji-Won

    Votes: 11,373

     

    1. Haideu, Jail, Na(2015)

    15 | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7

     

    Rate

    Koo Seo-Jin (Hyun-Bin) has two different personalities. One of his personalities is cold like Hyde and the other is sweet like Jekyll.

    Stars: Hyun BinHan Ji-minHee-Sung Kwak, Hyerim

    Votes: 986

     

    1. O Ma-i Bi-neo-seu(2015–2016)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.8

     

    Rate

    A lawyer in her thirties coming out of a long relationship decides to regain her figure and health after meeting a renowned personal trainer who obsesses with leading a healthy lifestyle after suffering a serious injury in his childhood.

    Stars: So Ji-sobShin Min-aSung HoonYoo In-young

    Votes: 3,817

     

    1. Secret Garden(2010–2011)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

    8.1

     

    Rate

    A rich young CEO falls for a poor stuntwoman despite class differences, cultural traditions, and the man’s firmly objecting mother.

    Stars: Ha Ji-WonHyun BinYoon Sang-HyunSa-rang Kim

    Votes: 5,961

     

    1. Gamy eon (2015)

    15 | Drama, Romance

    7.8

     

    Rate

    Ji-sook facing a hard time because of her father’s debts and begin being chased by moneylenders. When a series of things happen Ji-sook has to live with Eon Ha’s identity (a Woman from an elite family) because she looks exactly like Eon Ha.

    Stars: Soo AeJu Ji-HoonJeong-Hun YeonYoo In-young

    Votes: 344

     

    1. Hungrier (2013– )

    Not Rated | Drama, Romance

    6.9

     

    Rate

    At 42-years-old, Kwon Yolo (Lee Beom Soo) is South Korea’s youngest prime minister ever. On top of his reputation of being an honest man of the utmost integrity, he’s also a widower who … See full summary »

    Stars: Im Yoon-ah, us, Yoon Shi-YoonJeong-an Chae

    Votes: 332

     

    1. Pool ha-woo-sue(2004)

    TV-14 | 60 min | Comedy, Romance

    7.9

     

    Rate

    In a bid to reacquire her childhood home, a free-spirited woman agrees to a sham marriage with a selfish actor. Their daily lives are complicated by overlapping love triangles and comic misadventures.

    Stars: Song Hye-KyoRain, Eun-Jeong, Seong-su Kim

    Votes: 3,112

     

    1. Kawagoe (2005– )

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.6

     

    Rate

    Chun-Hyang is smart and sassy and becomes involved with good-looking Mongering. His first love Chae-rim enters the picture. An older man, Hak-do, pursues her. Will they find their way back to each other?

    Stars: Chae-young HanHee JaeTae-wooing EdomSi-Eun Park

    Votes: 442

     

    1. Mary Stayed Out All Night(2010)

    65 min | Comedy, Drama, Music

    6.8

     

    Rate

    Wi Mae Ri is the cheerful, pragmatic daughter of a failed businessman who had grown used to being constantly on the move to escape from loan sharks. She becomes fast friends with the … See full summary »

    Stars: Moon Geun-young, Hyo-Jin, Kim Jae-WookHyo-jin Kim

    Votes: 719

     

    1. City Hunter(2011)

    TV-Y | 60 min | Action, Romance, Thriller

    8.1

     

    Rate

    Lee Yun-song was trained by his father’s best friend to get revenge on the government for killing everyone in his father’s unit.

    Stars: Lee Min-HoPark Min-YoungSang-Jung KimHo-jin Chun

    Votes: 5,220

     

    1. Neon Neace Banhaesseo(2011)

    65 min | Drama, Music, Romance

    7.2

     

    Rate

    A series of misunderstandings causes Lee Shin, the cocky leader of “The Stupid” and Lee Guy-won, a student majoring in Traditional Korean Music to start on the wrong foot. Until she sees him performing live, and is immediately captivated.

    Stars: Yong-hwa JungPark Shin-HyeChang-up SongYi-Hyeon So

    Votes: 1,645

     

    1. Anderman (2015)

    15 | 70 min | Comedy, Drama

    7.6

     

    Rate

    This drama is about Jo Gang-JA, a mother who was known as a tough girl in high school. Her daughter Ah-ran is bullied at school and when Gang-JA finds out, she makes it her responsibility … See full summary »

    Stars: Kim Hee-seenKim Yoo-JeongHyun-Woo JiJi Soo

    Votes: 443

     

    1. Nae mi-eum-i deul-li-da(2011–)

    65 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.8

     

    Rate

    Can You Hear My Heart features Hallyu stars Kim Jae Won, Hwang Jung Elum, and Nam Goong Min in this romantic drama that shows us love in defiance of physical limitations? Dong Joo (played by … See full summary »

    Stars: Jae-won KimHwang Jeong-elmMin NamkoongLee Hye-Yeong

    Votes: 169

     

    1. Jang Ok-Jung, Sarang-e Salda(2013)

    15 | Drama, History, Romance

    7.5

     

    Rate

    Life Of Jang Ok Jung, Later Known as Jang Hee Bin, was one of the most famous Concubines of The Joseon Dynasty who was known for her hunger for power.

    Stars: Kim Tae-heeYoo Ah-inGeon-Ju LeeSoo-Hyun Hong

    Votes: 212

     

    1. Marriage Contract(2016)

    15 | 75 min | Drama

    7.6

     

    Rate

    Ji-Hoon (Lee Seo-Jin) has a cynical personality due to his family background. Even though he comes from a rich family, his mother had an affair with a married man and they had Ji-Hoon. From… See full summary »

    Stars: Seo-jin LeeKim You-JinYoo-Ri KimKim Kwang-guy

    Votes: 557

     

    1. Won-deo-pool la-i-pea(2005– )

    Comedy, Romance

    7.2

     

    Rate

    The story of Xu Tian who suffers big blows both in his love and work life. When he decides to leave America, where he has been living for 10 years, and returns to his home country, luck is not on his side.

    Stars: Frank PowersJun-yong Choi, Eun-Jeong, Hyeon Ju

    Votes: 106

     

    1. Dream High(2011–2012)

    15 | 70 min | Comedy, Music, Romance

    7.6

     

    Rate

    Dream High tells the story of six students at Kirin Art High School who work to achieve their dreams of becoming music stars in the Korean music industry. Go Hye Mi is a student who sings … See full summary »

    Stars: J.Y. ParkJin-won JungJi-eon LeeKim Soo-Hyun

    Votes: 2,549

     

    1. Personal Taste(2010)

    15 | 60 min | Comedy, Drama, Romance

    7.4

     

    Rate

    The surprise hit of 2010, Personal Taste (aka Personal Preference) garnered high ratings and a huge fanbase in a comedy that proves true love is found in the most unlikely places. Quirky … See full summary »

    Stars: Son Ye-jinLee Min-HoNam-Gil KimJi-Seok Kim

    Votes: 3,713

     

    1. Baegnyeon-ui Sibu(2014)

    15 | 67 min | Drama, Fantasy, Romance

    7.1

     

    Rate

    The Taeyang Corporation is the largest conglomerate in South Korea. The family that runs Taeyang has been under a curse for hundred years that the first bride of the eldest son will always … See full summary »

    Stars: Jin-Sung YangHong-ki LeeJung-Hee Nam

    DP

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

    A gripping drama based on true events about life in the Korean military and why some soldiers run away from their obligations amid the constant harassment and strict discipline of the Korean military. This drama hit a nerve among many Koreans who recall their trouble times in the military. The military has announced that they are discontinuing the DP unit but swore it had nothing to do with this drama.

     

    D.P. (TV series)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     

    D.P.
    Promotional poster
    Korean 디피
    Genre Drama

    Military

    Based on D.P Dog’s Day
    by Kim Bo-tong
    Screenplay by Kim Bo-tong

    Han Jun-hee

    Directed by Han Jun-hee
    Starring Jung Hae-in

    Koo Kyo-hwan

    Kim Sung-kyun

    Son Seok-Koo

    Composer Primary
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of episodes 6
    Production
    Executive producers Bien Seung-min

    Han Jun-hee

    Producer Kim Dong-min
    Cinematography Yoo Ji-sun
    Editor Park Min-sun
    Running time 45–55 minutes
    Production companies Climax Studio

    Shortcake

    Distributor Netflix
    Release
    Original network Netflix
    Original release August 27, 2021

    D.P. (an acronym for Deserter Pursuit) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Han Jun-hee, from a screenplay by Kim Bo-tong and Han, based on the Lezhin webtoon D.P Dog’s Day by Kim. The series stars Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-kyun, and Son Seok-Koo.[1][2] It premiered in six parts on Netflix on August 27, 2021.[3][4]

    Synopsis[edit]

    Set in 2014, D.P. tells the story of a team of Korean military police with their mission to catch deserters.

    The series magnifies the undesirable nature of the military, especially within a South Korean context. The widespread bullying and hazing as well as the mindset for the “survival of the fittest” are rife, with those presumed the “weakest” thrown to the bottom of the pile and served horrifying experiences at the hands of their superiors and compatriots.

    Private Ahn Joon-ho and Corporal Han Ho-Yul both team up to find the deserters, and end up on an adventurous journey.

    Cast[edit]

    Main[edit]

    Jung Hae-in as Private Ahn Joon-ho

    Koo Kyo-hwan as Corporal Han Ho-Yul

    Kim Sung-Kyun as Sergeant First Class Park Bum-gu

    Son Seok-Koo as Captain Im Ji-sup

    Supporting[edit]

    Jo Hyun-churl as Jo Suk-bong

    Shin Seung-ho as Hwang Jang-soo

    Park Se-joon as Heo Ki-young

    Park Jung-woo as Shin Woo-suk

    Kim Dong-young as Choi Joon-mok

    Lee Jun-young as Jung Hyun-min

    Choi Joon-young as Heo Chi-do

    Moon Sang-hoon as Kim Roo-ri

    Hyun Bong-sik as Chun Yong-duck

    Hong Kyung as Ryu Yi-Kang

    Bae Yoo-ram as Kim Kyu

    Han Woo-Yul as Tae Sung-goon

    Guest[edit]

    Go Kyung-pyro as Corporal Park Sung-woo (Ep. 1)

    Kwon Hae-Hyo as Ahn Joon-ho’s father (Eps. 1, 3–4)

    Lee Seol as Shin Woo-Seok’s sister (Eps. 1 & 6)

    Lee Jong-ok as an hinoeuma employee (Ep. 2)

    Development[edit]

    In late June 2020, Lashing officially announced that Lashing Studio and Homemade Film would co-produce a 6-part adaptation of the hit webtoon D.P: Dog Days by Kim Bo-tong, to be released exclusively through Netflix.[5][6] The story is based on Kim’s own experience during his mandatory military service.[7]

    Director and co-writer Han Jun-hee had wanted to work on the webtoon’s adaptation “for five or six years [before he] finally got a chance” to do so.[8] Though Ahn Joon-ho is a Corporal in the webtoon, Han wanted him to be a Private in the series so people could “resonate with the story and consider Joon-ho as a friend who just started his military service.”[9]

    Casting[edit]

    On September 3, 2020, Jung Hae-inKoo Kyo-hwanKim Sung-Kyun, and Son Seok-Koo were confirmed to star in the series.[10][11] Koo’s character does not appear in the webtoon, which he found “hard but exciting to portray a character exclusive to the series.”[12] To prepare for his role, Koo received help from his road manager who was part of the D.P. team during his military service.[13] As for Jung, he practiced boxing for three months before filming began, to do his action scenes.[14]

    Kim Bo-tong, who wrote the webtoon and co-wrote the series, commented that he “never dreamed of such a cast. They fit so perfectly into their roles that it seems like the roles were written for them.”[15]

    Filming[edit]

    Principal photography began in the summer of 2020.[16]

    Reception[edit]

    Audience viewership[edit]

    Following its release, the series topped Netflix’s Top 10 in South Korea.[17]

    Critical response[edit]

    William Schwartz of Han Cinema praised Jung Hae-in‘s acting, commenting that he “is sublime here, in a brooding cinematic role radically different from the romances he’s better known for.” He added that “D.P. is worth watching, not just by people curious what South Korean mandatory military service is like, but anyone from any country who’s seriously thinking about joining up.”[18]

    Pierce Conran of the South China Morning Post gave the series a 4.5/5 rating, noting that “D.P. hits home with a story that spans the past and present, as it acknowledges that yesterday’s problems can still be today’s.” He also praised the cinematography as well as Jung and Koo’s “electric chemistry”.[19] Daniel Hart of Ready Steady Cut also rated the series 4.5 stars out of 5, describing it as “the finest K-Drama mini-series this year.”[20]

    Greg Wheeler of The Review Geek rated the series 4.3/5, noting that “D.P. is a stunning Korean drama [which] takes an unflinching look at bullying, the effect it has on mental health and larger societal questions about the mandatory military service in Korea” and praising the series for its “impressive” cinematography and for the way it “explore[s] a very sensitive and prevalent topic in a raw, artistic and unflinching way.”[21]

    In a mixed review, Hitzig Jumaine of NME gave the series a 3/5 rating, commenting that “Kim Bo-tong and Han Jun-hee must be given credit for how this series tackles such extraordinarily difficult and tragic subject matter with compassion and sensitivity”, and praising the “uniformly excellent performances, splendid cinematography, addictive pacing, and intrepid commitment to shedding light on the appalling culture of bullying in the military”, but criticizing the “weak characterization [of the] three main leads” as well as the “ludicrous escalation of events during its climax, which suddenly turns a fairly grounded show into a melodramatic action thriller.”[22]

     

     

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

     

    Squid Games

     

    The top show on Netflix is not only in the US but also in Korea.  Reminiscent of both the “Maze”,  the “Hunger Games”, and the” Cube “ but done in a K Drama way. And addictive!

     

     

    Squid Game

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    navigation Jump

    Squid Game
    Promotional poster
    Also known as Round Six
    Hangul 오징어게임
    Revised Romanization Owing-ego Gem
    McCune–Reischauer Jingo Kemi
    Genre Actionadventure

    Suspense

    Survival

    Drama

    Created by Netflix
    Written by Hwang Dong-hyuk
    Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk
    Starring Lee Jung-Jae

    Park Hae-soo

    Wi Ha-joon

    Composer Jung Jae-il
    Country of origin South Korea
    Original language Korean
    No. of seasons 1
    No. of episodes 9 (list of episodes)
    Production
    Camera setup Multi-camera
    Running time 32–63 minutes
    Production company Siren Pictures Inc.[1]
    Distributor Netflix
    Release
    Original network Netflix
    Picture format 4K (Ultra HD)

    Dolby visión

    Audio format Dolby Atmos
    Original release September 17, 2021

    Squid Game (Korean: 오징어게임; RR: Jingle Gem) is a South Korean survival drama streaming television series written and directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk. The nine-episode series, starring Lee Jung-JaePark Hae-soo, and Wi Ha-Joon, tells the story of a group of people who risk their lives in a mysterious survival game with a 45.6 billion (US$38.7 million) prize.[2][3] It was released worldwide on September 17, 2021, by Netflix.[4][5]

    Premise

    Four hundred and fifty-six people, who have all struggled financially in life, are invited to play a mysterious survival competition. Competing in a series of traditional children’s games but with deadly twists, they risk their lives to compete for a 45.6 billion (US$38.5 million) prize.

    Cast and characters

    This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.
    Find sources: “Squid Game” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (September 2021) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

    Players

    Main characters[6]

    Lee Jung-Jae as Seong Gi-Hun (No. 456)[7]

    A chauffeur and a gambling addict, he lives with his mother and struggles to financially support his daughter. He participates in the Game to settle his many debts.

    Park Hae-soo as Cho Sang-woo (No. 218)

    The head of the investment team at a securities company, he was a junior to Gi-Hun, and was a gifted student who entered Seoul National University, but is now wanted by the police for stealing money from his clients.

    Oh Yeong-su as Oh Il-name (No. 001)

    An elderly man with a brain tumor prefers playing the Game to waiting to die on the outside.

    Hyeon Jung as Kang Sae-beak (No. 067)

    North Korean defector enters the Game to pay for a broker that can find and retrieve her surviving family members from the country.

    Heo Sung-tea as Jang Deok-su (No. 101)

    A gangster enters the Game to settle his massive gambling debts.

    Anupam Tripathi as Abdul Ali (No. 199)

    A foreign worker from Pakistan enters the Game to provide for his young family after his employer refuses to pay him for months.

    Kim Joo-young as Han Mi-nyao (No. 212)

    A mysterious and manipulative woman who claims to be a poor single mother.[8]

    Supporting characters

    Yoo Sung-joo as Byeong-gi (No. 111)

    A doctor secretly works with a group of corrupt guards trafficking dead participants’ organs in exchange for information on upcoming games.

    Lee Yoo-mi as Ji-Yeong (No. 240)

    A young woman was just released from prison after killing her abusive father.

    Kim Si-Hyun as No. 244

    A pastor who finds his faith again in the Game.

    Minor characters

    Lee Sang-hee as No. 017

    A glass-maker with more than 30 years’ experience.

    Kim Yun-tea as No. 069

    A player who joins the Game with his wife, No. 070

    Lee Ji-ha as No. 070

    A player who joins the game with her husband, No. 069

    Kwak Ja-young as No. 278

    A player who joins Deok-sun’s group and acts as his henchman.

    Chris Chan / Chris Lag hit[9] as No. 276

    A player who joins Seong Gi-Hun’s group on the Tug of War round.

    Game staff

    Gong Yoo is a salesman who recruits participants for the Game (Special appearance, Episodes 1 and 9)[10]

    Lee Byung-Hun as The Front Man (Special appearance, Episodes 8–9)

    Civilians

    Main characters

    Wi Ha-joon as Hwang Jun-ho[11]

    A police officer sneaks into the Game to find his missing brother.

    Supporting characters

    Kim Young-ok as Gi-Hun’s mother

    Cho Ah-in as Seong Ga-Yeong, Gi-Hun’s daughter

    Kang Mal-gum as Gi-Hun’s ex-wife and Ga-Yeong’s mother

    Park Hye-jin as Sang-woo’s mother

    Park Si-wan as Kang Cheol, Sae-book’s brother

    English cast (dubbing)

    Greg Chun as Seong Gi-Hun

    Stephen Fu as Cho Sang-woo

    Paul Nakache as Jang Deok-su

    Hideo Kimura as Oh Il-name

    Vivian Lu as Kang Sae-beak

    Rama Valéry as Abdul Ali

    Tom Choi as Front Man

    Donald Chang as Hwang Jun-ho

    Stephanie Komura as Han Mi-nyao

    Yuki Luna as Ji-yeong

    Cosmos’s Commentary:

     

     

    Move to Heaven is a heart-wrenching drama about a “Rain man” like character who worked with his father in a trauma clean-up business cleaning up after the recently deceased.  His father dies and his father’s deadbeat brother shows up as his guardian.

     

    Move to Heaven (Korean: 무브 투 헤븐: 나는 유품정리사입니다; RR: Mubeen to hereon: Naneun yupumjeongnisaimnida) is a South Korean streaming television series directed by Kim Sung-ho and written by Yoon Ji-rye on. It is an original Netflix series, starring Lee Je-hoonTang Joon-sangJi Jin-heeLee Jae-Wook, and Hong Seung-hee. The series follows Geu-ru (Tang Joon-sang), a young man with Asperger syndrome, and Sang-gu (Lee Je-hoon), his guardian. Working as trauma cleaners, they uncover untold stories.[1][2] The series was released worldwide by Netflix on May 14, 2021.[3]

     

     

     

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