movies list

movie Journal 2018

Purpose: Movie List

 

Keep daily track of all movies watched, including title, main actors, and plot synopsis and mini review, include in daily journal and copy to Movie list.  Use in conjunction with book read list to keep track of books and movies read and watched.  Also plays attended and TV movie events.

 

Also note when something is well written or produced and lesions I can learn for my own writing projects.  This year watch more Korean movies and TV and occasional Spanish or Bollywood movies as well as usual mix of SF, Thrillers, and comedies. Diversity the list a bit.

 

Part one due to length of file

 

 

List

 

  1. Once Upon a Time ABC mini-series a
  2. Taken Earth c
  3. Alice Through the Looking Glass b
  4. The Vault c too scary a movie
  5. GORA Turkish SF comedy c
  6. Pirates of the Caribbean Dead Men Tell No Tales b
  7. Cowboys Vs Dinosaurs b
  8. Enterprise complete season
  9. Frequency series
  10. Coverdale Paradox
  11. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (on plane)
  12. Kong Island of Skulls (on plane)
  13. GeoStorm (on plane)
  14. Lost and Found YS
  15. Beatriz at Dinner YSS
  16. The Expanse Netflix Original
  17. Discovery Netflix
  18. Drone Wars YS
  19. Prometheus Trap YS
  20. Blackway YS
  21. The Mermaid YS
  22. The Great Wall YS
  23. Gold
  24. King Arthur
  25. The Legend of Zoro
  26. Jumper

 

 

Plot

 

Prometheus Trap

movie data
German title Prometheus Trap
original title Prometheus Trap
production country United States
original language English
Publishing year 2012
length 89 minutes
Age rating FSK 12 [1]
Rod
direction Andrew Bellware
script Steven J. Niles
production Rebecca Kush ,
Laura Schlachtmeyer
cut Rebecca Kush
Occupation
·         Michael Shattner : Finn

·         Rebecca Kush : Haskin

·         Andrew J. Langton : Rhodes

·         James Edward Becton : Cornell

·         Kate Britton : Trent

·         Sarah-Doe Osborn : Artemis

Prometheus Trap is an American low-budget – science fiction film from the year 2012 . Directed by Andrew Bellware , the script was written by Steven J. Niles . The film is about the crew of two spaceships that enter a time warp during an interstellar war.

Table of Contents

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Action [ edit Edit ]

The two-headed crew of the spaceship Venon is woken up by ship’s drift Finn from deep sleep; they are to recover the damaged spaceship Prometheus, which transports a decisive weapon in the bitter war between Earth and the Alliance of Colony Worlds. In the alliance ship Prometheus, the three-member crew of the Venon finds the bodies of six of the eight crew members as well as the ship’s droid Artemis, which behaves strangely; she anticipates the sentences of the boarded crew of the Venon, so to speak. Finn should try to get something out of Artemis; Captain Haskin and her assistant discover two survivors in deep sleep. There are indications that there is a saboteur on board. Everything seems to point to the ship’s droid; the earth-born mechanic of Prometheus, Trent,

The plot then begins again with the arrival of the Venon crew on the Prometheus. But only the two androids have a memory of what happened before; Artemis seems to remember well and has resigned himself to fate; Finn always remembers fragments and wants to change the course of time, even against Artemis’s fatalism.

Criticism [ edit Edit ]

Although the film is often criticized for the lack of special effects and various inconsistencies in the script, he was able to attract an interested, if not enthusiastic audience. [2]

The film service says Prometheus Trap is a “reasonably priced Star War game – at school-theater level, using the darkness in space” to conceal its cheap effects. ” [3]

Web links

 

Certificate: PG  Rating: 3

Synopsis

While spending the summer with their uncle (Jason Patric) on a remote island, teenager Andy (Justin Kelly) and his brother Mark (Benjamin Stockham) learn that their eccentric grandfather left behind a vast fortune. But to find it, they must embark on an elaborate treasure hunt that will take them into the island’s deepest and darkest corners. Suspense and mystery abound in a family adventure made in the finest tradition of The Hardy Boys.

 

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Burn Country
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ian Olds
Produced by Jennifer Glynn
Caroline von Kuhn
Screenplay by Ian Olds
Paul Felten
Starring James Franco
Melissa Leo
Rachel Brosnahan
Dominic Rains
Thomas Jay Ryan
James Oliver Wheatley
Music by Jim McHugh
Cinematography Adam Newport-Berra
Edited by Scott Cummings
Joe Murphy
Ian Olds
Production
company
ACE Productions
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Samuel Goldwyn Films
Release date ·         April 16, 2016 (Tribeca Film Festival)

·         December 9, 2016 (United States)

Running time 102 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English

Burn Country is a 2016 American drama film directed by Ian Olds and written by Ian Olds and Paul Felten. The film stars James FrancoMelissa LeoRachel BrosnahanDominic RainsThomas Jay Ryan and James Oliver Wheatley. The film was released on December 9, 2016, by Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films.

Contents

[hide]

Cast[edit]

Release[edit]

The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 16, 2016.[1][2] The film was released on December 9, 2016, by Orion Picturesand Samuel Goldwyn Films.[3]

 Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valerian and the City
of a Thousand Planets
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Luc Besson
Produced by ·         Luc Besson

·         Virginie Besson-Silla

Screenplay by Luc Besson
Based on Valérian and Laureline
by Pierre Christin
Jean-Claude Mézières
Starring ·         Dane DeHaan

·         Cara Delevingne

·         Clive Owen

·         Rihanna

·         Ethan Hawke

·         Herbie Hancock

·         Kris Wu

·         Rutger Hauer

Music by Alexandre Desplat[1]
Cinematography Thierry Arbogast
Edited by Julien Rey
Production
company
·         EuropaCorp[2]

·         TF1 Films Production

·         Fundamental Films

·         BNP Paribas

·         Orange Studio

·         Novo Pictures

·         River Road Entertainment

·         Belga Films Fund

Distributed by ·         EuropaCorp Distribution
(France)

·         STXfilms
(United States)

Release date ·         17 July 2017 (Grauman’s Chinese Theatre)

·         21 July 2017 (United States)

·         26 July 2017 (France)

Running time 137 minutes[3]
Country France
China
United States
Belgium[4]
Language English
Budget ·         €197 million (gross)[5]
(~$209 million)[6]

·         $177–205 million (net)[6][7][8]

Box office $225.9 million[9]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (FrenchValérian et la Cité des mille planètes) is a 2017 English-language 3D space opera film[10] written and directed by Luc Besson, and co-produced by Besson and his wife, Virginie Besson-Silla. The film is based on the French science fiction comics series Valérian and Laureline, written by Pierre Christin and illustrated by Jean-Claude Mézières. It stars Dane DeHaan as Valerian and Cara Delevingne as Laureline, with Clive OwenRihannaEthan HawkeHerbie HancockKris Wu and Rutger Hauer in supporting roles. Besson independently crowd-sourced and personally funded Valerian. With a production budget of around $180 million, it is both the most expensive non-American and independent film ever made.[11]

Valerian was released by STXfilms on 21 July 2017 in the United States, and in France on 26 July, by EuropaCorp.[12][13] It received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized the plot and some of the casting, but praised the visuals. It grossed $225 million worldwide,[14] but due to its high production and advertising costs, was considered a commercial failure.[15][16]

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

In the 28th century, the former International Space Station has reached critical mass, making it too dangerous to keep in Low Earth Orbit. Relocated to deep space, it became Alpha, a space-traveling city inhabited by millions of creatures from thousands of planets. A special police division is created to preserve peace through the galaxy, including happy-go-lucky Major Valerian and his partner, no-nonsense Sergeant Laureline.

En route to a mission, Valerian dreams of a planet where a low-tech humanoid race lives peacefully. They fish for pearls containing enormous amounts of energy, and use small animals to replicate them. Wreckage begins plummeting from the sky, followed by an apocalyptic explosion. Moments before her death a young princess manages to send out a telepathic signal.

Shaken, Valerian awakes. After an analysis reveals he might have received a signal from across time and space, he learns that his mission is to retrieve a “Mül converter”, so-called for being able to replicate anything it eats. It is the last of its kind, and currently in the hands of black market dealer Igon Siruss. Before setting out, Valerian asks Laureline to marry him, but she brushes him off, due to his many affairs with female colleagues and his aversion to commitment.

Travelling to a massive extra-dimensional bazaar called Big Market, Valerian disrupts a meeting between Igon and two hooded figures who look like the humanoids from his vision. They also seek the converter, which is revealed to be one of the small animals he saw in his vision. Valerian and Laureline recover the converter, and he surreptitiously steals one of the pearls. Aboard their ship, he learns that Mül was destroyed 30 years earlier, and all information about it is classified.

They return to Alpha, where their superior, frosty Commander Arün Filitt, informs them the center of the station has been infected by an unknown force, rendering it highly toxic. Troops sent into the area have not returned, and the infection is growing. Laureline and Valerian are assigned to protect the commander during an interstation summit to discuss the crisis. Against the Commander’s wishes, Laureline maintains possession of the converter.

During the summit, the humanoids suddenly attack, incapacitating everyone before kidnapping Filitt. Valerian chases the kidnappers to the infected area and crashes his vehicle. Evading arrest for insubordination, Laureline enlists the help of some aliens to track Valerian, and finds him unconscious at the edge of the infected zone. She wakes him, but is kidnapped by a primitive imperial tribe emigrated from planet Goara[17] called “Boulan Bathors” that lives nearby. Valerian infiltrates the tribe’s territory with the help of a shape-shifting dancer, Bubble. They save Laureline and escape, but Bubble is mortally wounded. As she dies, she convinces Valerian to never give up on his feelings for Laureline.

Valerian and Laureline venture further into the infected area, realizing it is actually not toxic and contains some wrecks of antique spacecraft. They reach a large shielded hall where they find the humanoids, known as Pearls, with an unconscious Filitt. Their leader, Emperor Haban Limaï, explains that his people lived peacefully on Mül until a battle broke out in orbit between the human government’s fleet and another species. The human commander, Filitt, ordered the use of a doomsday weapon that annihilated both the enemy and the planet. Upon dying, Princess Lihö-Minaa transferred her soul into Valerian’s body. A small group of survivors took shelter in a crashed human spaceship. They managed to repair it, and learned of the humans’ technology and history. They eventually came to Alpha, where they assimilated more knowledge and built a ship that could recreate their former home. They needed only the converter and the pearl to launch the ship. Filitt admits his role in the genocide, but argues that it was necessary to end the war, and the cover-up to prevent the humans from being expelled from Alpha. Valerian and Laureline disagree, stating that the commander has only been trying to save himself from the consequences for his actions, before Valerian knocks him out again.

Valerian hands over the pearl he stole, and Laureline convinces him to return the converter too, ignoring procedures. While the Pearls’ spacecraft prepares for takeoff to no more bother the other species in Alpha, Filitt’s pre-programmed robot K-Tron soldiers attack the Pearls, the government soldiers who were sent to assist Valerian, and their support staff, but are ultimately defeated. The spacecraft departs and Filitt is arrested. Valerian and Laureline are left adrift onboard a still working Apollo Command/Service Module, which is identified by radio technicians as “Destiny 2005“, and Laureline finally accepts Valerian’s marriage proposal as they wait for rescue.

Cast[edit]

DelevingneDeHaan and Besson at the San Diego Comic-Con 2016 presentation of Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, at Camp Conival

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Although Luc Besson loved the Valerian comics growing up, he did not seriously consider adapting them into a movie until he was working on The Fifth Element. During development, Besson had tapped Valerian illustrator Jean-Claude Mézières to work on the film, who asked Besson, “Why are you doing this shitty film? Why you don’t do Valerian?”[22] At the time, Besson felt that making the film was “impossible” given the vast monster-to-human ratio.[22] The release of Avatar served as both a blessing and a curse for Besson; he has said, “technically, I could see that we can do everything now. The film proved that imagination is the only limit.” However, he also felt that “James Cameron pushed all the levels so high,” which made him believe that his script was not good enough, so he rewrote it.[22] Ultimately, the storyboarding for the film took seven months.[23]

The project was first publicly reported in 2012.[24] The two principal stars, Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne, were announced in May 2015.[25] On 19 August 2015, Clive Owensigned on to play Commander Arün Filitt in the film.[26] The budget, €197 million, is by far the largest ever assembled for a French film. Previously, Asterix at the Olympic Games was the most expensive, at €78 million, just ahead of Besson’s The Fifth Element (€75 million).[27] By the end of August 2015, Besson said in an RTL radio interview that shooting the film in France was too expensive. Because it was filmed in a foreign language (English), Besson was unable to benefit from tax credits, despite preferring to produce the film in France and create jobs for 1,200 crew members.[27][28] The criteria to obtain these tax credits were then adapted accordingly. In May 2015, it was announced Fundamental Films would invest US$50 million in the film.[29]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography on the film began on 5 January 2016 in seven sound stages dedicated to the film at the Cité du cinéma, in Saint-Denis, north of Paris.[23][30] In total, there are 2,734 visual effect shots.[31]

Marketing[edit]

The trailer featured the Beatles song “Because“, which marked the first time a Beatles master recording was featured in a film advertisement.[32]

Release[edit]

The first teaser for Valerian was released on 10 November 2016.[33] The teaser depicts Marmakas, Entertainers, Bagoulins, and Shingouz, who all appear in Ambassador of the Shadows. A special exclusive preview of Valerian was shown prior to the Fathom Events 4K restoration showing of The Fifth Element on 14 May and 17 May.[34][35]

Valerian was released in Israel on 20 July 2017,[36] on 21 July in the United States, on 26 July in France.[37] and on 2 August in the UK [38] Lionsgate handles the film’s release in the United Kingdom and Ireland,[39] and STX Entertainment distributes the film in the United States.[40] The film was released on 25 August 2017 in China.[41]

Home media[edit]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets was released digitally on November 7, 2017, and on Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray and DVD on November 21, 2017.[42][43]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets grossed $40.5 million in the United States and Canada and $184.7 million internationally (including $36.8 million in France), for a worldwide total of $225.2 million.[9] With a production budget around $180 million, the film would have needed to gross $400 million worldwide in order to break even and justify a sequel.[11]

In North America, Valerian opened alongside Dunkirk and Girls Trip, and was initially projected to gross $20–25 million from 3,553 theaters, although some insiders believed it would open in the teens.[14][44] It made $6.5 million on its first day, including $1.7 million from Thursday night previews at 2,600 theaters, lowering weekend projections to $16.5 million. The film ended up debuting to $17 million, finishing 5th at the box office, leading Deadline.com to already label the film a domestic box office bomb,[8] and causing a 8.31% fall of the EuropaCorp stock on the following Monday.[16] In its second weekend, the film dropped 62% to $6.4 million, finishing 8th at the box office.[45] In its third and fourth weekends the film made $2.4 million and $901,323, finishing 12th and 17th and dropping another 62% both times.[46]

Outside North America, the film opened in 16 markets alongside the US and made $6.5 million over its opening weekend, including $2.5 million in Germany.[47] In France, the film made $3.72 million (€3.19) on its first day, the second-best opening day of 2017 there behind Despicable Me 3.[48] In China, the film made $9.9 million on its first day from 78,000 screens, becoming the first film to displace Wolf Warriors 2 at the country’s box office.[49] It went on to open to $29 million, topping the box office.[50] The largest territory for the film was China, with US$62.1 million.[9]

Critical response[edit]

Valerian received mixed reviews from critics, who praised its visuals while criticizing the plot and some of the casting.[14] On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 49% based on 237 reviews, with an average rating of 5.5/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets uses sheer kinetic energy and visual thrills to overcome narrative obstacles and offer a viewing experience whose surreal pleasures often outweigh its flaws.”[51] On Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating to reviews, the film has a score of 51 out of 100, based on reviews from 45 critics, indicating “mixed or average reviews”.[52] On French entertainment information website AlloCiné, the film has an average grade of 3.0/5, based on 31 critics.[53] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B–” on an A+ to F scale.[8]

David Ehrlich of IndieWire gave the film a grade of B-, praising how “unapologetically idiosyncratic” the film is, while also saying “the vividness of this place only underscores the lifelessness of the people leading us through it …. There are 394 million stories on the City of a Thousand Planets, and Valerian’s might be the only one we’ve seen before. Still, any excuse to visit this place is one worth taking.”[54] Peter Sciretta of /Film touted the first half of Valerian as “unpredictable and bonkers insane”, while calling the second half more formulaic and “far less exciting”, though he still encouraged seeing the film in 3D “on the biggest screen possible”.[55] Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of The A.V. Club wrote that it was “rare […] to see a film this extravagant that also feels, for better or worse, like the work of a single personality. The longer action scenes may not always rank with Besson’s early ’90s highlights […] or the mania of the more recent Lucy, but there isn’t a moment in this ludicrous, lushly self-indulgent movie that doesn’t feel like its creator is having the time of his life.”[56]

Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave a negative review, saying: “The Razzies don’t need to wait until the end of the year to anoint a winner for 2017 … Hollywood studio chiefs can breathe easy that, this time, at least, they’ll escape blame for making a giant summer franchise picture that nobody wants to see, since this one’s a French import.”[57] A. O. Scott of The New York Times was also less than happy with the film, writing the effort “feels as if it were made up on the spot, by someone so delighted by the gaudy genre packaging at his disposal that he lost track of what was supposed to be inside.”[58]

Possible sequel[edit]

Despite the film being a disappointment at the box office, director Luc Besson claims a sequel is still possible due to positive fan reaction.[59]

 

Movie Two  Kong Skull Island

 

Kong: Skull Island

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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For the ride at Islands of Adventure, see Skull Island: Reign of Kong.

Kong: Skull Island
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts
Produced by
Screenplay by
Story by
Based on King Kong
by Merian C. Cooper
Edgar Wallace
Starring
Music by Henry Jackman
Cinematography Larry Fong
Edited by Richard Pearson
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date
Running time 118 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $185 million[2]
Box office $566.7 million[3]

Kong: Skull Island is a 2017 American monster film directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts and written by Dan GilroyMax Borenstein, and Derek Connolly from a story by John Gatins. The film is a reboot of the King Kong franchise and serves as the second film in Legendary‘s MonsterVerse. The film stars an ensemble cast consisting of Tom HiddlestonSamuel L. JacksonJohn GoodmanBrie LarsonJing TianToby KebbellJohn OrtizCorey HawkinsJason MitchellShea WhighamThomas MannTerry Notary, and John C. Reilly. Set in 1973, the film follows a team of scientists and a US Army unit recently withdrawn from the Vietnam War who travel to an uncharted island in the Pacific and encounter terrifying creatures and the mighty Kong.

Principal photography took place from October 2015 to March 2016 in Hawaii and various locations around VietnamKong: Skull Island premiered on February 28, 2017, in London and was released in the United States on March 10, 2017, in 2D, 3D, IMAX 3D, in Dolby Cinemas and in 70mm. The film was a critical and commercial success,[4][5] grossing over $566 million worldwide against its $185 million budget. The film received a nomination for Best Visual Effects at the 90th Academy Awards. A crossover sequel, Godzilla vs. Kong, is set for release on May 22, 2020.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

In 1944, in the midst of World War II, two fighter pilots – American pilot Hank Marlow and Japanese pilot Gunpei Ikari – parachute onto an island in the South Pacific after a dogfight and engage in close combat, but the fight is interrupted by a giant ape that appears.

Twenty-nine years later, in 1973, U.S. government agent Bill Randa hires former British Special Air Service Captain James Conrad, a skilled tracker, to guide an expedition to map out a recently discovered island known as Skull Island. Their military escort is the Sky Devils, a US Army helicopter squadron newly returned from the Vietnam War and led by Lieutenant Colonel Preston Packard and his subordinates, Major Jack Chapman and Captain Earl Cole. The group is joined by pacifist photojournalist Mason Weaver, who believes the expedition is a secret military operation. Upon arrival at Skull Island, Packard’s men begin dropping explosives developed by seismologist Houston Brooks to map out the island. However, the air unit is attacked by the same giant ape from 1944, who kills a number of military personnel and scatters the survivors across the island.

Packard regroups with some of the scattered survivors, including his door gunner Reles, pilot Glenn Mills, Cole, Landsat employee Steve Woodward, and Randa. After being confronted by Packard, Randa reveals his affiliation to the secret government organization Monarch, and using the expedition to prove the existence of monsters and determine their threat to humanity. Packard’s group begins making their way to Chapman, whose helicopter crash-landed elsewhere, while the other group of survivors (Conrad, Weaver, Brooks, biologist San Lin, soldier Reg Slivko, and Landsat employee Victor Nieves) try to get to a rendezvous point to meet a resupply team arriving in three days’ time, as all the survivors have various encounters with the island’s creatures. Conrad’s group encounter the local Iwi natives and an older Marlow. He reveals that the ape is Kong, the island’s guardian, worshiped as a god by the natives for protecting them from many predators, including reptilian underground monsters dubbed “Skullcrawlers”. He informs them that Kong attacked and destroyed the air unit because their seismology explosives brought Skullcrawlers to the surface; the Skullcrawlers are responsible for killing Kong’s ancestors, leaving him as the last of his kind, although he is still growing. Marlow also tells them that he and Ikari became friends, but Ikari was killed by a Skullcrawler some time ago.

Chapman is ambushed and eaten by a Skullcrawler, while Conrad’s group helps Marlow complete a boat built from parts scavenged from Marlow and Ikari’s downed planes. They ride the boat down the river, and manage to secure communication with Packard’s group, but the boat is attacked by pterosaur-like creatures which kill Nieves. They regroup with Packard, who insists on searching for Chapman, though his true objective is to find and kill Kong, who he perceives as an enemy due to killing his men.

Marlow leads the two groups to a mass grave littered with the bones of Kong’s kin. There, a Skullcrawler attacks the group, killing Randa and many soldiers before dying in a flammable gas explosion triggered by Weaver. Learning about Chapman’s death, (when the Skullcrawler vomits Chapman’s skull and dogtags) a vengeful Packard blames Kong for the deaths of his men and becomes even more determined to kill him. The two groups part ways, with Packard’s group laying a trap for Kong at a nearby lake, while the non-military personnel head back to the boat. While scouting the path ahead, Conrad and Weaver encounter Kong up-close and, seeing his true benevolent nature, they resolve to save him.

As Conrad and Weaver encounter Kong, Packard’s group uses the remaining seismic explosives to lure him in. Kong charges to the lake, where they incapacitate him with ignited napalm, though Woodward is killed. Conrad, Weaver and Marlow arrive and persuade the other soldiers to spare Kong, but Packard refuses to stand down. A massive Skullcrawler emerges from the lake and Packard is crushed to death by a recovering Kong. The Skullcrawler overpowers Kong and chases the humans. Cole is killed in a failed suicide bomb attempt to kill it, but Kong returns to rescue the others and battle the beast, and is aided by the survivors. Weaver is knocked into the marsh during the fight but Kong saves her from drowning. The Skullcrawler then tries to kill Kong and eat Weaver, but Kong successfully kills it by ripping out its innards, and allows the survivors to leave the island.

During the credits, Marlow is shown returning home, reuniting with his wife, meeting his son for the first time, and watching a Chicago Cubs game on television.

In a post-credits scene, Conrad and Weaver are detained by Monarch. They are informed by Brooks and San that Skull Island is just the beginning and that Kong is not the only monster king to roam the world. As proof, they are shown archive footage of cave paintings depicting the monsters GodzillaRodanMothraKing Ghidorah, and finally a battle between Godzilla and King Ghidorah. And as the film cuts to black, the sound of Godzilla’s roar is heard.

Cast[edit]

  • Tom Hiddleston as James Conrad, a former British Special Air Service Captain who served in the Vietnam War with the Special Air Service Regiment, hired as a hunter-tracker for the expedition by Randa.[6] Hiddleston described his character as a man who holds “no political allegiance in the conflict” but “understands conflict”, further stating, “He’s a former soldier who has been formed by an understanding of war, but his specific skill set is something that’s attached to the power of nature; and I think that’s something people haven’t seen in a long time”.[7]
  • Samuel L. Jackson as Preston Packard, a United States Army Lieutenant Colonel and leader of the Sky Devils helicopter squadron, assigned to escort the group of explorers on the expedition. Jackson compares his character to Captain Ahab from Moby-Dick, stating, “He does have to exact some measure of revenge for the people he’s lost. That’s just the nature of how we operate—eye for an eye!”.[7]
  • John Goodman as William “Bill” Randa, a senior official in the government organization Monarch, who is in charge of the expedition.
  • Brie Larson as Mason Weaver, a photojournalist and peace activist. Larson stated that her character has her “own sort of motive” as to why she joined the expedition: “That’s the interesting thing about this movie. It’s a group of misfits that are all coming from different angles looking at the same thing. You get to see how many different views in regards to nature and how we should handle it are dealt with from many different perspectives”.[7] Larson further added that Weaver has an “interest and respect for nature” and “Through that she has a closer, more loving, and intimate relationship with Kong”.[7]
  • Corey Hawkins as Houston Brooks, a geologist and Yale University graduate, recruited for the expedition by Monarch for his groundbreaking theories on seismology.[8]
  • Toby Kebbell as Jack Chapman, a United States Army major and Sea Stallion helicopter pilot who is Packard’s right hand man.[8]
  • John Ortiz as Victor Nieves, a senior Landsat official on the expedition.
  • Jing Tian as San Lin, a biologist working for Monarch. According to Vogt-Roberts and Borenstein, her role was originally larger but had been reduced. Alison de Souza of the Straits Times wrote that in the final film Jing Tian’s role would be described in Chinese as a “hua ping” (花瓶), meaning a vase, which refers to insignificant roles, and that she “hardly does or says a thing.”[9]
  • Jason Mitchell as Glenn Mills, a warrant officer and helicopter pilot of the Sky Devils and close friend of Cole.
  • Shea Whigham as Earl Cole, a seasoned Captain of the Sky Devils who wields an AK-47 instead of an M16 and close friend of Mills.
  • Thomas Mann as Reg Slivko, a warrant officer of the Sky Devils, known for carrying a portable record player.
  • Terry Notary and Toby Kebbell[10] as King Kong (motion capture performance), a 104-foot-tall ape who is worshiped as the king and god on Skull Island by the Iwi natives.[11] Notary stated that this Kong is an adolescent and he tried to play Kong like a “14 year old that’s trapped in the life of an adult”, stating that it took three days to film the motion capture scenes.[12] In addition to playing Chapman, Toby Kebbell also provided some facial references for Kong, stating, “I gave some facial reference — certain subtleties, certain looks. Terry and I worked on stuff together and created what Kong needed. I was just there as backup for pieces that Terry really wanted to get details on. It’s a real honor to be asked by someone who’s a great performer, to come and help support their performance.”[13]
  • John C. Reilly as Hank Marlow, a U.S. Army Air Forces lieutenant of the 45th Pursuit Squadron who has been stranded for nearly 29 years on Skull Island since World War II. He knows the creatures of the island, and is a friend of the Iwi natives. Will Brittain portrays a young Hank Marlow, and also plays Marlow’s son.

Additionally, Eugene Cordero appears as Reles, a warrant officer of the Sky Devils and Packard’s door gunnerMarc Evan Jackson portrays Steve Woodward, a Landsat employee on the expedition; Richard Jenkins portrays Senator Al Willis, a politician who reluctantly funds the expedition; and Miyavi portrays Gunpei Ikari, a Japanese World War II pilot who crash-lands on Skull Island alongside Marlow.

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Initially announced by Legendary Pictures at the 2014 San Diego Comic-ConUniversal Pictures was to be the distributor.[14] Legendary then moved the project to Warner Bros. in order to develop a crossover film featuring King Kong and Godzilla.[15][16][17]

Legendary offered Joe Cornish the job of directing the film,[18] while Peter Jackson, who directed the 2005 version of King Kong, suggested Guillermo del Toro, who Legendary worked with on Pacific Rimand Crimson Peak.[19] In September 2014, the studio announced that Jordan Vogt-Roberts would direct the film.[20]

The script saw a number of screenwriters attached before filming. Seeking the continuity between the King Kong and Godzilla worlds, Max Borenstein (writer of 2014’s Godzilla) wrote the first draft, while John Gatins was hired to write the second draft.[21] Borenstein’s initial influence was Apocalypse Now, revealing, “What popped into my head for the paradigm of the movie was Apocalypse Now. That’s obviously a war movie, but I liked the idea of people moving upriver to face a misunderstood force that they think of as a villain, but ultimately they come to realize is much more complicated.”[22] It was later revealed that Dan Gilroy had also collaborated on the Borenstein and Gatins draft.[23] On August 18, 2015, it was confirmed that Derek Connolly was also doing script rewrites.[24] Borenstein worked a final pass on the screenplay before shooting began, and credited the screenplay to all of the writers, saying, “It was definitely collaborative in terms of what’s on the screen, though none of us worked together. There are pieces of my work in there as well as the work of the other two writers and John Gatins, who was credited for story. Everybody had a really good hand in it.”[22]

In April 2016, artist Joe DeVito sued producers of the film for using elements of his Skull Island universe, which he claimed that he created and the producers used without his permission.[25]

Creature design[edit]

Kong as designed for Kong: Skull Island

Director Vogt-Roberts stated that he wanted Kong to look simple and iconic enough that a third grader could draw him, and the image would still be recognizable.[26] Vogt-Roberts also wanted Kong to feel like a “lonely god, he was a morose figure, lumbering around this island,” and took the design back to the 1933 incarnation, where Kong was presented as a “bipedal creature that walks in an upright position.”[26] Vogt-Roberts additionally stated, “If anything, our Kong is meant to be a throwback to the ’33 version. [Kong] was a movie monster, so we worked really hard to take some of the elements of the ’33 version, some of those exaggerated features, some of those cartoonish and iconic qualities, and then make them their own…We created something that to some degree served as a throwback to the inspiration for what started all of this, but then also [had] it be a fully unique and different creature that — I would like to think — is fully contained and identifiable as the 2017 version of King Kong. I think there are very modern elements to him, yet hopefully he feels very timeless at the same time.”[26]

Hayao Miyazaki‘s Princess Mononoke helped influence the design and approach of the monsters, Vogt-Roberts stated, “Miyazaki[‘s] Princess Mononoke was actually a big reference in the way that the spirit creatures sort of have their own domains and fit within that. So a big thing [was] trying to design creatures that felt realistic and could exist in an ecosystem that feels sort of wild and out there, and then also design things that simultaneously felt beautiful and horrifying at the same time.”[7] However, biophysical analysis of Kong and other creatures concludes that although biophysically they are viable, the ecosystem of the island could not support them.[27]

The two-armed pit lizard from the 1933 King Kong film was used as a reference for the Skullcrawlers. They were also inspired by a number of other cinematic creatures; Vogt-Roberts stated, “That creature, beyond being a reference to a creature from the 1933 film, is also this crazy fusion of all of the influences throughout my life – like the first angel from Evangelion, and No-Face from Spirited Away, and Cubone from Pokémon.”[28]

Casting[edit]

The cast and director of Kong: Skull Island at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con to promote the film

At the same time of the announcement of Vogt-Roberts as director, the studio also announced that Tom Hiddleston would play the lead role.[20] For a time both, JK Simmons and Michael Keaton were attached to roles however both left due to scheduling difficulties. .[29][30][31] On July 23, 2015, Brie Larson was cast in the film to play the female lead.[32] On August 5, 2015, it was announced that Corey Hawkins was cast in the film to play a supporting role.[23] On August 6, 2015, Deadline.com reported that the studio was in early talks with Samuel L. Jackson to replace the role which Simmons vacated, while John C. Reilly was being eyed for Keaton’s role, but not offered it yet. Tom Wilkinson was also offered a role in the film.[33]

On August 20, 2015, Toby Kebbell joined the cast of the film, while Jackson and Reilly were confirmed for roles.[34] On August 25, 2015, Jason Mitchell joined the cast, to play a pilot.[35] On September 25, 2015, John Goodman was cast to play Randa, a government official and leader of an expedition, and Thomas Mann was also cast.[36][37] On October 1, 2015, John Ortiz and Shea Whigham were added to the cast in unspecified roles.[38] On October 13, 2015, Eugene Cordero joined the film,[39] and on November 2, 2015, it was announced Will Brittain had joined the cast, portraying a pilot, in one of the last key leads in the film.[40] In May 2016, Toby Kebbell revealed that Terry Notary would portray Kong through motion capture, and that Kebbell provided some guidance for Kong’s motion capture sequences.[8]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography on the film began on October 19, 2015, and concluded on March 18, 2016.[41] Filming took place in the northern portion of Vietnam, including Tràng An, Vân Long and Tam Cốc (Ninh Bình Province), Hạ Long Bay (Quảng Ninh Province), and at the entrance of Tú Làn Caves System (Tân Hoá, Trung Hoá Village, Minh Hoá District Quảng Bình Province), the island of Oahu in Hawaii, and Australia’s Gold Coast. Locations included Honolulu’s Chinatown, and at the Kualoa Ranch and Waikane Valley (Ohulehule Forest Conservancy) on Oahu.[42][43] In mid-January 2016, filming started in Gold CoastQueensland, Australia.[44][45]

Influences[edit]

Vogt-Roberts has cited a number of films that inspired Kong: Skull Island, stating, “If I were going to break it down for people, I’d say you obviously have Apocalypse Now and just the era of ‘70s filmmaking, with films like The Conversation, too. Also Platoon was an inspiration, and the South Korean film The Host as well. The entire Neon Genesis Evangelion series was a big influence.”[28] Vogt-Roberts also cited Princess Mononoke as an influence on the approach and design of the monsters.[7] He cited Sachiel from Neon Genesis Evangelion, Cubone from Pokémon, No-Face from Spirited Away, and a creature from the 1933 King Kong as inspirations for the Skullcrawlers.[28]

Music[edit]

The film’s score was composed by Henry Jackman. To fit the ’70s period of the film, Jackman blended ’70s psychedelic guitars into the score.[46] Regarding the music used in the film, Vogt-Roberts stated, “I wanted to use songs from the Vietnam era and a myriad of hits from the ’70s… this provides a striking dichotomy, sets the tone and gives us great moments of fun.”[46]

Release[edit]

Kong: Skull Island was originally set a release date for November 4, 2016, but in December 2014, the release date was pushed back from its original release date of November 4, 2016 to March 10, 2017. The new release date coincides with the franchise’s 84th anniversary. It was released in 3D and IMAX 3D, as well as in Dolby Vision High Dynamic Range, and Dolby Atmos sound in Dolby Cinemas and presented in 70mm.[47][48] The film premiered at the Cineworld Empire Leicester Square in London on February 28, 2017.[49][50]

Box office[edit]

Kong: Skull Island has grossed $168 million in the United States and Canada and $398.6 million in other territories for a worldwide gross of $566.6 million.[3] Made on a production budget of $185 million, with about $136 million more spent on global marketing costs, the film needed to make at least $450–500 million worldwide in order to break even.[51][52][53]

In the United States and Canada, Kong: Skull Island was projected to gross $40–50 million in its opening weekend, as well as a worldwide debut of $110–135 million.[2][54] The film made $20.2 million on its first day from 3,846 theaters, including $3.7 million it made from Thursday night previews.[55] In total, the film earned a better-than-expected $61 million on its opening weekend, defying the film’s initial projection by 35%.[56][51] In IMAX, it made $7.6 million from 382 theaters, repping 12.5% of the film’s total opening weekend.[56] In its second weekend the film grossed $27.8 million (a drop of 54.4%), finishing second at the box office behind newcomer Beauty and the Beast.[57]

Internationally, the film debuted with $85.1 million from 20,900 screens in 65 markets. It opened in every market except Japan and China. In IMAX, the film scored the fourth-biggest March release with $4.8 million from 672 theaters (the second biggest without China in it).[58] The biggest openings came from the United KingdomIreland ($7.6 million), South Korea ($7.4 million), Russia ($6.2 million), Mexico($5.7 million), France ($4.1 million), Taiwan ($3.6 million), Australia ($3.6 million), Brazil ($3.4 million), Germany ($3.4 million), Malaysia ($2.65 million), India ($2.4 million), Spain ($1.6 million) and Italy ($1.6 million), while in Vietnam (where the film was primarily shot and centered on), it scored the biggest opening of all time there with $2.5 million. This was a week following a huge model of the primate outside the theater caught on fire at the film’s premiere.[51][58] The film would eventually open in China with $71.6 million (its largest international market) and in Japan with $3.5 million, where the film was released as King Kong: Giant God of Skull Island (Kingu Kongu: Dokurotou no Kyoshin).[59] After its overseas run, the film would gross US$398 million internationally.[60]

Critical response[edit]

Kong: Skull Island received generally positive reviews from critics.[61][62] On the film review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 75% based on 313 reviews, with an average rating of 6.5/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Offering exhilarating eye candy, solid acting, and a fast-paced story, Kong: Skull Island earns its spot in the movie monster’s mythos without ever matching up to the classic original.”[63] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 62 out of 100, based on 49 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews”.[64] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B+” on an A+ to F scale.[65]

Michael Phillips of The Chicago Tribune lauded the film, giving it three-and-a-half stars out of four: “I saw little in [Vogt-Roberts’] first feature to indicate the deftness and buoyant spirit he brings to Skull Island. This time, the money’s on the screen, but it bought a really good movie, too.”[66] Mike Ryan of Uproxx gave the film a positive review, noting, “Kong: Skull Island is still a hoot. It was a movie that was not at all on my radar as something I was dying to see and yet I had way too much fun watching it. I just wished it had embraced its craziness just a little bit more. (But, yes, there’s still plenty of crazy to go around.)”[67] Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave the film a positive review as well, stating that “all the requisite elements are served up here in ideal proportion, and the time just flies by, which can rarely be said for films of this nature.”[68] Kyle Anderson of Nerdist News found the film entertaining but flawed, saying, “It’s certainly not a perfect movie, and a lot of the characters feel like sketches more than fully-fledged people, but it roars along enjoyably from start to finish.”[69]

Conversely, Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian awarded the film one out of five stars. In his negative review, he described the movie as a “fantastically muddled and exasperatingly dull quasi-update of the King Kong story.”[70] Matthew Lickona of The San Diego Reader also gave the film one out of five stars, writing: “It’s fun to watch [the monsters] in action, but on the human side, the film is clumsily written, over-cast and underacted, with only frustrated soldier Samuel L. Jackson striking the right tone of crazy amid the chaos.”[71] Chris Klimek of NPR mentions how “Kong is at its mediocre best when it pretends to be a nature documentary about Skull Island’s bizarro flora and fauna,” but lamented how “every time the movie threatens to get interesting, one of its hordes of ersatz, non-animated characters shows up and starts talking again.”[72] Anthony Lane of The New Yorker noted that what the film “yearns to be, is a pop-culture Apocalypse Now, with the human foe removed, the political parable toned down, and the gonzo elements jacked up.”[73] J.R. Jones questioned the film’s setting, saying “this Jurassic Park knockoff takes place neither in the Depression era, which gave us the original King Kong, nor in the present, when satellite photos would surely alert us to the existence of a 100-foot gorilla. Instead—and for no reason I can fathom, except perhaps the classic-rock tunes desired for the soundtrack—the story takes place in 1973, when the Vietnam war is winding down and President Nixon is being driven from office.”[74]

Several critics have commented on Larson’s role in the movie, having recently won an Oscar for Room,[75] with Michael Salfino of The Wall Street Journal remarking that “a starring role in a popcorn movie on the heels of a passion project can open up an actor to ridicule.”[76]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Date of ceremony Category Recipient(s) and nominee(s) Result Ref.
Teen Choice Awards August 13, 2017 Choice Movie: Sci-Fi Nominated
Choice Movie Actor: Sci-Fi Tom Hiddleston
Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi Brie Larson
Annie Award February 3, 2018 Outstanding Achievement for Character Animation in a Live Action Production Jance Rubinchik, Adrian Millington, Alberto Martinez Arce, Kyle Winkelman Nominated
Visual Effects Society Awards February 13, 2018 Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature Jeff White, Tom Peitzman, Stephen RosenbaumScott Benza, Michael Meinardus Pending [77]
Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature Jakub Pistecky, Chris Havreberg, Karin Cooper, Kris Costa for “Kong”
Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature Florent Andorra, Alexis Hall, Raul Essig, Branko Grujcic
Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature Nelson Sepulveda, Aaron Brown, Paolo Acri, Shawn Mason
Academy Awards March 4, 2018 Best Visual Effects Stephen RosenbaumJeff WhiteScott Benza, Michael Meinardus Pending [78]

Home media[edit]

Kong: Skull Island was released on HD Digital on June 20, 2017, and on 4K Ultra HD, 3D Blu-ray, Blu-ray and DVD on July 18, 2017.[79] The film debuted at the top of the NPD VideoScan First Alert sales chart and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc chart for the week ending on July 23, 2017.[80] To date, Kong: Skull Island sold $37.2 million worth of DVD’s in North America.[81]

Sequel[edit]

Main article: MonsterVerse

In September 2015, Legendary moved Kong: Skull Island from Universal to Warner Bros., which sparked media speculation that Godzilla and King Kong will appear in a film together.[82][83] In October 2015, Legendary confirmed that they would unite Godzilla and King Kong in Godzilla vs. Kong, set for a release date of May 29, 2020. Legendary plans to create a shared cinematic franchise “centered around Monarch,” that “brings together Godzilla and Legendary’s King Kong in an ecosystem of other giant super-species, both classic and new.” While Legendary will maintain its home at Universal Pictures, it will continue to collaborate with Warner Bros. for the franchise.[84]

Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts had expressed interest in doing a film about Marlow and Gunpei’s time on the island, stating, “I keep joking that personally I’m more interested in doing a $30 million version of young John C. Reilly on the island. Just some weird, the odd-ball monster comedy with him and Gunpei.”[85]

Godzilla vs. Kong is scheduled to be released on May 29, 2020[86] with Adam Wingard attached to direct the film.[87

 

Movie Three  GeoStorm

Geostorm

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Geostorm
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dean Devlin[1]
Produced by
Written by
  • Dean Devlin
  • Paul Guyot
Starring
Music by Lorne Balfe
Cinematography Roberto Schaefer
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures[2]
Release date
  • October 20, 2017
Running time 109 minutes[3]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $120 million[4]
Box office $217.0 million[4]

Geostorm is a 2017 American disaster film[1] co-written, produced, and directed by Dean Devlin as his feature film directorial debut. The film stars Gerard ButlerJim SturgessEd HarrisAbbie CornishRichard SchiffAlexandra Maria LaraRobert SheehanDaniel WuEugenio Derbez, and Andy García. The plot follows a satellite designer who tries to save the world from a storm of epic proportions caused by malfunctioning climate-controlling satellites.

Principal photography began on October 20, 2014, in New OrleansLouisiana. After poor test screenings, re-shoots took place in December 2016 under executive producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and new director Danny Cannon.[5] The film is the first co-production between Skydance Media and Warner Bros. The film was released by Warner Bros. in the United States on October 20, 2017, in 2D, Real D 3D and IMAX 3D. It grossed $217 million worldwide and received negative reviews, with criticism focused on the “uninspiring” story and “lackluster” visual effects.[6]

Contents

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Plot[edit]

In 2019, following many natural disasters, an international coalition commissions a system of climate-controlling satellites called “Dutch Boy”. After Dutch Boy neutralizes a typhoon, a Senate sub-committee reprimands chief architect Jake Lawson for acting without authorization and replaces him with his brother Max, who works under Secretary of State Leonard Dekkom.

Three years later, as a UN team stationed in Afghanistan comes across a frozen village, Bakchod, an engineer working on the International Climate Space Station (ICSS) steals data from the Afghanistan satellite before being ejected into space. After convincing President Andrew Palma to conduct an investigation, Max convinces Jake to go to the ICSS to investigate. Another satellite increases temperatures in Hong Kong, causing a firenado that nearly kills Max’s college friend Cheng Long, the head of Dutch Boy’s Hong Kong department.

Jake arrives at ICSS to examine the malfunctioning satellites (which are damaged afterwards and their data erased) with station commander Ute Fassbinder and her crew. Back on Earth, Cheng discovers he has lost login access and warns Max of a global cataclysm known as a “Geostorm” if the malfunction continues. Max discovers his login access has also been revoked. Cheng flies to the United States after evading a team of mercenaries.

Outside the ICSS, Jake and Ute retrieve a hard drive which had been ejected along with the satellite engineer. They keep the hard drive secret from the crew, suspecting a traitor, and look for the source of the error but are blocked. Jake reports the findings to Max. The ICSS staff neutralize malfunctioning satellites by deliberately knocking them offline via collisions with replacement satellites. An assailant intentionally causes Cheng’s death in a traffic accident, but not before Cheng tells Max “Zeus”. Max discovers Project Zeus simulates extreme weather patterns to create a Geostorm.

Jake, Ute, and fellow crew member Dussette recover the copied log data from the dead engineer and discover a virus has wiped out everyone’s login access to that satellite. Suspecting Palma is using Dutch Boy as a weapon, Jake tells Max he needs to reboot the system, which requires the kill code, held by the President. Max asks Sarah, his girlfriend and a Secret Service agent, to help him to acquire it.

During the National Democratic Convention, Max discovers Orlando is next in line for a superstorm after Tokyo is struck by a hailstorm and Rio de Janeiro freezes over. He requests Dekkom help secure the kill code from Palma, but Dekkom instead tries to kill Max, unveiling himself as the saboteur. Max escapes and immediately informs Sarah. The two kidnap Palma to protect him from other compromised agents and secure the kill code. They escape from a stadium as a lightning storm destroys it. Amidst the chaos, Max reveals their activities to Palma. After outsmarting Dekkom’s mercenaries, Max and Sarah arrest and confront Dekkom about his intentions: to decimate America’s enemies and the line of succession, and dominate the world.

The ICSS team loses control of all operations as the virus initiates the self-destruct program. As disasters strike the world, Jake realizes software engineer Duncan is responsible. In the ensuing confrontation, Duncan accidentally shoots at the window and ejects himself into space while Jake escapes. As the crew evacuates, Jake stays behind to ensure the reboot completes. Max and Sarah escort the President to Kennedy Space Center, where they learn the kill code cannot stop the self-destruct process.

When Jake fails to unlock a door again, Ute, who stayed behind, opens the door for him. They work together to reboot the system, transferring satellite control to NASA and preventing the Geostorm. The two take shelter in a replacement satellite as the self-destruction sequence completes and send a distress signal. A nearby shuttle piloted by Hernandez picks them up. Six months later, Jake works as the head engineer for a new system of satellites, which is now administered by an international committee.

Cast[edit]

Katheryn Winnick had been cast as Olivia Lawson, Jake’s ex-wife and the mother of Hannah, but during reshoots, her role was recast with Julia Denton.

Production[edit]

The pre-production began on July 7, 2014.[8] With an initial budget of $82 million,[9] principal photography began on October 20, 2014, in New OrleansLouisiana,[10][11] and lasted through February 10, 2015.[11] Filming began on Loyola Avenue on the first day.[12] Some NASA scenes were filmed at NASA Facility in New Orleans in November 2014 and January 2015.[13][14]

After poor test screenings in December 2015, $15 million reshoots were conducted in Louisiana in early December 2016, under new producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and director Danny Cannon. Winnick’s role was recast with Julia Denton during reshoots, while new characters were added into the script.[5]

Marketing[edit]

On October 16, 2017, Warner Bros. released a prank video on its YouTube channel. In the video, a New York taxicab drives into an ice storm affected city block, much to the shock of its passengers.[15]

Release[edit]

The film was originally set for release on March 25, 2016,[16] but in August 2014, Warner cancelled this, and released Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice on that date instead.[17] On December 11, 2014, WB shifted its live-action animated film Jungle Book to 2017 and gave its previous date from March 25, 2016, then October 21, 2016, to Geostorm.[18] In September 2015, the studio again moved back the film from October 21, 2016, to January 13, 2017.[19] In June 2016, the studio announced the release had been moved back from January 13, 2017, to October 20, 2017. The film had an IMAX release.[20]

Box office[edit]

As of December 18, 2017, Geostorm has grossed $33.3 million in the United States and Canada, and $175 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $208.3 million, against a production budget of $120 million.[4]

In North America, the film was released alongside Boo 2! A Madea HalloweenThe Snowman and Only the Brave, and was expected to gross $10–12 million from 3,246 theaters in its opening weekend.[21]After not holding Thursday night preview screenings, the film made $4.2 million on Friday. It went on to debut to $13.3 million, finishing second at the box office.[22] Due to its hefty budget, the film will likely lose about $100 million.[23]

Critical response[edit]

On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 13% based on 60 reviews and an average rating of 3.7/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Lacking impressive visuals, well-written characters, or involving drama, Geostorm aims for epic disaster-movie spectacle but ends up simply being a disaster of a movie.”[24] On Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating to reviews, the film has a weighted average score of 21 out of 100 based on reviews from 21 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[25] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B−” on an A+ to F scale.[22]

Peter Sobczynski of RogerEbert.com gave the film one-and-a-half out of four stars, stating that “the real disappointment about [Geostorm] is that it doesn’t even work as the camp suggested by the trailer…. [T]hey lack the lavish visual pyrotechnics nor the wit or style to make any of the destruction slightly memorable.”[26] Mark Kermode of the Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review radio program stated that the film “takes stupid to a whole new level…. Honestly, and I say this, I think it’s the stupidest film I have ever seen”, emphasizing that “it’s more stupid than Angels and Demons, and that’s not a phrase I thought I’d ever say out loud”.[27]

 

 

The Cloverfield Paradox is a 2018 American science fiction horror film directed by Julius Onah, written by Oren Uziel and Doug Jung, and produced by J. J. Abrams‘s Bad Robot Productions. The film is the third installment in the Cloverfield franchise. It stars Daniel BrühlElizabeth DebickiAksel HennieGugu Mbatha-RawChris O’DowdJohn OrtizDavid Oyelowo, and Zhang Ziyi.

Under distribution by Paramount Pictures, the film had been in development since 2012, and initially had been named God Particle at that time, without being connected to the Cloverfield series. Since then, the film was confirmed to be the third film of the series, but its release had been postponed repeatedly,[2] until its surprise trailer during Super Bowl LII on February 4, 2018, with its release on Netflixoccurring the same day, immediately after the game, within two hours of the first trailer.[3]

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Plot[edit]

In the near future, Earth is suffering from a global energy crisis. The collective space agencies of the world launch the Cloverfield Station to perfect the Shepard particle accelerator, which if successful, would provide an unlimited supply of energy for Earth, but would be far too dangerous to test on Earth, some pundits arguing this would create the “Cloverfield Paradox” and open up portals to other dimensions to let monsters onto Earth. One of the crew includes Ava Hamilton, who frets about leaving her husband Michael for potentially many years; the two have struggled with the death of their children years prior which has left their relationship cold.

The crew are unable to get the accelerator working for about two years, but eventually, they are successful. However, the system overloads, causing a massive power surge on the station. When they restore basic functions, they find that Earth is nowhere to be found, and the station’s gyroscope, necessary for navigation, has gone missing. As the crew assess repairs and try to find out what happened, strange events happen all over the station. Strange noises from behind a wall lead them to find a woman named Jensen who is fused among the wires; they are able to extract her safely. Volkov fears something is under his skin, and suddenly is compelled to craft a gun, but before he can threaten the crew, he convulses and dies, with the station’s colony of worms spilling out of him. While repairing the ship, Mundy’s arm is pulled into the walls; he is rescued but his arm is severed clean off. They later find his arm elsewhere on the station, moving on its own accord. They see the arm trying to write something, leading them to dissect Volkov’s body to find the missing gyroscope. Once installed, they are able to locate Earth on the other side of the Sun, but as they receive transmissions from it, they find out that there, they believe the Cloverfield Station was destroyed during operating the Shepard. After conversing with Jensen, the crew determine they were pulled into an alternate dimension, one in which Hamilton had decided to stay on Earth with Michael and her children, with Jensen having taken her place for the Cloverfield mission; their arrival in this dimension may have caused the destruction of Cloverfield Station in this one. The strange events are all related to parts of Cloverfield Stationtrying to co-exist in the same time. Tam determines that the Shepard was not ventilated enough during its run, causing them to cross dimensions, and gives Schmidt the appropriate changes, but she is killed in a similar freak accident. While the rest of the crew agrees they need to reactivate Shepard without modification as to return them back to their dimension, Hamilton debates about staying in this one as to be with her children.

Meanwhile, on Earth, Michael learns that they have lost communication with Cloverfield Station, and that some major accident has wracked the city, and he sees signs of a giant creature off in the distance. He begins to drive to the hospital to offer his services as a doctor, but stops to help a frightened girl Molly in the ruins of a building. Learning the hospital has been destroyed, he drives Molly to an underground shelter belonging to a friend, and takes care of her wounds.

As the Cloverfield Station crew prepare to re-engage the Shepard device, diverting power from their life support systems, another strange circumstances causes Mundy to be trapped in a strong magnetic field that leads to that section of the station exploding, killing Mundy and leaving Cloverfield Station adrift in two parts connected only by a few support beams, with the accelerators still spinning dangerously. Kiel sacrifices himself to manually disengage the accelerator ring, even though it could have easily been done remotely as described by Hamilton. Hamilton makes plans to take the station’s shuttle to return to the alternate Earth with Jensen while the others continue to activate Shepard to return to their dimension and restart the power supply. However, Jensen turns on them, recovering the gun Volkov made and using it to threaten the crew and kill Monk, believing that this crew killed her own crewmates of Cloverfield Station, and wanting to make sure Shepard stays in this dimension. Hamilton eventually overpowers Jensen, takes the gun, and shoots a window, ejecting Jensen into space. Hamilton decides to return with the crew, but leaves a message to her own self in this dimension with the plans for the Shepard device, but reminding her of the value of her family. Hamilton tends to Schmidt, the only other surviving member of the crew, and they use Shepard to return home, and then make Tam’s modifications to engage Sheppard to provide the power supply as intended. The two then are forced to evacuate via shuttle to return to Earth due to the lack of life support.

Michael is contacted by the control station letting them know they are back, but could not warn them in time about the state of Earth before they evacuated Cloverfield Station. He angrily demands that Hamilton and Schmidt be told not to return to Earth. As the shuttle breaks through the cloud layer, a giant monster rears up past the clouds.

Cast[edit]

Additionally, Simon Pegg and Greg Grunberg provide voice cameos as Radio Voice and Joe respectively.

Production[edit]

The film was first announced in 2012, under the title God Particle. The subsequent closure of Paramount’s InSurge label put the film’s release in jeopardy.[4] The first hints that the film was connected to the Cloverfield brand came when a piece of the viral marketing for 10 Cloverfield Lane included a soundclip that was supposedly from the International Space Station.[5] The script pre-dates the production of that film, however.[6]

In March 2016, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and David Oyelowo were confirmed to be cast in the film.[7] In April, Variety reported that John Krasinski was in early talks to join the film to play one of the astronauts,[8] but had a possible conflict due to a commitment with a television series.[9] In May, Elizabeth Debicki,[9] Daniel Brühl,[10] Chris O’Dowd,[11] Zhang Ziyi,[11] John Ortiz,[12] and Aksel Hennie[12] were announced as members of the cast. Cinematographer Dan Mindel was confirmed to join the film from his résumé.[13]

Filming began on June 10, 2016 and wrapped on September 23, 2016.[12]

Early marketing of the film gave the following premise: “A team of astronauts aboard an international space station find themselves alone after a scientific experiment involving a particle accelerator makes the Earth vanish. When a space shuttle appears, the space station crew must fight for survival following their horrible discovery.”[14]

In January 2018, it was reported that the original plot device of a god particle may have been removed from the story.[6]

Release[edit]

The film was originally scheduled for a February 2017 release but in late 2016 it was moved to October 2017, to give more time for post-production.[15] The film was pulled from Paramount’s release schedule, but an unnamed Cloverfield film was scheduled for release in IMAX that month.[16] In July 2017, it was announced the release had been delayed another three months to February 2018.[17] In January 2018, the release was moved for a third time, to April 20, also announcing that the title God Particle had been dropped for Untitled Cloverfield Sequel, with the implication that this was due to a change in the plot device of the film’s story.[6] That same month, it was revealed that Netflix was in talks to acquire the film from Paramount. Paramount’s chairman Jim Gianopulos felt the film’s budget (which ballooned to over $40 million from an initial $5 million) was too large for the film to be profitable with a traditional theatrical release and that it still needed work done, and “while Abrams expressed an intent to get down to business in post-production, it was too little, too late”.[18]

On February 4, 2018, during Super Bowl LII, Netflix showed a TV spot that announced the film’s title and a surprise release of the film after the game.[3]

 

Cowboys Vrs Dinosaurs

After an accidental explosion at a local mine, dinosaurs emerge from the rubble to terrorize a small western town. Now, a group of gunslingers must defend their home if anyone is going to survive in a battle of cowboys versus dinosaurs.

Director:

Ari Novak

Writers:

Anthony FankhauserRafael Jordan

Stars:

Eric RobertsRib HillisCasey Fitzgerald |See full cast & crew »

 

 

 

Once Upon a Time is an American fantasy drama television series that premiered on October 23, 2011, on ABC. The show follows various fairy-tale characters who were transported to the real world and robbed of their original memories by a powerful curse. The first six seasons were set in the fictitious seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, with Emma Swan as the lead character, while the seventh takes place in a Seattle, Washington neighborhood called Hyperion Heights, with a new main narrative led by an adult Henry Mills.

It borrows elements and characters from the Disney franchise and popular Western literature, folklore, and fairy tales. Once Upon a Time was created by Lost and Tron: Legacy writers Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz.[2] For the first six seasons, the series aired on Sundays at 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT.[3] On May 11, 2017, ABC renewed the series for a 22-episode seventh season, moving to Friday 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT, which premiered on October 6, 2017.[4][5][6]

A spin-off series, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland, consisting of 13 episodes, premiered on October 10, 2013, and concluded on April 3, 2014. It followed the journey of Alice, from Alice in Wonderland. [7]

Contents

[hide]

Series overview[edit]

For the first six seasons, the series originally took place in the fictional seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, in which the residents are actually characters from various fairy tales and other stories that were transported to the real world town and robbed of their original memories by the Evil Queen Regina (Lana Parrilla) who used a powerful curse obtained from Rumplestiltskin (Robert Carlyle). The residents of Storybrooke, where Regina is mayor, have lived an unchanging existence for 28 years, unaware of their own lack of aging. The town’s only hope lies with a bail-bonds person named Emma Swan (Jennifer Morrison), the daughter of Snow White (Ginnifer Goodwin) and Prince Charming (Josh Dallas), who was transported from the Enchanted Forest to the real world via a magic tree as an infant before she could be cursed. As such, she is the only person who can break the curse and restore the characters’ lost memories. She is aided by her son, Henry (Jared S. Gilmore), with whom she was recently reunited after giving him up for adoption upon his birth, and his Once Upon a Time book of fairy tales that holds the key to breaking the curse. Henry is also the adopted son of Regina, providing a source of both conflict and common interest between the two women.

In the seventh season reboot, an adult Henry Mills (Andrew J. West), along with Regina, Captain Hook (Colin O’Donoghue) and Rumplestiltskin, are found years later in the Seattle neighborhood of Hyperion Heights, where characters from a different realm were brought under a new curse. Hoping to restore her family’s memories, Lucy (Alison Fernandez) must convince her parents, Henry and Cinderella (Dania Ramirez), of the true nature of Hyperion Heights, in the midst of emerging dangers involving Lady Tremaine(Gabrielle Anwar) and Mother Gothel (Emma Booth).

Episodes usually have one segment that details the characters’ past lives that, when serialized, adds a piece to the puzzle about the characters and their connection to the events that preceded the curse and its consequences. The other, set in the present day, follows a similar pattern with a different outcome but also offers similar insights.

Season 1 (2011–12)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 1)

The first season premiered on October 23, 2011. The Evil Queen interrupts the wedding of Snow White and Prince Charming to announce that she will cast a curse on everyone that will leave her with the only happy ending. The majority of the characters are transported to the town of Storybrooke, Maine, where they have been stripped of their original memories and identities as fairy tale characters. On her 28th birthday, Emma Swan, the daughter of Snow White and Prince Charming, is brought to Storybrooke by her biological son Henry Mills in the hopes of breaking the curse cast by his adoptive mother, the Evil Queen Regina.

Season 2 (2012–13)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 2)

The second season premiered on September 30, 2012.[8] Despite Emma having broken the curse, the characters are not returned to the fairy tale world, and must deal with their own dual identities. With the introduction of magic into Storybrooke by Mr. Gold, the fates of the two worlds become intertwined, and new threats emerge in the form of Captain Hook (Colin O’Donoghue), Regina’s mother Cora (Barbara Hershey), also known as the Queen of Hearts, and sinister operatives from the real world with an agenda to destroy magic.

Season 3 (2013–14)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 3)

The third season premiered on September 29, 2013. It was split into two volumes, with the first eleven episodes running from September to December 2013, and the later half from March to May 2014. In the first volume, the main characters travel to Neverland to rescue Henry, who has been kidnapped by Peter Pan (Robbie Kay) as part of a plan to obtain the “Heart of the Truest Believer” from him. Their increasing power struggle with Pan continues in Storybrooke, which ultimately results in the complete reversal of the original curse. All the characters are returned to their original worlds, leaving Emma and Henry to escape to New York City. In the second volume, the characters are mysteriously brought back to a recreated Storybrooke with their memories of the previous year removed, and the envious Wicked Witch of the West (Rebecca Mader) from the Land of Oz appears with a plan to change the past. Once again, Emma is needed to save her family.

Season 4 (2014–15)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 4)

The fourth season premiered on September 28, 2014. It was also split into two volumes, with the first eleven episodes running from September to December 2014, and the later half from March to May 2015. A new storyline incorporating elements from Frozen was revealed when the time travel events of the previous season lead to the accidental arrival of Elsa(Georgina Haig) from the Enchanted Forest of the past to present-day Storybrooke. As she searches for her sister Anna (Elizabeth Lail) with the aid of the main characters, they encounter the Snow Queen (Elizabeth Mitchell).[9] Meanwhile, Regina seeks the Author of Henry’s Once Upon a Time book so that she can finally have her happy ending. However, Mr. Gold, with the help of Cruella De Vil (Victoria Smurfit), Maleficent (Kristin Bauer van Straten), and Ursula (Merrin Dungey), has his own plan to rewrite the rules governing the fates of all heroes and villains. Henry and Emma race to restore reality and the truth before the twisted inversion becomes permanent. However, the price leads to the ultimate sacrifice.

Season 5 (2015–16)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 5)

The fifth season was announced on May 7, 2015,[10] and premiered on September 27, 2015. It was once again split into two volumes with the first volume ran from September to December 2015, and the second volume from March to May 2016. The characters embark on a quest to Camelot to find the Sorcerer Merlin (Elliot Knight) in order to free Emma from the powers of an ancient darkness that threatens to destroy everything. To complicate matters, King Arthur (Liam Garrigan) is determined to forever alter the balance between light and darkness using the legendary Excalibur. As history and destiny collide, unsuspected consequences lead the characters to the Underworld where they encounter souls of those with unfinished business and must face Hades (Greg Germann). In an attempt to restore order to the chaos that has culminated, the characters’ dangerous manipulations of magic lead to an exacerbation of the war between light and darkness, with the separation of Regina and her Evil Queen persona, as well as the arrival of Dr. Jekyll (Hank Harris) and Mr. Hyde (Sam Witwer).

Season 6 (2016–17)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 6)

The sixth season was announced on March 3, 2016, and premiered on September 25, 2016. The characters must defend Storybrooke from the combined threat of Mr. Hyde and an unleashed Evil Queen and the mysterious fate of saviors leads to Emma learning about Aladdin (Deniz Akdeniz).[11] The ongoing war between light and darkness ultimately leads to the arrival of the Black Fairy (Jaime Murray) as well as the final battle that was prophesied before the casting of the original curse.

Season 7 (2017)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 7)

In May 2017, the series was renewed for a seventh season consisting of 22 episodes,[12] which marks the beginning of a soft reboot.[13][14][15] Years later, Lucy (Alison Fernandez) arrives in the neighborhood of Hyperion Heights in Seattle, Washington with her Once Upon a Time book to find her father Henry Mills (Andrew J. West) who is needed by his family.[16][17][18] Characters from the New Enchanted Forest[19] were brought to Hyperion Heights under a new curse and are caught in a rising conflict involving Cinderella (Dania Ramirez) and Lady Tremaine (Gabrielle Anwar) whose dangerous history with Mother Gothel (Emma Booth) is also revealed.

Episodes[edit]

See also: List of Once Upon a Time episodes

Season Episodes Originally aired Nielsen ratings
First aired Last aired Viewers
(millions)
Viewers
rank
18–49
rating/share
18-49
rank
1 22 October 23, 2011 May 13, 2012 11.71 28[20] 4.1/10 18[21]
2 22 September 30, 2012 May 12, 2013 10.24 35[22] 3.6/9 18[23]
3 22 September 29, 2013 May 11, 2014 9.38 35[24] 3.3/8 12[25]
4 22 September 28, 2014 May 10, 2015 8.98 50[26] 3.2/7 17[26]
5 23 September 27, 2015 May 15, 2016 6.32 69[27] 2.2/7 34[27]
6 22 September 25, 2016 May 14, 2017 4.39 105[28] 1.5/5 70[28]
7 22[29] October 6, 2017 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Once Upon a Time‘s first season received “generally favorable” reviews from critics. Metacritic gave it a score of 66 out of 100 based on 26 reviews. The pilot episode was watched by 12.93 million viewers and achieved an adult 18–49 rating/share of 4.0/10. The second season premiered on September 30, 2012, to an audience of 11.36 million viewers, while the third season began on September 29, 2013, opening to 8.52 million viewers. In May 2014, ABC renewed the show for its fourth season, premiering in September 2014 to an audience of 9.47 million viewers. The series was renewed for a fifth season in May 2015 and for a sixth season in March 2016.[30] On May 11, 2017, ABC renewed the series for a 22-episode seventh season.[31]

Cast[edit]

Main article: List of Once Upon a Time characters

Development and production[edit]

Conception[edit]

Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis conceived the show in 2004 before joining the writing staff of Lost, but wanted to wait until that series was over to focus on this project.[42]

The idea is to take these characters that we all know collectively and try to find things about them that we haven’t explored before. Sometimes it’s a story point, sometimes it’s a thematic connection, sometimes it’s a dilemma they face in both worlds that is similar. We are not generally retelling the exact same story as the fairy tale world.

— Executive producer Adam Horowitz[43]

Eight years before the Once Upon a Time pilot (the two had just completed their work on Felicity, in 2002), Kitsis and Horowitz became inspired to write fairy tales out of a love of “mystery and excitement of exploring lots of different worlds.”[44] They presented the premise to networks, but were refused because of its fantastic nature.[45] From their time on Lost, the writers learned to look at the story in a different way,[45] namely that “character has to trump mythology.”[43]

They explained,

“As people, you’ve got to see what the void in their heart or in their lives is to care about them … For us, this was as much about the character journeys and seeing what was ripped from them in coming to Storybrooke – going at it that way as opposed to making it the ‘break-the-curse show.'”[46]

Despite the comparisons and similarities to Lost, the writers intend them to be very different shows.[45] To them, Lost concerned itself with redemption, while Once Upon a Time is about “hope”.[47] Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof aids in the development of the series as a consultant, but has no official credit on the show. Kitsis and Horowitz have called him a “godfather” to the series.[48][49] To differentiate the storytelling from what the audience already knew, the writing staff decided to begin the pilot with the end of the typical Snow White fairytale.[46] Themes concerning family and motherhood were emphasized, in contrast to the focus on fatherhood in Lost. Kitsis and Horowitz sought to write strong female characters, rather than the classic damsel in distress. Horowitz stated their desire to approach each character the same way, asking themselves, “How do we make these icons real, make them relatable?”[45]

The pilot is meant to be the “template of the series”.[44] Kitsis confirmed that every week will contain flashbacks between both worlds,[43] as they “love the idea of going back and forth and informing what the character is missing in their life.”[50] The writers’ desire to present a “mash up” of many small characters can be seen in a scene of the pilot, in which there is a war council featuring Geppetto, Pinocchio, and Grumpy. Horowitz elaborated, “One of the fun things for us coming up with these stories is thinking of ways these different characters can interact in ways they never have before.”[45] Since then, the creators have added more elements, and given its ties to Disney, have managed to expand the universe to include more recent material, by throwing out hints that they might look ahead at incorporating characters from Brave and Frozen in future episodes, if they get the green light from Disney.[51] The Season 3 finale introduced Elsa in the final minutes of the episode.[52]

The general premise, importing the Snow White core characters into the “real world”, was previously seen on ABC television in the short-lived 1980s comedy The Charmings. The show also has a similar premise to Bill Willingham‘s ten-year-old comic series Fables, to which ABC bought the rights in 2008 but never made it past planning stages. After Fablesfans raised controversy over possible appropriation, the show writers initially denied a link, but later said they may have “read a couple issues” of the comic book but while the two concepts are “in the same playground”, they are “telling a different story.”[50] Bill Willingham responded to the controversy in an interview, where he stated he did not feel the show was plagiarism and said: “Maybe they did remember reading Fables back then, but didn’t want to mention it because we’ve become a very litigious people.”[50][53]

Casting[edit]

The cast as they appeared in season three.

Secondary character casting director, Samuel Forsyth, started the casting process in 2010. Horowitz stated that everyone they initially wanted for roles in the series accepted their roles after being sent a script.[44][45] Ginnifer Goodwin was cast as Snow White / Mary Margaret Blanchard,[54] who appreciated that she would be playing a strong character that was fleshed out for the audience. Goodwin had stated in interviews that she would love to play Snow White, and called her acceptance of the role “a no-brainer.”[55]Both Kitsis and Horowitz are self-described big fans of Goodwin’s previous series, Big Love, and wrote the part of Snow White with her in mind.[45] Josh Dallas, who portrays Prince Charming / David Nolan, was pleased the writers took “some dramatic license” with his character, believing the prince had become more real. He explained,

“Prince Charming just happens to be a name. He’s still a man with the same emotions as any other man. He’s a Prince, but he’s a Prince of the people. He gets his hands dirty. He’s got a kingdom to run. He has a family to protect. He has an epic, epic love for Snow White. He’s like everybody else. He’s human.”[55]

Jennifer Morrison was hired for the part of Emma Swan.[56] The actress explained her character as someone who “help[s] her son Henry whom she abandoned when he was a baby and who seems like he’s a little bit emotionally dysfunctional”, but noted that Emma does not start out believing in the fairytale universe.[55] Ten-year old Jared Gilmore, known for his work on Mad Men, took the role of her son, Henry.[56] The role of The Evil Queen/ Regina was given to Lana Parrilla.[57]

“There’s always two stories being told when playing Regina. There’s the threat of her knowing she’s an evil queen and then there’s just the pure simple fact that the biological mother has stepped into her world and the threat of losing her son is just enormous. That’s a fear that I think any adopted mother would have. I think that’s going to really help the audience relate to Regina in some level.”

Lana Parrilla[55]

The role of Rumplestiltskin / Mr. Gold was given to Robert Carlyle,[58] after having been written with him in mind, though the writers initially thought he would not accept the part.[43] Horowitz recalled Carlyle’s prison sequence, which was the actor’s first day on the set as “mind-blowing … You could see Ginny actually jump, the first time he did that character. It was fantastic!”[44]Jamie Dornan portrayed the Huntsman / Sheriff Graham[59] as a series regular before being killed off in the seventh episode,[60]while Eion Bailey was cast as Pinocchio / August Wayne Booth[59] in a recurring role,[61] starting in the show’s ninth episode, “True North”, where he was credited as “Stranger”, he was promoted to series regular status for the fifteenth episode, “Red-Handed”.[62] Raphael Sbarge portrayed Jiminy Cricket / Dr. Archie Hopper.[59]

For the second season, Meghan Ory and Emilie de Ravin were promoted to series regulars as Red Riding Hood / Ruby[63] and Belle / Lacey[64] respectively, while Bailey made guest appearances in two episodes after departing the series[65][66] and Sbarge joined the recurring cast.[67] Colin O’Donoghue was cast as Captain Killian “Hook” Jones,[68] and was upped to series regular for the fourteenth episode of the season.[69]

For the third season, Michael Raymond-James was promoted to a series regular as Neal Cassidy,[70] while Ory did not return as a series regular due to commitments to the TV series, Intelligence.[71]

For the fourth season, Michael Socha was brought onto the show as Will Scarlet / Knave of Hearts from the show’s spin-off, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland,[72][73] while Raymond-James was dropped from the regular cast[74] when the writers decided to kill off his character.[74] Bailey returned in a recurring arc towards the end of the season after being absent from the show since the second season.[75]

For the fifth season, Rebecca Mader[40] and Sean Maguire[40] were announced to have been promoted to series regulars as Zelena / Wicked Witch of the West and Robin Hoodrespectively, while Socha was confirmed to not be returning as a series regular.[76] Ory also returned to the series in a recurring capacity after being absent since the third-season finale.[39]

Before the series was renewed for a seventh season, Jennifer Morrison announced that, if the series were to be renewed, she would not be returning as a series regular for that season but agreed to return for one episode to wrap up Emma Swan’s storyline.[77] Later that week, actress Rebecca Mader announced that she would also be leaving the series after the sixth season wrapped. It was later announced that Ginnifer Goodwin, Josh Dallas, Jared S. Gilmore and Emilie de Ravin would also be leaving the show after the sixth season’s finale aired. Along with departures, Andrew J. West and Alison Fernandez were announced to be joining the seventh season of the show as series regulars after guest starring in the previous season’s finale. They will portray an older Henry Mills and his daughter Lucy respectively. In July 2017, actresses Dania Ramirez and Gabrielle Anwar were announced to be joining the cast of the seventh season as series regulars, playing new iterations of Cinderella and Lady Tremaine, respectively. In September 2017, Mekia Cox, who portrays Tiana, was promoted to a series regular.[78]

Filming[edit]

Steveston, BC doubles as the town of Storybrooke, Maine for the series’ six seasons.

Principal photography for the series takes place in Vancouver, British Columbia.[79][80] The village of Steveston in the adjacent city of Richmond doubles as Storybrooke for the series, with props and exterior sets disguising the existing businesses and buildings. During filming, all brightly-colored objects (flowers, etc.) are hidden to reinforce the story village’s spell-subdued character. Certain sets are additionally filmed in separate studios, including the interior of Mr. Gold’s pawn shop and the clock tower, which are not found in Steveston.[81]

Setting[edit]

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Main settings[edit]

During the first six seasons, the Enchanted Forest was one of the main setting of the series. The Enchanted Forest is a realm within Fairy Tale Land, but the actual spread and scope of the realm is not known. However, they were later united during the Ogre Wars, which played a part in the formation of the War Council that was formed by Prince Charming and served as the catalysts in the backstories involving Rumpelstiltskin and the Evil Queen. Several independent kingdoms are implied by an array of different rulers. Most of the stories detailed their earlier lives before ascension to power and being influenced by their mentors through their upbringings.

The Land Without Magic, commonly known as the Real World, is another main setting, shown as a place devoid with magic, and not connected to the others. It is often said that travelling to the Land Without Magic is hard, but possible, such as magical doors created by the Apprentice, magic beans, or the Dark Curse. During the first six seasons, Storybrooke, Maine was the main setting, serving as an isolated town separated from the rest of the world, where the cursed inhabitants are trapped by various forces. During the series’ seventh season, the setting shifted to Hyperion Heights, Seattle, where unlike Storybrooke, its cursed inhabitants are living among ordinary people.

During the seventh season, the New Enchanted Forest[82] is shown as the main setting, alongside with Hyperion Heights. As a world of its own, it is divided into several independent kingdoms with different rulers. Due to a conflict among its people and the royal family, a resistance is formed to rebel against them and Lady Tremaine. Most flashbacks shown are involving events happened before the original curse and before the latest curse that brought everyone to Hyperion Heights.

Expanded settings[edit]

The realms and worlds featured in the series are mostly based on many fairy tales, mythologies and real life locations and are magical, unlike the real world which is dubbed the Land Without Magic. Just like the Enchanted Forest, the other realms and worlds were affected by the Evil Queen’s curse, but indirectly, merely freezing them in time and state for twenty-eight years.

Some of the worlds within the universe are mostly based fairy tales where witchcraft plays a vital role in the lands. Known worlds are Fairy Tale Land,[83] Wonderland,[83]Neverland,[83] the Land of Oz,[83] the Alternate World,[84] the Land of Untold Stories,[83] the World Behind the Mirror,[85] the Dark Realm,[86] the Wish Realm,[86] the New Enchanted Forest,[87] the Edge of Realms,[88] and New Wonderland.[89]

There are also worlds known as the Realms of Storytelling.[90] These realms are mostly based on the Land Without Magic, taking the name of a certain location and a certain time period. Known worlds are the Land Without Color,[83] 19th Century London,[91] Victorian England,[92] Kansas,[93] 1920s England,[94] 19th Century France,[95] and the Land Without Stories.[96]

Additionally, several spiritual worlds exist in the universe. These worlds are known to not sustain living inhabitants, merely souls of the living in some and the deceased in others, with exception of the deities. Such worlds are the Dreamscape,[97] the Netherworld,[98] the Underworld,[99] the Worst Place,[100] and Mount Olympus.[101]

Cultural references[edit]

As a nod to the ties between the production teams of Once Upon a Time and Lost, the former show contains allusions to Lost, and is expected to continue alluding to Lost throughout its run.[50] For example, many items found in the Lost universe, such as Apollo candy barsOceanic AirlinesAjira Airways, the TV series Exposé and MacCutcheon Whiskey, can be seen in Once Upon a Time.[102]

Music[edit]

Mark Isham composed the series’ theme and music. On February 14, 2012, an extended play album featuring four cues from the score was released by ABC Studios.[103] On May 1, 2012, a full-length 25-track official soundtrack album was released by Intrada Records to accompany season one.[104] On August 13, 2013, another full-length 25-track official soundtrack album was released by Intrada to accompany season two.[105] Since December 2015, Mark Isham had begun to release music that was previously not released from the third, fourth and fifth seasons on his Soundcloud account.

[show]Season 1 Soundtrack

 

[show]Season 2 Soundtrack

Broadcast[edit]

The series has been licensed to over 190 countries.[106] In Australia, Once Upon a Time first aired on Seven Network, starting on May 15, 2012. In Canada it airs on CTV from October 23, 2011. It premiered on Channel 5 in the United Kingdom on April 1, 2012.[107] On December 17, 2013, it was confirmed that Channel 5 would not be picking the series up for the third season airing in the UK.[107] On March 14, 2015, Netflix picked up the show in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, subsequently showing all seasons and premiering each new episode on Wednesdays after their initial showing on Sundays on ABC.

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Critical response to the first season was generally positive. On Metacritic, it was given a score of 66 out of 100 with “generally favorable reviews”.[108] E!‘s Kristin dos Santos cited the show as one of the five new shows of the 2011–2012 season to watch.[109] Matthew Gilbert of The Boston Globe gave the show a “C+” grade commenting

“From a pair of Lost producers, this is a love-or-hate proposition. The ambition is impressive, as it asks us to imagine Goodwin’s Snow White and Parrilla’s Evil Queen as moderns. But Morrison is a wooden lead, and the back stories – a random collection of fairy tales — don’t promise to surprise.”[110]

In a review from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, TV critic Gail Pennington hailed it as one of the “Most Promising Shows of The Fall” and, unlike Gilbert, had high marks for Morrison.[111]USA Today‘s Robert Blanco placed the series on its top ten list, declaring that “There’s nothing else on the air quite like it.”[112] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times preferred the series to another fairy-tale themed drama, Grimm, citing that the premise takes its time building up the charm and that the producer “has that part nailed”. She also gave excellent reviews for Morrison’s character: “Her Emma is predictably cynical and prickly – fairy-tale princess, my Aunt Fanny – but she’s sharp and lively enough to keep audiences begging for ‘just a few more pages’ before they go to bed.”[113]

Several feminist outlets were pleased with the show for its feminist twist on fairy tales. Avital Norman Nathman of Bitch stated that she liked the show for “infusing a feminist sensibility” into the stories.[114] Genie Leslie at Feministing commented that Emma was a “badass”, that she liked how Emma was “very adamant that women be able to make their own decisions about their lives and their children”, and how Emma was a “well-rounded” character who was “feminine, but not ‘girly'”.[115] Natalie Wilson from Ms. praised the show for a strong, “kick-butt” female lead, for including multiple strong women who take turns doing the saving with the men, for subverting the fetishization of true love, and for dealing with the idea of what makes a mother in a more nuanced fashion. Wilson went on to state of the lead: “Her pursuit of a ‘happy ending’ is not about finding a man or going to a ball all gussied up, but about detective work, about building a relationship with her son Henry, and about seeking the ‘truth’ as to why time stands still in the corrupt Storybrooke world.”[116]

Ratings[edit]

The first season premiered as the top-rated drama series. The pilot episode was watched by 13 million viewers and received a 4.0 rating/share among 18- to 49-year-olds.[117] It was the season’s highest-rated drama debut among the age range and ABC’s biggest debut in five years.[118][119] With DVR viewers, the premiere climbed to 15.5 million viewers and a 5.2 rating/share in adults 18–49.[120] The show’s next three episodes had consistent ratings every week with over 11 million viewers.[121][122][123] The series has become the number one non-sports program in the U.S. with viewers and young adults on Sunday nights.[124]

Season Timeslot (ET) Episodes First aired Last aired TV season Rank Avg. viewers
(millions)
18–49 rating
(average)
Date Viewers
(millions)
Date Viewers
(millions)
1 Sunday 8:00 pm 22 October 23, 2011 12.93[125] May 13, 2012 9.66[126] 2011–12 28 11.71[127] 4.1/10[128]
2 22 September 30, 2012 11.36[129] May 12, 2013 7.33[130] 2012–13 35 10.24[131] 3.6/9[132]
3 22 September 29, 2013 8.52[133] May 11, 2014 6.80[134] 2013–14 35 9.38[135] 3.3/8[136]
4 22 September 28, 2014 9.47[137] May 10, 2015 5.51[138] 2014–15 50 8.98[139] 3.2/7[139]
5 23 September 27, 2015 5.93[140] May 15, 2016 4.07[141] 2015–16 69 6.32[27] 2.2[27]
6 22 September 25, 2016 3.99[142] May 14, 2017 2.95[143] 2016–17 105 4.39[144] 1.5/5[28]
7 Friday 8:00 pm 22[145] October 6, 2017 3.26[146] TBA TBD 2017–18 TBD TBD TBD

Awards and nominations[edit]

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Once Upon a Time

Once Upon a Time was nominated for a 2012 People’s Choice Award for “Favorite New TV Drama”, but lost to Person of Interest.[147] The show was nominated at the 39th People’s Choice Awards in four categories: Favorite Network TV Drama, Favorite Sci-Fi/Fantasy Show, Favorite TV Fan Following, and Favorite TV Drama Actress (Ginnifer Goodwin); it lost to another ABC show Grey’s Anatomy in the first category, Supernatural in the second two, and Ellen Pompeo (from Grey’s Anatomy) in the last category. the show was nominated at 40th People’s Choice Awards, but lost to Beauty and the Beast and The Vampire Diaries, respectively.

The show was also nominated for “Best Genre Series” at the 2011 Satellite Awards, but lost to American Horror Story.[148] The show was nominated in this category again at the 2012 Satellite Awards, but lost to The Walking Dead.[149]

The program also received three nominations at the 2012 Visual Effects Society Awards, but all lost to Boardwalk EmpireGears of War 3, and Terra Nova.[150]

At the 38th Saturn Awards, the series received a nomination for Best Network Television Series and Parrilla was nominated for Best Supporting Actress on Television, but lost to Fringe and Michelle Forbes, respectively.[151]

The program was nominated for the former award again at the 39th Saturn Awards, but lost to new series Revolution.[152]

Jared S. Gilmore was nominated for Best Performance by an Younger Actor on Television at 40th Saturn Awards, but lost to Chandler Riggs for The Walking Dead

The show received trophies for “Favorite New TV Drama” and “Favorite Villain” for Lana Parrilla by the TV Guide.[153]

The show was nominated at the 2012 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire DiariesPretty Little Liars and Awkward and the show was also nominated at 2013 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire Diaries and Pretty Little Liars.

The show was nominated again 2014 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire Diaries and Dylan O’Brien, respectively.

It was also nominated at the 64th Creative Arts Primetime Emmy Awards, but lost to Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead and the show was nominated again at 65th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards, but lost to The Borgias and Game of Thrones.

Tie-in material[edit]

Novels[edit]

In 2013, Disney-owned Hyperion Books published Reawakened by Odette Beane, a novelization of storylines from the first season, expanded to include new perspectives. The narrative is from the points-of-view of Emma Swan in Storybrooke and Snow White in the Enchanted Forest. The novel was published on April 28, 2013, as an ebook and May 7, 2013, in paperback form.[154]

In 2015, production company Kingswell Teen published Red’s Untold Tale, by Wendy Toliver, a novel telling a story of Red’s past that was not seen in the show. The novel was published on September 22, 2015 and consisted of 416 pages.

In 2017, Kingswell Teen published a second novel, Regina Rising, also written by Wendy Toliver, which depicts the life of a sixteen year old Regina. The novel was published on April 25, 2017.

Comic books[edit]

 

The Vault

 

The Vault (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vault
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dan Bush
Produced by Tom Butterfield
Alex Cutler
Luke Daniels
Alan Pao
Written by Dan Bush
Conal Byrne
Starring ·         Francesca Eastwood

·         Taryn Manning

·         Scott Haze

·         Q’orianka Kilcher

·         Clifton Collins Jr.

·         James Franco

Music by Shaun Drew
Cinematography Andrew Shulkind
Edited by Dan Bush
Ed Marx
Production
company
Redwire Pictures
Content Media
Culmination Productions
Casadelic Pictures
Jeff Rice Films
LB Entertainment
Imprint Entertainment
Psychopia Pictures
Distributed by FilmRise
Release date ·         September 1, 2017
Running time 91 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Box office $5,728[2]

The Vault is a 2017 American thriller film directed by Dan Bush and written by Dan Bush and Conal Byrne. The film stars Francesca EastwoodTaryn ManningScott HazeQ’orianka KilcherClifton Collins Jr. and James Franco. The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

After starting a fire in a nearby warehouse as a diversion, five robbers — Leah; her sister, Vee; their brother, Michael; Kramer, the safecracker; and Cyrus, the muscle — initiate a bank robbery. An officer inside the bank tries to call for help on his police radio. Detective Iger, who had just been in the bank hears the call, and decides to check it out. While walking back to check on the bank he hears another, anonymous call on his radio about the robbery.

The robbers find only $70,000 in the vault. Leah wants to leave but Vee and Cyrus demand more money. The assistant manager (James Franco) says he will tell them where $6 million is stored, as long as they don’t hurt anyone. He tells them the money is in the basement vault which is a part of the old bank and hands them the key to the access door.

By now police are stationed outside the bank, and Leah is confused as to how they knew about the heist. The head teller, Susan, tries to connect with Michael, telling him he is a decent man. He tells her that he owes people a lot of money and his sisters are helping him rob the bank.

When Kramer successfully breaks open the vault, the lights flicker. A man in a white mask and what appears to be a group of the hostages attack him. He is then pulled inside the old vault. Leah and Vee watch from the security monitors upstairs, but only Kramer appears on the screen. Thinking there are more people in the bank, Leah ask Cyrus to count the hostages that are gathered inside the safety deposit vault. The lights start to flicker again and the vault door closes with Cyrus and the hostages inside. As Kramer is repeatedly stabbed in the basement vault, Cyrus is overcome by the same group of hostages that attacked Kramer. The man in the white mask appears and grabs his gun, forcing it into Cyrus’s mouth. When the vault door opens again, Leah goes in but Cyrus is nowhere in sight. Michael sees Kramer commit suicide.

Suspecting that Susan called the police, Leah interrogates her. Susan tells Leah about the robbery in 1982 where a robber in a white mask apparently “snapped” under the pressure and killed some hostages, forced some to kill each other and then burned the rest alive in the old vault. The masked man was never caught or found. Vee turns up with a bag of money — but the bills are all from 1982.

After the police attempt to take her and Vee out with sniper fire, an outgoing call indicator on an office telephone catches Leah’s attention. She picks it up and listens to the same robbery message that Detective Iger had heard earlier. Michael cuts into a water pipe to make an escape route and encounters a burned woman pleading for help. Vee finds Cyrus’s body with his head blown off. Leah heads outside and releases one of the hostages. She asks the Detective who made the phone call to the police. He answers that the message came from the radio, they never received any phone calls. Leah goes back inside to the telephone and listens to the same message being repeated, suddenly recognising the voice.

Vee escapes through the water pipe. As Michael begins setting the place on fire to cover their escape, Leah lets the hostages go. As she attempts to escape through the water pipe, the masked man and undead hostages attack her. Michael distracts them long enough to allow Leah to escape, then sets the place on fire, sacrificing himself.

During the ensuing police interview of the hostages, Detective Iger tries to find out why they know nothing about the bank employee who helped the robbers. Susan says she knows all the employees inside the bank for ten years and had never seen the man claiming him before. Susan looks at the investigation wall and points to a picture of the assistant manager. Detective Iger tells her the picture is of someone who died in the 1982 incident. He was the assistant manager who had called the police to report the robbery but was shot by the robber. It was the same call that Leah and Detective Iger had heard the previous day.

Leah and Vee meet in a rural area. The police assume all of the robbers died in the fire, so they are free to start their lives anew. When their car won’t start, Vee checks on the engine and is attacked by the man in the white mask.

Cast[edit]

  • Francesca Eastwoodas Leah Dillon
  • Taryn Manningas Vee Dillon
  • Scott Hazeas Michael Dillon
  • Q’orianka Kilcheras Susan Cromwell
  • Clifton Collins Jr.as Detective Iger
  • James Francoas The Assistant Manager/Ed Maas
  • Keith Lonekeras Cyrus
  • Jeff Gum as James Aiken
  • Jill Jane Clements as Mary
  • Michael Milford as Kramer
  • Aleksander Vayshelboym as Ben
  • Debbie Sherman as Lauren
  • Lee Broda as Nancy
  • Anthony DiRocco as Mark Fishman
  • Dmitry Paniotto as Max
  • Adina Galupa as Rebecca
  • Beatrice Hernandez as Pamela
  • Cristin Azure as Baghead Samantha
  • Rebecca Ray as Samantha
  • John D. Hickman as Marty
  • Robin Martino as Baghead Rebecca
  • Keenan Rogers as Baghead Thomas

Release[edit]

On November 5, 2016, FilmRise acquired distribution rights to the film.[3] The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.[4]

Reception[edit]

Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a rating of 14% based on reviews from 14 critics.[5] The film received an aggregate score of 60 out of 100 on Metacritic.[6]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^“The Vault Reviews”

. Metacritic. Retrieved 2017-09-02.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Box Office Mojo. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^Dave McNary (2016-11-05). “AFM: James Franco’s Heist Thriller ‘The Vault’ Sells to FilmRise”

. Variety. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^Clark Collis (2017-07-24). “James Franco stars in terrifying trailer for The Vault”

. Ew.com. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^http://www.metacritic.com/movie/the-vault

External links[edit]

on IMDb

Categories:

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lice Through the Looking Glass (2016 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alice Through the Looking Glass
Theatrical release poster
Directed by James Bobin
Produced by ·         Joe Roth

·         Suzanne Todd

·         Jennifer Todd

·         Tim Burton

Written by Linda Woolverton
Based on Characters
by Lewis Carroll
Starring ·         Johnny Depp

·         Anne Hathaway

·         Mia Wasikowska

·         Matt Lucas

·         Rhys Ifans

·         Helena Bonham Carter

·         Sacha Baron Cohen

Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Stuart Dryburgh
Edited by Andrew Weisblum
Production
company
·         Walt Disney Pictures

·         Roth Films

·         Team Todd

·         Tim Burton Productions

Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release date ·         May 10, 2016 (London)

·         May 27, 2016 (United States)

Running time 113 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $170 million[2]
Box office $299.5 million[1]

Alice Through the Looking Glass is a 2016 American fantasy adventure film directed by James Bobin, written by Linda Woolvertonand produced by Tim BurtonJoe RothSuzanne Todd, and Jennifer Todd. It is based on the characters created by Lewis Carroll and is the sequel to the 2010 film Alice in Wonderland. The film stars Johnny DeppAnne HathawayMia WasikowskaMatt LucasRhys IfansHelena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen and features the voices of Stephen FryMichael SheenTimothy Spall, and Alan Rickman, in his final film role.

In the film, Alice comes across a magical looking glass that takes her back to Wonderland, where she finds that the Mad Hatter is acting madder than usual and wants to discover the truth about his family. Alice then travels through time (with the “Chronosphere”), comes across friends and enemies at different points of their lives, and embarks on a race to save the Hatter before time runs out.

The film premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 27, 2016. Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $299.5 million on a budget of $170 million.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

Alice Kingsleigh has spent the past three years following in her father’s footsteps and sailing the high seas. Upon her return to Londonfrom China, Alice discovers that her ex-fiancé, Hamish Ascot, has married her look-alike and taken over her father’s company and plans to have her sell him her father’s ship, “the Wonder”, in exchange for her family home. Unable to make a choice, Alice runs away, and comes across her butterfly friend Absolem, who disappears through a mysterious mirror in one of the upstairs rooms, returning to Wonderland.

There, Alice is greeted by Mirana of Marmoreal the White QueenNivens McTwisp the White Rabbit, the TweedlesMallymkun the DormouseThackery Earwicket the March HareBayard, and the Cheshire Cat. They inform her that Tarrant Hightopp the Mad Hatteris in poor health because his family is missing following the Attack of the Jabberwocky. The attack occurred shortly after his father, Zanik, a hat retailer, seemed to reject Tarrant’s gift of a hat creation.

The White Queen persuades Alice to convince Time himself to save the Mad Hatter’s family in the past, believing her to be the only one who can save the Hatter. However, she cautions Alice about Time, and that if her past self sees her future self, everything will be history. As Alice sets out, she ends up in a dreary castle, where Time himself, a demigod that is part-human, part-clock, resides. As Alice tries to consult Time, she finds the Chronosphere, an object that powers all time in Wonderland and will allow her to travel to any time in the past.

Alice ignores Time’s warning that the past is unchangeable, and steals the Chronosphere, shortly after finding Iracebeth of Crims, the exiled Red Queen, in the care of Time. Alice accidentally flies to the day of Iracebeth’s coronation, where a younger Mad Hatter mocks the Red Queen when the royal crown doesn’t fit on her abnormally large head. This causes Iracebeth to melt down, and her father deems her emotionally unqualified to rule and passes the title of queen to her younger sister, the White Queen.

Alice learns of an event in Iracebeth’s and Mirana’s past that caused friction between the two and travels back in time again, hoping it will change Iracebeth’s ways and stop the Jabberwocky from killing the Hatter’s family. She learns that the hat that the Mad Hatter thought his father threw away was actually treasured by him. Meanwhile, at the White Queen and Red Queen’s castle, at the time they are children, Mirana steals a tart from her mother and eats it. When confronted by their mother, Mirana lies about eating the tart, and Iracebeth is accused, causing her to run out of the castle. Alice sees that Iracebeth is about to run into a clock, thinking that’s the event that deforms her head and personality. Alice prevents that collision but fails to change the past, as Iracebeth trips and slams her head into a stone wall instead.

A weakened Time then confronts Alice after relentless searching, and scolds her for putting all of time in danger. Out of panic, Alice runs into a nearby mirror back in the real world, where she wakes up in a mental hospital, diagnosed with female hysteria. As Dr. Addison Bennett, a psychiatric doctor, tries to inject her with a sedative, with her mother Helen’s encouragement and help, she escapes and returns to Wonderland via the mirror, where she travels to Horevendush Day, when the Hightopp family was killed. Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter’s family was captured by the Red Queen instead and never died. Returning to the present, however, Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter is on the brink of death.

Alice, close to tears, says that she believes him, and Tarrant transforms back to his normal self. The Wonderlandians go to the Red Queen’s new organic plant castle, where the Mad Hatter finds his family shrunk and trapped in an ant farm. However, the Red Queen apprehends them and steals the Chronosphere from Alice. Ignoring Time’s warning, she takes her sister back to the day she lied about the tart. By the time the Mad Hatter and Alice get there, the Red Queen and her younger self have seen each other. Time becomes a paradox, and Wonderland begins to freeze in rust. As a powerless Time’s pleas, Alice and the Mad Hatter, with the White Queen and now-frozen Red Queen, use the Chronosphere to race back to the present as the rust proceeds to spread all over the ocean of Time and the castle, where Alice places the Chronosphere in its original place in time.

With the Chronosphere stabilized, Wonderland, including those frozen, are reverted to normal. The Mad Hatter reunites with his family, and the White Queen and Red Queen make amends, while Time forgives Alice for the trouble she caused, but forbids her to return. Alice bids farewell to her friends and returns to the real world through another mirror. Alice finds her mother, Helen, about to sign over the Wonder to Hamish and reassures her that it’s only a ship. Helen decides to support her daughter regardless. Hamish seizes the Kingsleigh family home but not the ship. Alice and her mother set out to travel the world together with their own shipping company.

Cast[edit]

Voice cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Tall ships in Gloucester Docks for the filming of Alice Through the Looking Glass. August 2014

The film was announced via Variety in December 2012.[11] Bobin was first approached about the project while doing post-production work on Muppets Most Wanted,[12] Of being asked, Bobin has said that “I just couldn’t pass it up”, as he has a passion for the works of Lewis Carroll as well as history in general.[13] In July 2013, it was announced that Johnny Depp would return as the Hatter,[14] with Mia Wasikowska‘s return confirmed the following November.[15] In January 2014 Sacha Baron Cohen joined the cast to play Time.[16] In May 2014, Rhys Ifansjoined the cast to play Zanik Hightopp, the Mad Hatter’s father.[17] In developing the character of “Time”, Bobin sought to avoid creating a “straight-up bad guy”, noting that it would be “a bit dull”, and also that the role in that universe already existed in the form of The Red Queen.[12] Instead, Bobin sought to make Time a “Twit”, further explaining that “There’s no one better at playing the confident idiot trope than Sacha Baron Cohen”, and adding that “it was very much with Sacha in mind”.[12]

Principal photography began on August 4, 2014, at Shepperton Studios.[18] In August 2014, filming took place in Gloucester Docks, which included the use of at least four historic ships: Kathleen and MayIreneExcelsior, and the Earl of Pembroke, the last of which was renamed The Wonder for filming.[19][20][21][22][23] Principal photography ended on October 31, 2014.[24]

Soundtrack[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Film score by Danny Elfman
Released May 27, 2016
Recorded 2016
Studio Abbey Road Studios
Genre Orchestralpop rock
Length 76:53
Label Walt Disney
Producer Danny Elfman
Danny Elfman film scores chronology
Goosebumps
(2015)
Alice Through the Looking Glass
(2016)
Before I Wake
(2016)
Singles from Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
1.      “Just Like Fire
Released: April 15, 2016

2.      “Alice”
Released: May 27, 2016

3.      “Saving the Ship”
Released: May 27, 2016

4.      “Looking Glass”
Released: June 1, 2016

5.      “Truth”
Released: July 28, 2016

6.      “Story of Time”
Released: August 7, 2016

7.      “The Red Queen”
Released: October 18, 2016

8.      “The Chronosphere”
Released: October 20, 2016

The film’s score was composed by Danny Elfman. The soundtrack was released on May 27, 2016, by Walt Disney RecordsPinkrecorded the song “Just Like Fire” for the film, and also covered Jefferson Airplane‘s “White Rabbit“, only used in the film’s promotional material.

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Danny Elfman.

No. Title Length
1. “Alice” 6:35
2. “Saving the Ship” 3:40
3. “Watching Time” 5:10
4. “Looking Glass” 3:30
5. “To the Rescue” 0:56
6. “Hatter House” 3:47
7. “The Red Queen” 2:29
8. “The Chronosphere” 4:15
9. “Warning Hightopps” 2:23
10. “Tea Time Forever” 1:45
11. “Oceans of Time” 1:15
12. “Hat Heartbreak” 2:27
13. “Asylum Escape” 4:06
14. “Hatter’s Deathbed” 3:22
15. “Finding the Family” 2:04
16. “Time Is Up” 4:24
17. “World’s End” 1:50
18. “Truth” 4:09
19. “Goodbye Alice” 2:13
20. “Kingsleigh & Kingsleigh” 1:19
21. “Seconds Song” 0:11
22. “Friends United” 1:06
23. “Time’s Castle” 1:49
24. “The Seconds” 1:55
25. “Clock Shop” 0:50
26. “They’re Alive” 2:23
27. “Story of Time” 3:03
28. Just Like Fire” (performed by Pink) 3:35
Total length: 76:53

Release[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released on May 27, 2016, in the United States by Walt Disney Pictures.

Home media[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass was released on Blu-ray, DVD and digital download on October 18, 2016, by Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment.[25][26] It debuted at No. 2 in the Blu-ray Disc sales charts.[27]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $77 million in the United States and Canada and $222.4 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $299.5 million, against a budget of $170 million.[1]

North America[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass opened in the United States and Canada on May 27, 2016, alongside X-Men: Apocalypse, and was initially projected to gross $55–60 million from 3,763 theaters over its four-day Memorial Day opening weekend, but projections were continuously revised downwards due to poor word of mouth.[28] It had the added benefit of playing in over 3,100 3D theaters, 380 IMAX screens, 77 premium large formats and 79 D-box locations.[29][30] It made $1.5 million from Thursday previews (to the first film’s $3.9 million)[31] and just $9.7 million on its first day, compared to the $41 million opening Friday of its predecessor.[32] Through its opening weekend, it earned $27 million, which when compared to its predecessor’s $116 million opening is down 70%.[28] While 3D represented 71% ($82 million) of the original film’s opening gross, 3D constituted only 41% ($11 million) for this sequel, with 29% coming from traditional 3D shows, 11% from IMAX, and 1% from premium large formats.[33] It became the studio’s third Memorial Day opening flop following Tomorrowland in 2015 and Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time in 2010.[33] During its first week, the film grossed $40.1 million.[34] In its second weekend, the film grossed $11.3 million (a 55.1% drop), finishing 4th at the box office.[35]

Other countries[edit]

The film was released across 43 countries (72% of its total market place) the same weekend as the US, and was estimated to gross $80–100 million in its opening weekend. It faced competition from Warcraft and X-Men: Apocalypse.[36] It ended up grossing $62.7 million, which is well below the projections of which $4.1 million came from IMAX shows.[37] It had an opening weekend gross in Mexico ($4.5 million), Brazil ($4.1 million), and Russia ($3.9 million).[37] In the United Kingdom and Ireland, it had an unsuccessful opening by grossing just £2.23 million ($3.1 million) during its opening weekend, a mere 21% of the first film’s £10.56 million ($15.2 million) opening from 603 theaters. It debuted in second place behind X-Men: Apocalypse which was on its second weekend of play.[38] In China, it had an opening day of an estimated $7.3 million[39] and went on to score the second biggest Disney live-action (non-Marvel or Lucasfilm) opening ever with $26.6 million, behind only The Jungle Book.[37] However, this was down from its $35–45 million projections.[40] It debuted at the No. 1 spot among newly released film in Japan with $5.2 million and $4.1 million on Saturday and Sunday. By comparison, the first film opened with $14 million on its way to a $133.6 million a total.[41][42]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 29% based on 234 reviews, and an average rating of 4.6/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Alice Through the Looking Glass is just as visually impressive as its predecessor, but that isn’t enough to cover for an underwhelming story that fails to live up to its classic characters.”[43] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 34 out of 100 based on 42 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[44] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “A–” on an A+ to F scale, the same grade earned by its predecessor.[45]

Stephen Holden of The New York Times wrote in his review, “What does all this have to do with Lewis Carroll? Hardly anything” and that overall, “It’s just an excuse on which to hang two trite overbearing fables and one amusing one”.[46] Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the movie 1.5 out of 4 stars and called the film, “gaudy, loud, complacent, and vulgar.”[47]Stephen Whitty of New York Daily News called the film “hugely expensive and extravagantly stupid” and that, overall, the movie “is just one more silly Hollywood mashup, an innocent fantasy morphed into a noisy would-be blockbuster”.[48]

Matt Zoller Seitz of RogerEbert.com was deeply critical of Through the Looking Glass, describing it as “the most offensive kind of film…one that spends an enormous amount of money yet seems to have nothing on its mind but money. You give it, they take it. And you get nothing in return but assurances that you’re seeing magic and wonder. The movie keeps repeating it in your ear, and flashing it onscreen in big block letters: MAGIC AND WONDER. MAGIC AND WONDER. But there is no magic, no wonder, just junk rehashed from a movie that was itself a rehash of Lewis Carroll, tricked out with physically unpersuasive characters and landscapes and ‘action scenes’, with blockbuster ‘journey movie’ tropes affixed to every set-piece as blatantly as Post-It Notes.”[49]

Kyle Smith of New York Post gave the film a positive review: “The screenplay (by Linda Woolverton) isn’t exactly heaving with brilliant ideas, but it works well enough as a blank canvas against which the special-effects team goes bonkers”.[50] Matthew Lickona of San Diego Reader said that while he found the visual effects to be “stupidly expensive” and the story familiar, he called it, “a solid kids’ movie in the old style”.[51]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Category Recipient(s) Result Ref(s)
Golden Raspberry Awards Worst Prequel, Remake, Rip-off or Sequel Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [52]
Worst Supporting Actor Johnny Depp
Worst Screen Combo Johnny Depp and His Vomitously Vibrant Costume
Golden Trailer Awards Best Animation Family “Poem” [53]
The Don LaFontaine Award for Best Voice Over “Poem”
Best Fantasy Adventure TV Spot “Grammys”
Best Original Score TV Spot “Grammys”
Grammy Awards Best Song Written For Visual Media Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max MartinPink and Shellback [54]
Hollywood Music in Media Awards Best Song – Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film “Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max Martin, Pink and Shellback Won [55][56]
People’s Choice Awards Favorite Family Movie Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [57]
Satellite Awards Best Art Direction and Production Design Dan Hennah [58]
Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood
Saturn Awards Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood [59]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Music: Song from a Movie or TV Show “Just Like Fire” by Pink [60]
Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

A comic book, titled Once Upon a Time: Shadow of the Queen, was released on September 4, 2013, in both digital and hardcover forms. The story was written by Dan Thomsen and Corinna Bechko, with art by Nimit Malavia, Vasilis Lolos, Mike Del Mundo, Stephanie Hans and Mike Henderson. Shadow of the Queen details what happens after the Evil Queen takes the Huntsman’s heart. She forces the Huntsman to commit evil, and try to capture Snow White yet again. The Huntsman faces his past, and also meets Red Riding Hood, who is trying to cope with her beastly alter ego. Together, they team up and try to save Snow White before all is too late.[155]

On April 14, 2014, a sequel to the first comic book called Once Upon a Time: Out of the Past was released.[156]

Spin-off[edit]

Main article: Once Upon a Time in Wonderland

In February 2013, Kitsis & Horowitz, along with producers Zack Estrin and Jane Espenson, developed a spin-off focusing on Lewis Carroll‘s Wonderland.[157] The series was called Once Upon a Time in Wonderland. A “teaser presentation” began shooting in April 2013, and the pilot was shot in late July or August.[158] On May 10, 2013, ABC announced that it had approved the spin-off and on May 14, 2013, announced that the spin-off would air in the Thursday night 8:00pm time slot instead of making it a fill-in for the parent series.[159]The series premiered on October 10, 2013, but was cancelled[160] after a single-season thirteen-episode run that ended on April 3, 2014.[161]

 

Earth Taken

 

The human race is thrown into chaos as an alien invasion takes control of the planet in an effort to find one boy out of 7 billion people who holds the power to destroy them.

Director:

Grant Humphreys

Writers:

Michael HarrisonGrant Humphreys | 1 more credit »

Stars:

Ronan QuarmbyBrad RichardsBarbara Harrison

 

 

The Vault

 

The Vault (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vault
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dan Bush
Produced by Tom Butterfield
Alex Cutler
Luke Daniels
Alan Pao
Written by Dan Bush
Conal Byrne
Starring ·         Francesca Eastwood

·         Taryn Manning

·         Scott Haze

·         Q’orianka Kilcher

·         Clifton Collins Jr.

·         James Franco

Music by Shaun Drew
Cinematography Andrew Shulkind
Edited by Dan Bush
Ed Marx
Production
company
Redwire Pictures
Content Media
Culmination Productions
Casadelic Pictures
Jeff Rice Films
LB Entertainment
Imprint Entertainment
Psychopia Pictures
Distributed by FilmRise
Release date ·         September 1, 2017
Running time 91 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Box office $5,728[2]

The Vault is a 2017 American thriller film directed by Dan Bush and written by Dan Bush and Conal Byrne. The film stars Francesca EastwoodTaryn ManningScott HazeQ’orianka KilcherClifton Collins Jr. and James Franco. The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

After starting a fire in a nearby warehouse as a diversion, five robbers — Leah; her sister, Vee; their brother, Michael; Kramer, the safecracker; and Cyrus, the muscle — initiate a bank robbery. An officer inside the bank tries to call for help on his police radio. Detective Iger, who had just been in the bank hears the call, and decides to check it out. While walking back to check on the bank he hears another, anonymous call on his radio about the robbery.

The robbers find only $70,000 in the vault. Leah wants to leave but Vee and Cyrus demand more money. The assistant manager (James Franco) says he will tell them where $6 million is stored, as long as they don’t hurt anyone. He tells them the money is in the basement vault which is a part of the old bank and hands them the key to the access door.

By now police are stationed outside the bank, and Leah is confused as to how they knew about the heist. The head teller, Susan, tries to connect with Michael, telling him he is a decent man. He tells her that he owes people a lot of money and his sisters are helping him rob the bank.

When Kramer successfully breaks open the vault, the lights flicker. A man in a white mask and what appears to be a group of the hostages attack him. He is then pulled inside the old vault. Leah and Vee watch from the security monitors upstairs, but only Kramer appears on the screen. Thinking there are more people in the bank, Leah ask Cyrus to count the hostages that are gathered inside the safety deposit vault. The lights start to flicker again and the vault door closes with Cyrus and the hostages inside. As Kramer is repeatedly stabbed in the basement vault, Cyrus is overcome by the same group of hostages that attacked Kramer. The man in the white mask appears and grabs his gun, forcing it into Cyrus’s mouth. When the vault door opens again, Leah goes in but Cyrus is nowhere in sight. Michael sees Kramer commit suicide.

Suspecting that Susan called the police, Leah interrogates her. Susan tells Leah about the robbery in 1982 where a robber in a white mask apparently “snapped” under the pressure and killed some hostages, forced some to kill each other and then burned the rest alive in the old vault. The masked man was never caught or found. Vee turns up with a bag of money — but the bills are all from 1982.

After the police attempt to take her and Vee out with sniper fire, an outgoing call indicator on an office telephone catches Leah’s attention. She picks it up and listens to the same robbery message that Detective Iger had heard earlier. Michael cuts into a water pipe to make an escape route and encounters a burned woman pleading for help. Vee finds Cyrus’s body with his head blown off. Leah heads outside and releases one of the hostages. She asks the Detective who made the phone call to the police. He answers that the message came from the radio, they never received any phone calls. Leah goes back inside to the telephone and listens to the same message being repeated, suddenly recognising the voice.

Vee escapes through the water pipe. As Michael begins setting the place on fire to cover their escape, Leah lets the hostages go. As she attempts to escape through the water pipe, the masked man and undead hostages attack her. Michael distracts them long enough to allow Leah to escape, then sets the place on fire, sacrificing himself.

During the ensuing police interview of the hostages, Detective Iger tries to find out why they know nothing about the bank employee who helped the robbers. Susan says she knows all the employees inside the bank for ten years and had never seen the man claiming him before. Susan looks at the investigation wall and points to a picture of the assistant manager. Detective Iger tells her the picture is of someone who died in the 1982 incident. He was the assistant manager who had called the police to report the robbery but was shot by the robber. It was the same call that Leah and Detective Iger had heard the previous day.

Leah and Vee meet in a rural area. The police assume all of the robbers died in the fire, so they are free to start their lives anew. When their car won’t start, Vee checks on the engine and is attacked by the man in the white mask.

Cast[edit]

  • Francesca Eastwoodas Leah Dillon
  • Taryn Manningas Vee Dillon
  • Scott Hazeas Michael Dillon
  • Q’orianka Kilcheras Susan Cromwell
  • Clifton Collins Jr.as Detective Iger
  • James Francoas The Assistant Manager/Ed Maas
  • Keith Lonekeras Cyrus
  • Jeff Gum as James Aiken
  • Jill Jane Clements as Mary
  • Michael Milford as Kramer
  • Aleksander Vayshelboym as Ben
  • Debbie Sherman as Lauren
  • Lee Broda as Nancy
  • Anthony DiRocco as Mark Fishman
  • Dmitry Paniotto as Max
  • Adina Galupa as Rebecca
  • Beatrice Hernandez as Pamela
  • Cristin Azure as Baghead Samantha
  • Rebecca Ray as Samantha
  • John D. Hickman as Marty
  • Robin Martino as Baghead Rebecca
  • Keenan Rogers as Baghead Thomas

Release[edit]

On November 5, 2016, FilmRise acquired distribution rights to the film.[3] The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.[4]

Reception[edit]

Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a rating of 14% based on reviews from 14 critics.[5] The film received an aggregate score of 60 out of 100 on Metacritic.[6]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^“The Vault Reviews”

. Metacritic. Retrieved 2017-09-02.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Box Office Mojo. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^Dave McNary (2016-11-05). “AFM: James Franco’s Heist Thriller ‘The Vault’ Sells to FilmRise”

. Variety. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^Clark Collis (2017-07-24). “James Franco stars in terrifying trailer for The Vault”

. Ew.com. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^http://www.metacritic.com/movie/the-vault

External links[edit]

on IMDb

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lice Through the Looking Glass (2016 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alice Through the Looking Glass
Theatrical release poster
Directed by James Bobin
Produced by ·         Joe Roth

·         Suzanne Todd

·         Jennifer Todd

·         Tim Burton

Written by Linda Woolverton
Based on Characters
by Lewis Carroll
Starring ·         Johnny Depp

·         Anne Hathaway

·         Mia Wasikowska

·         Matt Lucas

·         Rhys Ifans

·         Helena Bonham Carter

·         Sacha Baron Cohen

Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Stuart Dryburgh
Edited by Andrew Weisblum
Production
company
·         Walt Disney Pictures

·         Roth Films

·         Team Todd

·         Tim Burton Productions

Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release date ·         May 10, 2016 (London)

·         May 27, 2016 (United States)

Running time 113 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $170 million[2]
Box office $299.5 million[1]

Alice Through the Looking Glass is a 2016 American fantasy adventure film directed by James Bobin, written by Linda Woolvertonand produced by Tim BurtonJoe RothSuzanne Todd, and Jennifer Todd. It is based on the characters created by Lewis Carroll and is the sequel to the 2010 film Alice in Wonderland. The film stars Johnny DeppAnne HathawayMia WasikowskaMatt LucasRhys IfansHelena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen and features the voices of Stephen FryMichael SheenTimothy Spall, and Alan Rickman, in his final film role.

In the film, Alice comes across a magical looking glass that takes her back to Wonderland, where she finds that the Mad Hatter is acting madder than usual and wants to discover the truth about his family. Alice then travels through time (with the “Chronosphere”), comes across friends and enemies at different points of their lives, and embarks on a race to save the Hatter before time runs out.

The film premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 27, 2016. Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $299.5 million on a budget of $170 million.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

Alice Kingsleigh has spent the past three years following in her father’s footsteps and sailing the high seas. Upon her return to Londonfrom China, Alice discovers that her ex-fiancé, Hamish Ascot, has married her look-alike and taken over her father’s company and plans to have her sell him her father’s ship, “the Wonder”, in exchange for her family home. Unable to make a choice, Alice runs away, and comes across her butterfly friend Absolem, who disappears through a mysterious mirror in one of the upstairs rooms, returning to Wonderland.

There, Alice is greeted by Mirana of Marmoreal the White QueenNivens McTwisp the White Rabbit, the TweedlesMallymkun the DormouseThackery Earwicket the March HareBayard, and the Cheshire Cat. They inform her that Tarrant Hightopp the Mad Hatteris in poor health because his family is missing following the Attack of the Jabberwocky. The attack occurred shortly after his father, Zanik, a hat retailer, seemed to reject Tarrant’s gift of a hat creation.

The White Queen persuades Alice to convince Time himself to save the Mad Hatter’s family in the past, believing her to be the only one who can save the Hatter. However, she cautions Alice about Time, and that if her past self sees her future self, everything will be history. As Alice sets out, she ends up in a dreary castle, where Time himself, a demigod that is part-human, part-clock, resides. As Alice tries to consult Time, she finds the Chronosphere, an object that powers all time in Wonderland and will allow her to travel to any time in the past.

Alice ignores Time’s warning that the past is unchangeable, and steals the Chronosphere, shortly after finding Iracebeth of Crims, the exiled Red Queen, in the care of Time. Alice accidentally flies to the day of Iracebeth’s coronation, where a younger Mad Hatter mocks the Red Queen when the royal crown doesn’t fit on her abnormally large head. This causes Iracebeth to melt down, and her father deems her emotionally unqualified to rule and passes the title of queen to her younger sister, the White Queen.

Alice learns of an event in Iracebeth’s and Mirana’s past that caused friction between the two and travels back in time again, hoping it will change Iracebeth’s ways and stop the Jabberwocky from killing the Hatter’s family. She learns that the hat that the Mad Hatter thought his father threw away was actually treasured by him. Meanwhile, at the White Queen and Red Queen’s castle, at the time they are children, Mirana steals a tart from her mother and eats it. When confronted by their mother, Mirana lies about eating the tart, and Iracebeth is accused, causing her to run out of the castle. Alice sees that Iracebeth is about to run into a clock, thinking that’s the event that deforms her head and personality. Alice prevents that collision but fails to change the past, as Iracebeth trips and slams her head into a stone wall instead.

A weakened Time then confronts Alice after relentless searching, and scolds her for putting all of time in danger. Out of panic, Alice runs into a nearby mirror back in the real world, where she wakes up in a mental hospital, diagnosed with female hysteria. As Dr. Addison Bennett, a psychiatric doctor, tries to inject her with a sedative, with her mother Helen’s encouragement and help, she escapes and returns to Wonderland via the mirror, where she travels to Horevendush Day, when the Hightopp family was killed. Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter’s family was captured by the Red Queen instead and never died. Returning to the present, however, Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter is on the brink of death.

Alice, close to tears, says that she believes him, and Tarrant transforms back to his normal self. The Wonderlandians go to the Red Queen’s new organic plant castle, where the Mad Hatter finds his family shrunk and trapped in an ant farm. However, the Red Queen apprehends them and steals the Chronosphere from Alice. Ignoring Time’s warning, she takes her sister back to the day she lied about the tart. By the time the Mad Hatter and Alice get there, the Red Queen and her younger self have seen each other. Time becomes a paradox, and Wonderland begins to freeze in rust. As a powerless Time’s pleas, Alice and the Mad Hatter, with the White Queen and now-frozen Red Queen, use the Chronosphere to race back to the present as the rust proceeds to spread all over the ocean of Time and the castle, where Alice places the Chronosphere in its original place in time.

With the Chronosphere stabilized, Wonderland, including those frozen, are reverted to normal. The Mad Hatter reunites with his family, and the White Queen and Red Queen make amends, while Time forgives Alice for the trouble she caused, but forbids her to return. Alice bids farewell to her friends and returns to the real world through another mirror. Alice finds her mother, Helen, about to sign over the Wonder to Hamish and reassures her that it’s only a ship. Helen decides to support her daughter regardless. Hamish seizes the Kingsleigh family home but not the ship. Alice and her mother set out to travel the world together with their own shipping company.

Cast[edit]

Voice cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Tall ships in Gloucester Docks for the filming of Alice Through the Looking Glass. August 2014

The film was announced via Variety in December 2012.[11] Bobin was first approached about the project while doing post-production work on Muppets Most Wanted,[12] Of being asked, Bobin has said that “I just couldn’t pass it up”, as he has a passion for the works of Lewis Carroll as well as history in general.[13] In July 2013, it was announced that Johnny Depp would return as the Hatter,[14] with Mia Wasikowska‘s return confirmed the following November.[15] In January 2014 Sacha Baron Cohen joined the cast to play Time.[16] In May 2014, Rhys Ifansjoined the cast to play Zanik Hightopp, the Mad Hatter’s father.[17] In developing the character of “Time”, Bobin sought to avoid creating a “straight-up bad guy”, noting that it would be “a bit dull”, and also that the role in that universe already existed in the form of The Red Queen.[12] Instead, Bobin sought to make Time a “Twit”, further explaining that “There’s no one better at playing the confident idiot trope than Sacha Baron Cohen”, and adding that “it was very much with Sacha in mind”.[12]

Principal photography began on August 4, 2014, at Shepperton Studios.[18] In August 2014, filming took place in Gloucester Docks, which included the use of at least four historic ships: Kathleen and MayIreneExcelsior, and the Earl of Pembroke, the last of which was renamed The Wonder for filming.[19][20][21][22][23] Principal photography ended on October 31, 2014.[24]

Soundtrack[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Film score by Danny Elfman
Released May 27, 2016
Recorded 2016
Studio Abbey Road Studios
Genre Orchestralpop rock
Length 76:53
Label Walt Disney
Producer Danny Elfman
Danny Elfman film scores chronology
Goosebumps
(2015)
Alice Through the Looking Glass
(2016)
Before I Wake
(2016)
Singles from Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
9.      “Just Like Fire
Released: April 15, 2016

10.   “Alice”
Released: May 27, 2016

11.   “Saving the Ship”
Released: May 27, 2016

12.   “Looking Glass”
Released: June 1, 2016

13.   “Truth”
Released: July 28, 2016

14.   “Story of Time”
Released: August 7, 2016

15.   “The Red Queen”
Released: October 18, 2016

16.   “The Chronosphere”
Released: October 20, 2016

The film’s score was composed by Danny Elfman. The soundtrack was released on May 27, 2016, by Walt Disney RecordsPinkrecorded the song “Just Like Fire” for the film, and also covered Jefferson Airplane‘s “White Rabbit“, only used in the film’s promotional material.

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Danny Elfman.

No. Title Length
1. “Alice” 6:35
2. “Saving the Ship” 3:40
3. “Watching Time” 5:10
4. “Looking Glass” 3:30
5. “To the Rescue” 0:56
6. “Hatter House” 3:47
7. “The Red Queen” 2:29
8. “The Chronosphere” 4:15
9. “Warning Hightopps” 2:23
10. “Tea Time Forever” 1:45
11. “Oceans of Time” 1:15
12. “Hat Heartbreak” 2:27
13. “Asylum Escape” 4:06
14. “Hatter’s Deathbed” 3:22
15. “Finding the Family” 2:04
16. “Time Is Up” 4:24
17. “World’s End” 1:50
18. “Truth” 4:09
19. “Goodbye Alice” 2:13
20. “Kingsleigh & Kingsleigh” 1:19
21. “Seconds Song” 0:11
22. “Friends United” 1:06
23. “Time’s Castle” 1:49
24. “The Seconds” 1:55
25. “Clock Shop” 0:50
26. “They’re Alive” 2:23
27. “Story of Time” 3:03
28. Just Like Fire” (performed by Pink) 3:35
Total length: 76:53

Release[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released on May 27, 2016, in the United States by Walt Disney Pictures.

Home media[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass was released on Blu-ray, DVD and digital download on October 18, 2016, by Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment.[25][26] It debuted at No. 2 in the Blu-ray Disc sales charts.[27]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $77 million in the United States and Canada and $222.4 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $299.5 million, against a budget of $170 million.[1]

North America[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass opened in the United States and Canada on May 27, 2016, alongside X-Men: Apocalypse, and was initially projected to gross $55–60 million from 3,763 theaters over its four-day Memorial Day opening weekend, but projections were continuously revised downwards due to poor word of mouth.[28] It had the added benefit of playing in over 3,100 3D theaters, 380 IMAX screens, 77 premium large formats and 79 D-box locations.[29][30] It made $1.5 million from Thursday previews (to the first film’s $3.9 million)[31] and just $9.7 million on its first day, compared to the $41 million opening Friday of its predecessor.[32] Through its opening weekend, it earned $27 million, which when compared to its predecessor’s $116 million opening is down 70%.[28] While 3D represented 71% ($82 million) of the original film’s opening gross, 3D constituted only 41% ($11 million) for this sequel, with 29% coming from traditional 3D shows, 11% from IMAX, and 1% from premium large formats.[33] It became the studio’s third Memorial Day opening flop following Tomorrowland in 2015 and Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time in 2010.[33] During its first week, the film grossed $40.1 million.[34] In its second weekend, the film grossed $11.3 million (a 55.1% drop), finishing 4th at the box office.[35]

Other countries[edit]

The film was released across 43 countries (72% of its total market place) the same weekend as the US, and was estimated to gross $80–100 million in its opening weekend. It faced competition from Warcraft and X-Men: Apocalypse.[36] It ended up grossing $62.7 million, which is well below the projections of which $4.1 million came from IMAX shows.[37] It had an opening weekend gross in Mexico ($4.5 million), Brazil ($4.1 million), and Russia ($3.9 million).[37] In the United Kingdom and Ireland, it had an unsuccessful opening by grossing just £2.23 million ($3.1 million) during its opening weekend, a mere 21% of the first film’s £10.56 million ($15.2 million) opening from 603 theaters. It debuted in second place behind X-Men: Apocalypse which was on its second weekend of play.[38] In China, it had an opening day of an estimated $7.3 million[39] and went on to score the second biggest Disney live-action (non-Marvel or Lucasfilm) opening ever with $26.6 million, behind only The Jungle Book.[37] However, this was down from its $35–45 million projections.[40] It debuted at the No. 1 spot among newly released film in Japan with $5.2 million and $4.1 million on Saturday and Sunday. By comparison, the first film opened with $14 million on its way to a $133.6 million a total.[41][42]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 29% based on 234 reviews, and an average rating of 4.6/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Alice Through the Looking Glass is just as visually impressive as its predecessor, but that isn’t enough to cover for an underwhelming story that fails to live up to its classic characters.”[43] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 34 out of 100 based on 42 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[44] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “A–” on an A+ to F scale, the same grade earned by its predecessor.[45]

Stephen Holden of The New York Times wrote in his review, “What does all this have to do with Lewis Carroll? Hardly anything” and that overall, “It’s just an excuse on which to hang two trite overbearing fables and one amusing one”.[46] Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the movie 1.5 out of 4 stars and called the film, “gaudy, loud, complacent, and vulgar.”[47]Stephen Whitty of New York Daily News called the film “hugely expensive and extravagantly stupid” and that, overall, the movie “is just one more silly Hollywood mashup, an innocent fantasy morphed into a noisy would-be blockbuster”.[48]

Matt Zoller Seitz of RogerEbert.com was deeply critical of Through the Looking Glass, describing it as “the most offensive kind of film…one that spends an enormous amount of money yet seems to have nothing on its mind but money. You give it, they take it. And you get nothing in return but assurances that you’re seeing magic and wonder. The movie keeps repeating it in your ear, and flashing it onscreen in big block letters: MAGIC AND WONDER. MAGIC AND WONDER. But there is no magic, no wonder, just junk rehashed from a movie that was itself a rehash of Lewis Carroll, tricked out with physically unpersuasive characters and landscapes and ‘action scenes’, with blockbuster ‘journey movie’ tropes affixed to every set-piece as blatantly as Post-It Notes.”[49]

Kyle Smith of New York Post gave the film a positive review: “The screenplay (by Linda Woolverton) isn’t exactly heaving with brilliant ideas, but it works well enough as a blank canvas against which the special-effects team goes bonkers”.[50] Matthew Lickona of San Diego Reader said that while he found the visual effects to be “stupidly expensive” and the story familiar, he called it, “a solid kids’ movie in the old style”.[51]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Category Recipient(s) Result Ref(s)
Golden Raspberry Awards Worst Prequel, Remake, Rip-off or Sequel Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [52]
Worst Supporting Actor Johnny Depp
Worst Screen Combo Johnny Depp and His Vomitously Vibrant Costume
Golden Trailer Awards Best Animation Family “Poem” [53]
The Don LaFontaine Award for Best Voice Over “Poem”
Best Fantasy Adventure TV Spot “Grammys”
Best Original Score TV Spot “Grammys”
Grammy Awards Best Song Written For Visual Media Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max MartinPink and Shellback [54]
Hollywood Music in Media Awards Best Song – Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film “Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max Martin, Pink and Shellback Won [55][56]
People’s Choice Awards Favorite Family Movie Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [57]
Satellite Awards Best Art Direction and Production Design Dan Hennah [58]
Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood
Saturn Awards Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood [59]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Music: Song from a Movie or TV Show “Just Like Fire” by Pink [60]
Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

 

Here’s who won big at Sunday night’s 90th Academy Awards.

Actress:

Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (WINNER)
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Actor:

Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour” (WINNER)
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Director:

“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro (WINNER)
“Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan
“Get Out,” Jordan Peele
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson

Original Song:

“Remember Me” from “Coco,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez (WINNER)
“Mighty River” from “Mudbound,” Mary J. Blige
“Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name,” Sufjan Stevens
“Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall,” Diane Warren, Common
“This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman,” Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

Original Score:

“The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat (WINNER)
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” John Williams (saw)
“Dunkirk,” Hans Zimmer
“Phantom Thread,” Jonny Greenwood
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Carter Burwell

Cinematography:

“Blade Runner 2049,” Roger Deakins (WINNER) (saw)
“Darkest Hour,” Bruno Delbonnel
“Dunkirk,” Hoyte van Hoytema
“Mudbound,” Rachel Morrison
“The Shape of Water,” Dan Laustsen

Original Screenplay:

“Get Out,” Jordan Peele (WINNER)
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Martin McDonagh
“The Big Sick,” Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor

Adapted Screenplay:

“Call Me by Your Name,” James Ivory (WINNER)
“The Disaster Artist,” Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber
“Logan,” Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green
“Molly’s Game,” Aaron Sorkin
“Mudbound,” Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

Live Action Short Film:

“The Silent Child,” Chris Overton, Rachel Shenton (WINNER)
“DeKalb Elementary,” Reed Van Dyk
“The Eleven O’Clock,” Derin Seale, Josh Lawson
“My Nephew Emmett,” Kevin Wilson, Jr.
“Watu Wote/All of Us,” Katja Benrath, Tobias Rosen

Documentary Short Subject:

“Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” Frank Stiefel (WINNER)
“Heroin(e),” Elaine McMillion Sheldon, Kerrin Sheldon
“Edith+Eddie,” Laura Checkoway, Thomas Lee Wright
“Knife Skills,” Thomas Lennon
“Traffic Stop,” Kate Davis, David Heilbroner

Sound Editing:

“Dunkirk,” Alex Gibson, Richard King (WINNER)
“Baby Driver,” Julian Slater  saw
“Blade Runner 2049,” Mark Mangini, Theo Green
“The Shape of Water,” Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Ren Klyce, Matthew Wood

Sound Mixing:

“Dunkirk,” Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo (WINNER)
“Baby Driver,” Mary H. Ellis, Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin
“Blade Runner 2049,” Mac Ruth, Ron Bartlett, Doug Hephill
“The Shape of Water,” Glen Gauthier, Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Stuart Wilson, Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick

Documentary Feature:

“Icarus,” Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan (WINNER)
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” Steve James, Mark Mitten, Julie Goldman
“Faces Places,” JR, Agnès Varda, Rosalie Varda
“Last Men in Aleppo,” Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed, Soren Steen Jepersen
“Strong Island,” Yance Ford, Joslyn Barnes

Costume Design:

“Phantom Thread,” Mark Bridges (WINNER)
“Beauty and the Beast,” Jacqueline Durran
“Darkest Hour,” Jacqueline Durran
“The Shape of Water,” Luis Sequeira
“Victoria and Abdul,” Consolata Boyle

Makeup and Hairstyling:

“Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick (WINNER)
“Victoria and Abdul,” Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard
“Wonder,” Arjen Tuiten

Foreign Language Film:

“A Fantastic Woman” (Chile) (WINNER)
“The Insult” (Lebanon)
“Loveless” (Russia)
“On Body and Soul (Hungary)
“The Square” (Sweden)

Production Design:

“The Shape of Water,” Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, Shane Vieau (WINNER)
“Beauty and the Beast,” Sarah Greenwood; Katie Spencer
“Blade Runner 2049,” Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola
“Darkest Hour,” Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
“Dunkirk,” Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis

Supporting Actor:

Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (WINNER)
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”

Supporting Actress:

Allison Janney, “I, Tonya” (WINNER)
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Best Picture:

“Call Me by Your Name”
√“Darkest Hour”

Purpose: Movie List

 

Keep daily track of all movies watched, including title, main actors, and plot synopsis and mini review, include in daily journal and copy to Movie list.  Use in conjunction with book read list to keep track of books and movies read and watched.  Also plays attended and TV movie events.

 

Also note when something is well written or produced and lesions I can learn for my own writing projects.  This year watch more Korean movies and TV and occasional Spanish or Bollywood movies as well as usual mix of SF, Thrillers, and comedies. Diversity the list a bit.

 

Part one due to length of file

 

 

List

 

  1. Once Upon a Time ABC mini-series a
  2. Taken Earth c
  3. Alice Through the Looking Glass b
  4. The Vault c too scary a movie
  5. GORA Turkish SF comedy c
  6. Pirates of the Caribbean Dead Men Tell No Tales b
  7. Cowboys Vs Dinosaurs b
  8. Enterprise complete season
  9. Frequency series
  10. Coverdale Paradox
  11. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (on plane)
  12. Kong Island of Skulls (on plane)
  13. GeoStorm (on plane)
  14. Lost and Found YS
  15. Beatriz at Dinner YSS
  16. The Expanse Netflix Original
  17. Discovery Netflix
  18. Drone Wars YS
  19. Prometheus Trap YS
  20. Blackway YS
  21. The Mermaid YS
  22. The Great Wall YS
  23. Gold
  24. King Arthur
  25. The Legend of Zoro
  26. Jumper

 

 

Plot

 

Prometheus Trap

movie data
German title Prometheus Trap
original title Prometheus Trap
production country United States
original language English
Publishing year 2012
length 89 minutes
Age rating FSK 12 [1]
Rod
direction Andrew Bellware
script Steven J. Niles
production Rebecca Kush ,
Laura Schlachtmeyer
cut Rebecca Kush
Occupation
·         Michael Shattner : Finn

·         Rebecca Kush : Haskin

·         Andrew J. Langton : Rhodes

·         James Edward Becton : Cornell

·         Kate Britton : Trent

·         Sarah-Doe Osborn : Artemis

Prometheus Trap is an American low-budget – science fiction film from the year 2012 . Directed by Andrew Bellware , the script was written by Steven J. Niles . The film is about the crew of two spaceships that enter a time warp during an interstellar war.

Table of Contents

[ Hide ]

Action [ edit Edit ]

The two-headed crew of the spaceship Venon is woken up by ship’s drift Finn from deep sleep; they are to recover the damaged spaceship Prometheus, which transports a decisive weapon in the bitter war between Earth and the Alliance of Colony Worlds. In the alliance ship Prometheus, the three-member crew of the Venon finds the bodies of six of the eight crew members as well as the ship’s droid Artemis, which behaves strangely; she anticipates the sentences of the boarded crew of the Venon, so to speak. Finn should try to get something out of Artemis; Captain Haskin and her assistant discover two survivors in deep sleep. There are indications that there is a saboteur on board. Everything seems to point to the ship’s droid; the earth-born mechanic of Prometheus, Trent,

The plot then begins again with the arrival of the Venon crew on the Prometheus. But only the two androids have a memory of what happened before; Artemis seems to remember well and has resigned himself to fate; Finn always remembers fragments and wants to change the course of time, even against Artemis’s fatalism.

Criticism [ edit Edit ]

Although the film is often criticized for the lack of special effects and various inconsistencies in the script, he was able to attract an interested, if not enthusiastic audience. [2]

The film service says Prometheus Trap is a “reasonably priced Star War game – at school-theater level, using the darkness in space” to conceal its cheap effects. ” [3]

Web links

 

Certificate: PG  Rating: 3

Synopsis

While spending the summer with their uncle (Jason Patric) on a remote island, teenager Andy (Justin Kelly) and his brother Mark (Benjamin Stockham) learn that their eccentric grandfather left behind a vast fortune. But to find it, they must embark on an elaborate treasure hunt that will take them into the island’s deepest and darkest corners. Suspense and mystery abound in a family adventure made in the finest tradition of The Hardy Boys.

 

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Burn Country
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ian Olds
Produced by Jennifer Glynn
Caroline von Kuhn
Screenplay by Ian Olds
Paul Felten
Starring James Franco
Melissa Leo
Rachel Brosnahan
Dominic Rains
Thomas Jay Ryan
James Oliver Wheatley
Music by Jim McHugh
Cinematography Adam Newport-Berra
Edited by Scott Cummings
Joe Murphy
Ian Olds
Production
company
ACE Productions
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Samuel Goldwyn Films
Release date ·         April 16, 2016 (Tribeca Film Festival)

·         December 9, 2016 (United States)

Running time 102 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English

Burn Country is a 2016 American drama film directed by Ian Olds and written by Ian Olds and Paul Felten. The film stars James FrancoMelissa LeoRachel BrosnahanDominic RainsThomas Jay Ryan and James Oliver Wheatley. The film was released on December 9, 2016, by Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films.

Contents

[hide]

Cast[edit]

Release[edit]

The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 16, 2016.[1][2] The film was released on December 9, 2016, by Orion Picturesand Samuel Goldwyn Films.[3]

 Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valerian and the City
of a Thousand Planets
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Luc Besson
Produced by ·         Luc Besson

·         Virginie Besson-Silla

Screenplay by Luc Besson
Based on Valérian and Laureline
by Pierre Christin
Jean-Claude Mézières
Starring ·         Dane DeHaan

·         Cara Delevingne

·         Clive Owen

·         Rihanna

·         Ethan Hawke

·         Herbie Hancock

·         Kris Wu

·         Rutger Hauer

Music by Alexandre Desplat[1]
Cinematography Thierry Arbogast
Edited by Julien Rey
Production
company
·         EuropaCorp[2]

·         TF1 Films Production

·         Fundamental Films

·         BNP Paribas

·         Orange Studio

·         Novo Pictures

·         River Road Entertainment

·         Belga Films Fund

Distributed by ·         EuropaCorp Distribution
(France)

·         STXfilms
(United States)

Release date ·         17 July 2017 (Grauman’s Chinese Theatre)

·         21 July 2017 (United States)

·         26 July 2017 (France)

Running time 137 minutes[3]
Country France
China
United States
Belgium[4]
Language English
Budget ·         €197 million (gross)[5]
(~$209 million)[6]

·         $177–205 million (net)[6][7][8]

Box office $225.9 million[9]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (FrenchValérian et la Cité des mille planètes) is a 2017 English-language 3D space opera film[10] written and directed by Luc Besson, and co-produced by Besson and his wife, Virginie Besson-Silla. The film is based on the French science fiction comics series Valérian and Laureline, written by Pierre Christin and illustrated by Jean-Claude Mézières. It stars Dane DeHaan as Valerian and Cara Delevingne as Laureline, with Clive OwenRihannaEthan HawkeHerbie HancockKris Wu and Rutger Hauer in supporting roles. Besson independently crowd-sourced and personally funded Valerian. With a production budget of around $180 million, it is both the most expensive non-American and independent film ever made.[11]

Valerian was released by STXfilms on 21 July 2017 in the United States, and in France on 26 July, by EuropaCorp.[12][13] It received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized the plot and some of the casting, but praised the visuals. It grossed $225 million worldwide,[14] but due to its high production and advertising costs, was considered a commercial failure.[15][16]

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

In the 28th century, the former International Space Station has reached critical mass, making it too dangerous to keep in Low Earth Orbit. Relocated to deep space, it became Alpha, a space-traveling city inhabited by millions of creatures from thousands of planets. A special police division is created to preserve peace through the galaxy, including happy-go-lucky Major Valerian and his partner, no-nonsense Sergeant Laureline.

En route to a mission, Valerian dreams of a planet where a low-tech humanoid race lives peacefully. They fish for pearls containing enormous amounts of energy, and use small animals to replicate them. Wreckage begins plummeting from the sky, followed by an apocalyptic explosion. Moments before her death a young princess manages to send out a telepathic signal.

Shaken, Valerian awakes. After an analysis reveals he might have received a signal from across time and space, he learns that his mission is to retrieve a “Mül converter”, so-called for being able to replicate anything it eats. It is the last of its kind, and currently in the hands of black market dealer Igon Siruss. Before setting out, Valerian asks Laureline to marry him, but she brushes him off, due to his many affairs with female colleagues and his aversion to commitment.

Travelling to a massive extra-dimensional bazaar called Big Market, Valerian disrupts a meeting between Igon and two hooded figures who look like the humanoids from his vision. They also seek the converter, which is revealed to be one of the small animals he saw in his vision. Valerian and Laureline recover the converter, and he surreptitiously steals one of the pearls. Aboard their ship, he learns that Mül was destroyed 30 years earlier, and all information about it is classified.

They return to Alpha, where their superior, frosty Commander Arün Filitt, informs them the center of the station has been infected by an unknown force, rendering it highly toxic. Troops sent into the area have not returned, and the infection is growing. Laureline and Valerian are assigned to protect the commander during an interstation summit to discuss the crisis. Against the Commander’s wishes, Laureline maintains possession of the converter.

During the summit, the humanoids suddenly attack, incapacitating everyone before kidnapping Filitt. Valerian chases the kidnappers to the infected area and crashes his vehicle. Evading arrest for insubordination, Laureline enlists the help of some aliens to track Valerian, and finds him unconscious at the edge of the infected zone. She wakes him, but is kidnapped by a primitive imperial tribe emigrated from planet Goara[17] called “Boulan Bathors” that lives nearby. Valerian infiltrates the tribe’s territory with the help of a shape-shifting dancer, Bubble. They save Laureline and escape, but Bubble is mortally wounded. As she dies, she convinces Valerian to never give up on his feelings for Laureline.

Valerian and Laureline venture further into the infected area, realizing it is actually not toxic and contains some wrecks of antique spacecraft. They reach a large shielded hall where they find the humanoids, known as Pearls, with an unconscious Filitt. Their leader, Emperor Haban Limaï, explains that his people lived peacefully on Mül until a battle broke out in orbit between the human government’s fleet and another species. The human commander, Filitt, ordered the use of a doomsday weapon that annihilated both the enemy and the planet. Upon dying, Princess Lihö-Minaa transferred her soul into Valerian’s body. A small group of survivors took shelter in a crashed human spaceship. They managed to repair it, and learned of the humans’ technology and history. They eventually came to Alpha, where they assimilated more knowledge and built a ship that could recreate their former home. They needed only the converter and the pearl to launch the ship. Filitt admits his role in the genocide, but argues that it was necessary to end the war, and the cover-up to prevent the humans from being expelled from Alpha. Valerian and Laureline disagree, stating that the commander has only been trying to save himself from the consequences for his actions, before Valerian knocks him out again.

Valerian hands over the pearl he stole, and Laureline convinces him to return the converter too, ignoring procedures. While the Pearls’ spacecraft prepares for takeoff to no more bother the other species in Alpha, Filitt’s pre-programmed robot K-Tron soldiers attack the Pearls, the government soldiers who were sent to assist Valerian, and their support staff, but are ultimately defeated. The spacecraft departs and Filitt is arrested. Valerian and Laureline are left adrift onboard a still working Apollo Command/Service Module, which is identified by radio technicians as “Destiny 2005“, and Laureline finally accepts Valerian’s marriage proposal as they wait for rescue.

Cast[edit]

DelevingneDeHaan and Besson at the San Diego Comic-Con 2016 presentation of Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, at Camp Conival

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Although Luc Besson loved the Valerian comics growing up, he did not seriously consider adapting them into a movie until he was working on The Fifth Element. During development, Besson had tapped Valerian illustrator Jean-Claude Mézières to work on the film, who asked Besson, “Why are you doing this shitty film? Why you don’t do Valerian?”[22] At the time, Besson felt that making the film was “impossible” given the vast monster-to-human ratio.[22] The release of Avatar served as both a blessing and a curse for Besson; he has said, “technically, I could see that we can do everything now. The film proved that imagination is the only limit.” However, he also felt that “James Cameron pushed all the levels so high,” which made him believe that his script was not good enough, so he rewrote it.[22] Ultimately, the storyboarding for the film took seven months.[23]

The project was first publicly reported in 2012.[24] The two principal stars, Dane DeHaan and Cara Delevingne, were announced in May 2015.[25] On 19 August 2015, Clive Owensigned on to play Commander Arün Filitt in the film.[26] The budget, €197 million, is by far the largest ever assembled for a French film. Previously, Asterix at the Olympic Games was the most expensive, at €78 million, just ahead of Besson’s The Fifth Element (€75 million).[27] By the end of August 2015, Besson said in an RTL radio interview that shooting the film in France was too expensive. Because it was filmed in a foreign language (English), Besson was unable to benefit from tax credits, despite preferring to produce the film in France and create jobs for 1,200 crew members.[27][28] The criteria to obtain these tax credits were then adapted accordingly. In May 2015, it was announced Fundamental Films would invest US$50 million in the film.[29]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography on the film began on 5 January 2016 in seven sound stages dedicated to the film at the Cité du cinéma, in Saint-Denis, north of Paris.[23][30] In total, there are 2,734 visual effect shots.[31]

Marketing[edit]

The trailer featured the Beatles song “Because“, which marked the first time a Beatles master recording was featured in a film advertisement.[32]

Release[edit]

The first teaser for Valerian was released on 10 November 2016.[33] The teaser depicts Marmakas, Entertainers, Bagoulins, and Shingouz, who all appear in Ambassador of the Shadows. A special exclusive preview of Valerian was shown prior to the Fathom Events 4K restoration showing of The Fifth Element on 14 May and 17 May.[34][35]

Valerian was released in Israel on 20 July 2017,[36] on 21 July in the United States, on 26 July in France.[37] and on 2 August in the UK [38] Lionsgate handles the film’s release in the United Kingdom and Ireland,[39] and STX Entertainment distributes the film in the United States.[40] The film was released on 25 August 2017 in China.[41]

Home media[edit]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets was released digitally on November 7, 2017, and on Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray and DVD on November 21, 2017.[42][43]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets grossed $40.5 million in the United States and Canada and $184.7 million internationally (including $36.8 million in France), for a worldwide total of $225.2 million.[9] With a production budget around $180 million, the film would have needed to gross $400 million worldwide in order to break even and justify a sequel.[11]

In North America, Valerian opened alongside Dunkirk and Girls Trip, and was initially projected to gross $20–25 million from 3,553 theaters, although some insiders believed it would open in the teens.[14][44] It made $6.5 million on its first day, including $1.7 million from Thursday night previews at 2,600 theaters, lowering weekend projections to $16.5 million. The film ended up debuting to $17 million, finishing 5th at the box office, leading Deadline.com to already label the film a domestic box office bomb,[8] and causing a 8.31% fall of the EuropaCorp stock on the following Monday.[16] In its second weekend, the film dropped 62% to $6.4 million, finishing 8th at the box office.[45] In its third and fourth weekends the film made $2.4 million and $901,323, finishing 12th and 17th and dropping another 62% both times.[46]

Outside North America, the film opened in 16 markets alongside the US and made $6.5 million over its opening weekend, including $2.5 million in Germany.[47] In France, the film made $3.72 million (€3.19) on its first day, the second-best opening day of 2017 there behind Despicable Me 3.[48] In China, the film made $9.9 million on its first day from 78,000 screens, becoming the first film to displace Wolf Warriors 2 at the country’s box office.[49] It went on to open to $29 million, topping the box office.[50] The largest territory for the film was China, with US$62.1 million.[9]

Critical response[edit]

Valerian received mixed reviews from critics, who praised its visuals while criticizing the plot and some of the casting.[14] On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 49% based on 237 reviews, with an average rating of 5.5/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets uses sheer kinetic energy and visual thrills to overcome narrative obstacles and offer a viewing experience whose surreal pleasures often outweigh its flaws.”[51] On Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating to reviews, the film has a score of 51 out of 100, based on reviews from 45 critics, indicating “mixed or average reviews”.[52] On French entertainment information website AlloCiné, the film has an average grade of 3.0/5, based on 31 critics.[53] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B–” on an A+ to F scale.[8]

David Ehrlich of IndieWire gave the film a grade of B-, praising how “unapologetically idiosyncratic” the film is, while also saying “the vividness of this place only underscores the lifelessness of the people leading us through it …. There are 394 million stories on the City of a Thousand Planets, and Valerian’s might be the only one we’ve seen before. Still, any excuse to visit this place is one worth taking.”[54] Peter Sciretta of /Film touted the first half of Valerian as “unpredictable and bonkers insane”, while calling the second half more formulaic and “far less exciting”, though he still encouraged seeing the film in 3D “on the biggest screen possible”.[55] Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of The A.V. Club wrote that it was “rare […] to see a film this extravagant that also feels, for better or worse, like the work of a single personality. The longer action scenes may not always rank with Besson’s early ’90s highlights […] or the mania of the more recent Lucy, but there isn’t a moment in this ludicrous, lushly self-indulgent movie that doesn’t feel like its creator is having the time of his life.”[56]

Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave a negative review, saying: “The Razzies don’t need to wait until the end of the year to anoint a winner for 2017 … Hollywood studio chiefs can breathe easy that, this time, at least, they’ll escape blame for making a giant summer franchise picture that nobody wants to see, since this one’s a French import.”[57] A. O. Scott of The New York Times was also less than happy with the film, writing the effort “feels as if it were made up on the spot, by someone so delighted by the gaudy genre packaging at his disposal that he lost track of what was supposed to be inside.”[58]

Possible sequel[edit]

Despite the film being a disappointment at the box office, director Luc Besson claims a sequel is still possible due to positive fan reaction.[59]

 

Movie Two  Kong Skull Island

 

Kong: Skull Island

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For the ride at Islands of Adventure, see Skull Island: Reign of Kong.

Kong: Skull Island
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts
Produced by
Screenplay by
Story by
Based on King Kong
by Merian C. Cooper
Edgar Wallace
Starring
Music by Henry Jackman
Cinematography Larry Fong
Edited by Richard Pearson
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date
Running time 118 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $185 million[2]
Box office $566.7 million[3]

Kong: Skull Island is a 2017 American monster film directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts and written by Dan GilroyMax Borenstein, and Derek Connolly from a story by John Gatins. The film is a reboot of the King Kong franchise and serves as the second film in Legendary‘s MonsterVerse. The film stars an ensemble cast consisting of Tom HiddlestonSamuel L. JacksonJohn GoodmanBrie LarsonJing TianToby KebbellJohn OrtizCorey HawkinsJason MitchellShea WhighamThomas MannTerry Notary, and John C. Reilly. Set in 1973, the film follows a team of scientists and a US Army unit recently withdrawn from the Vietnam War who travel to an uncharted island in the Pacific and encounter terrifying creatures and the mighty Kong.

Principal photography took place from October 2015 to March 2016 in Hawaii and various locations around VietnamKong: Skull Island premiered on February 28, 2017, in London and was released in the United States on March 10, 2017, in 2D, 3D, IMAX 3D, in Dolby Cinemas and in 70mm. The film was a critical and commercial success,[4][5] grossing over $566 million worldwide against its $185 million budget. The film received a nomination for Best Visual Effects at the 90th Academy Awards. A crossover sequel, Godzilla vs. Kong, is set for release on May 22, 2020.

Contents

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Plot[edit]

In 1944, in the midst of World War II, two fighter pilots – American pilot Hank Marlow and Japanese pilot Gunpei Ikari – parachute onto an island in the South Pacific after a dogfight and engage in close combat, but the fight is interrupted by a giant ape that appears.

Twenty-nine years later, in 1973, U.S. government agent Bill Randa hires former British Special Air Service Captain James Conrad, a skilled tracker, to guide an expedition to map out a recently discovered island known as Skull Island. Their military escort is the Sky Devils, a US Army helicopter squadron newly returned from the Vietnam War and led by Lieutenant Colonel Preston Packard and his subordinates, Major Jack Chapman and Captain Earl Cole. The group is joined by pacifist photojournalist Mason Weaver, who believes the expedition is a secret military operation. Upon arrival at Skull Island, Packard’s men begin dropping explosives developed by seismologist Houston Brooks to map out the island. However, the air unit is attacked by the same giant ape from 1944, who kills a number of military personnel and scatters the survivors across the island.

Packard regroups with some of the scattered survivors, including his door gunner Reles, pilot Glenn Mills, Cole, Landsat employee Steve Woodward, and Randa. After being confronted by Packard, Randa reveals his affiliation to the secret government organization Monarch, and using the expedition to prove the existence of monsters and determine their threat to humanity. Packard’s group begins making their way to Chapman, whose helicopter crash-landed elsewhere, while the other group of survivors (Conrad, Weaver, Brooks, biologist San Lin, soldier Reg Slivko, and Landsat employee Victor Nieves) try to get to a rendezvous point to meet a resupply team arriving in three days’ time, as all the survivors have various encounters with the island’s creatures. Conrad’s group encounter the local Iwi natives and an older Marlow. He reveals that the ape is Kong, the island’s guardian, worshiped as a god by the natives for protecting them from many predators, including reptilian underground monsters dubbed “Skullcrawlers”. He informs them that Kong attacked and destroyed the air unit because their seismology explosives brought Skullcrawlers to the surface; the Skullcrawlers are responsible for killing Kong’s ancestors, leaving him as the last of his kind, although he is still growing. Marlow also tells them that he and Ikari became friends, but Ikari was killed by a Skullcrawler some time ago.

Chapman is ambushed and eaten by a Skullcrawler, while Conrad’s group helps Marlow complete a boat built from parts scavenged from Marlow and Ikari’s downed planes. They ride the boat down the river, and manage to secure communication with Packard’s group, but the boat is attacked by pterosaur-like creatures which kill Nieves. They regroup with Packard, who insists on searching for Chapman, though his true objective is to find and kill Kong, who he perceives as an enemy due to killing his men.

Marlow leads the two groups to a mass grave littered with the bones of Kong’s kin. There, a Skullcrawler attacks the group, killing Randa and many soldiers before dying in a flammable gas explosion triggered by Weaver. Learning about Chapman’s death, (when the Skullcrawler vomits Chapman’s skull and dogtags) a vengeful Packard blames Kong for the deaths of his men and becomes even more determined to kill him. The two groups part ways, with Packard’s group laying a trap for Kong at a nearby lake, while the non-military personnel head back to the boat. While scouting the path ahead, Conrad and Weaver encounter Kong up-close and, seeing his true benevolent nature, they resolve to save him.

As Conrad and Weaver encounter Kong, Packard’s group uses the remaining seismic explosives to lure him in. Kong charges to the lake, where they incapacitate him with ignited napalm, though Woodward is killed. Conrad, Weaver and Marlow arrive and persuade the other soldiers to spare Kong, but Packard refuses to stand down. A massive Skullcrawler emerges from the lake and Packard is crushed to death by a recovering Kong. The Skullcrawler overpowers Kong and chases the humans. Cole is killed in a failed suicide bomb attempt to kill it, but Kong returns to rescue the others and battle the beast, and is aided by the survivors. Weaver is knocked into the marsh during the fight but Kong saves her from drowning. The Skullcrawler then tries to kill Kong and eat Weaver, but Kong successfully kills it by ripping out its innards, and allows the survivors to leave the island.

During the credits, Marlow is shown returning home, reuniting with his wife, meeting his son for the first time, and watching a Chicago Cubs game on television.

In a post-credits scene, Conrad and Weaver are detained by Monarch. They are informed by Brooks and San that Skull Island is just the beginning and that Kong is not the only monster king to roam the world. As proof, they are shown archive footage of cave paintings depicting the monsters GodzillaRodanMothraKing Ghidorah, and finally a battle between Godzilla and King Ghidorah. And as the film cuts to black, the sound of Godzilla’s roar is heard.

Cast[edit]

  • Tom Hiddleston as James Conrad, a former British Special Air Service Captain who served in the Vietnam War with the Special Air Service Regiment, hired as a hunter-tracker for the expedition by Randa.[6] Hiddleston described his character as a man who holds “no political allegiance in the conflict” but “understands conflict”, further stating, “He’s a former soldier who has been formed by an understanding of war, but his specific skill set is something that’s attached to the power of nature; and I think that’s something people haven’t seen in a long time”.[7]
  • Samuel L. Jackson as Preston Packard, a United States Army Lieutenant Colonel and leader of the Sky Devils helicopter squadron, assigned to escort the group of explorers on the expedition. Jackson compares his character to Captain Ahab from Moby-Dick, stating, “He does have to exact some measure of revenge for the people he’s lost. That’s just the nature of how we operate—eye for an eye!”.[7]
  • John Goodman as William “Bill” Randa, a senior official in the government organization Monarch, who is in charge of the expedition.
  • Brie Larson as Mason Weaver, a photojournalist and peace activist. Larson stated that her character has her “own sort of motive” as to why she joined the expedition: “That’s the interesting thing about this movie. It’s a group of misfits that are all coming from different angles looking at the same thing. You get to see how many different views in regards to nature and how we should handle it are dealt with from many different perspectives”.[7] Larson further added that Weaver has an “interest and respect for nature” and “Through that she has a closer, more loving, and intimate relationship with Kong”.[7]
  • Corey Hawkins as Houston Brooks, a geologist and Yale University graduate, recruited for the expedition by Monarch for his groundbreaking theories on seismology.[8]
  • Toby Kebbell as Jack Chapman, a United States Army major and Sea Stallion helicopter pilot who is Packard’s right hand man.[8]
  • John Ortiz as Victor Nieves, a senior Landsat official on the expedition.
  • Jing Tian as San Lin, a biologist working for Monarch. According to Vogt-Roberts and Borenstein, her role was originally larger but had been reduced. Alison de Souza of the Straits Times wrote that in the final film Jing Tian’s role would be described in Chinese as a “hua ping” (花瓶), meaning a vase, which refers to insignificant roles, and that she “hardly does or says a thing.”[9]
  • Jason Mitchell as Glenn Mills, a warrant officer and helicopter pilot of the Sky Devils and close friend of Cole.
  • Shea Whigham as Earl Cole, a seasoned Captain of the Sky Devils who wields an AK-47 instead of an M16 and close friend of Mills.
  • Thomas Mann as Reg Slivko, a warrant officer of the Sky Devils, known for carrying a portable record player.
  • Terry Notary and Toby Kebbell[10] as King Kong (motion capture performance), a 104-foot-tall ape who is worshiped as the king and god on Skull Island by the Iwi natives.[11] Notary stated that this Kong is an adolescent and he tried to play Kong like a “14 year old that’s trapped in the life of an adult”, stating that it took three days to film the motion capture scenes.[12] In addition to playing Chapman, Toby Kebbell also provided some facial references for Kong, stating, “I gave some facial reference — certain subtleties, certain looks. Terry and I worked on stuff together and created what Kong needed. I was just there as backup for pieces that Terry really wanted to get details on. It’s a real honor to be asked by someone who’s a great performer, to come and help support their performance.”[13]
  • John C. Reilly as Hank Marlow, a U.S. Army Air Forces lieutenant of the 45th Pursuit Squadron who has been stranded for nearly 29 years on Skull Island since World War II. He knows the creatures of the island, and is a friend of the Iwi natives. Will Brittain portrays a young Hank Marlow, and also plays Marlow’s son.

Additionally, Eugene Cordero appears as Reles, a warrant officer of the Sky Devils and Packard’s door gunnerMarc Evan Jackson portrays Steve Woodward, a Landsat employee on the expedition; Richard Jenkins portrays Senator Al Willis, a politician who reluctantly funds the expedition; and Miyavi portrays Gunpei Ikari, a Japanese World War II pilot who crash-lands on Skull Island alongside Marlow.

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Initially announced by Legendary Pictures at the 2014 San Diego Comic-ConUniversal Pictures was to be the distributor.[14] Legendary then moved the project to Warner Bros. in order to develop a crossover film featuring King Kong and Godzilla.[15][16][17]

Legendary offered Joe Cornish the job of directing the film,[18] while Peter Jackson, who directed the 2005 version of King Kong, suggested Guillermo del Toro, who Legendary worked with on Pacific Rimand Crimson Peak.[19] In September 2014, the studio announced that Jordan Vogt-Roberts would direct the film.[20]

The script saw a number of screenwriters attached before filming. Seeking the continuity between the King Kong and Godzilla worlds, Max Borenstein (writer of 2014’s Godzilla) wrote the first draft, while John Gatins was hired to write the second draft.[21] Borenstein’s initial influence was Apocalypse Now, revealing, “What popped into my head for the paradigm of the movie was Apocalypse Now. That’s obviously a war movie, but I liked the idea of people moving upriver to face a misunderstood force that they think of as a villain, but ultimately they come to realize is much more complicated.”[22] It was later revealed that Dan Gilroy had also collaborated on the Borenstein and Gatins draft.[23] On August 18, 2015, it was confirmed that Derek Connolly was also doing script rewrites.[24] Borenstein worked a final pass on the screenplay before shooting began, and credited the screenplay to all of the writers, saying, “It was definitely collaborative in terms of what’s on the screen, though none of us worked together. There are pieces of my work in there as well as the work of the other two writers and John Gatins, who was credited for story. Everybody had a really good hand in it.”[22]

In April 2016, artist Joe DeVito sued producers of the film for using elements of his Skull Island universe, which he claimed that he created and the producers used without his permission.[25]

Creature design[edit]

Kong as designed for Kong: Skull Island

Director Vogt-Roberts stated that he wanted Kong to look simple and iconic enough that a third grader could draw him, and the image would still be recognizable.[26] Vogt-Roberts also wanted Kong to feel like a “lonely god, he was a morose figure, lumbering around this island,” and took the design back to the 1933 incarnation, where Kong was presented as a “bipedal creature that walks in an upright position.”[26] Vogt-Roberts additionally stated, “If anything, our Kong is meant to be a throwback to the ’33 version. [Kong] was a movie monster, so we worked really hard to take some of the elements of the ’33 version, some of those exaggerated features, some of those cartoonish and iconic qualities, and then make them their own…We created something that to some degree served as a throwback to the inspiration for what started all of this, but then also [had] it be a fully unique and different creature that — I would like to think — is fully contained and identifiable as the 2017 version of King Kong. I think there are very modern elements to him, yet hopefully he feels very timeless at the same time.”[26]

Hayao Miyazaki‘s Princess Mononoke helped influence the design and approach of the monsters, Vogt-Roberts stated, “Miyazaki[‘s] Princess Mononoke was actually a big reference in the way that the spirit creatures sort of have their own domains and fit within that. So a big thing [was] trying to design creatures that felt realistic and could exist in an ecosystem that feels sort of wild and out there, and then also design things that simultaneously felt beautiful and horrifying at the same time.”[7] However, biophysical analysis of Kong and other creatures concludes that although biophysically they are viable, the ecosystem of the island could not support them.[27]

The two-armed pit lizard from the 1933 King Kong film was used as a reference for the Skullcrawlers. They were also inspired by a number of other cinematic creatures; Vogt-Roberts stated, “That creature, beyond being a reference to a creature from the 1933 film, is also this crazy fusion of all of the influences throughout my life – like the first angel from Evangelion, and No-Face from Spirited Away, and Cubone from Pokémon.”[28]

Casting[edit]

The cast and director of Kong: Skull Island at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con to promote the film

At the same time of the announcement of Vogt-Roberts as director, the studio also announced that Tom Hiddleston would play the lead role.[20] For a time both, JK Simmons and Michael Keaton were attached to roles however both left due to scheduling difficulties. .[29][30][31] On July 23, 2015, Brie Larson was cast in the film to play the female lead.[32] On August 5, 2015, it was announced that Corey Hawkins was cast in the film to play a supporting role.[23] On August 6, 2015, Deadline.com reported that the studio was in early talks with Samuel L. Jackson to replace the role which Simmons vacated, while John C. Reilly was being eyed for Keaton’s role, but not offered it yet. Tom Wilkinson was also offered a role in the film.[33]

On August 20, 2015, Toby Kebbell joined the cast of the film, while Jackson and Reilly were confirmed for roles.[34] On August 25, 2015, Jason Mitchell joined the cast, to play a pilot.[35] On September 25, 2015, John Goodman was cast to play Randa, a government official and leader of an expedition, and Thomas Mann was also cast.[36][37] On October 1, 2015, John Ortiz and Shea Whigham were added to the cast in unspecified roles.[38] On October 13, 2015, Eugene Cordero joined the film,[39] and on November 2, 2015, it was announced Will Brittain had joined the cast, portraying a pilot, in one of the last key leads in the film.[40] In May 2016, Toby Kebbell revealed that Terry Notary would portray Kong through motion capture, and that Kebbell provided some guidance for Kong’s motion capture sequences.[8]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography on the film began on October 19, 2015, and concluded on March 18, 2016.[41] Filming took place in the northern portion of Vietnam, including Tràng An, Vân Long and Tam Cốc (Ninh Bình Province), Hạ Long Bay (Quảng Ninh Province), and at the entrance of Tú Làn Caves System (Tân Hoá, Trung Hoá Village, Minh Hoá District Quảng Bình Province), the island of Oahu in Hawaii, and Australia’s Gold Coast. Locations included Honolulu’s Chinatown, and at the Kualoa Ranch and Waikane Valley (Ohulehule Forest Conservancy) on Oahu.[42][43] In mid-January 2016, filming started in Gold CoastQueensland, Australia.[44][45]

Influences[edit]

Vogt-Roberts has cited a number of films that inspired Kong: Skull Island, stating, “If I were going to break it down for people, I’d say you obviously have Apocalypse Now and just the era of ‘70s filmmaking, with films like The Conversation, too. Also Platoon was an inspiration, and the South Korean film The Host as well. The entire Neon Genesis Evangelion series was a big influence.”[28] Vogt-Roberts also cited Princess Mononoke as an influence on the approach and design of the monsters.[7] He cited Sachiel from Neon Genesis Evangelion, Cubone from Pokémon, No-Face from Spirited Away, and a creature from the 1933 King Kong as inspirations for the Skullcrawlers.[28]

Music[edit]

The film’s score was composed by Henry Jackman. To fit the ’70s period of the film, Jackman blended ’70s psychedelic guitars into the score.[46] Regarding the music used in the film, Vogt-Roberts stated, “I wanted to use songs from the Vietnam era and a myriad of hits from the ’70s… this provides a striking dichotomy, sets the tone and gives us great moments of fun.”[46]

Release[edit]

Kong: Skull Island was originally set a release date for November 4, 2016, but in December 2014, the release date was pushed back from its original release date of November 4, 2016 to March 10, 2017. The new release date coincides with the franchise’s 84th anniversary. It was released in 3D and IMAX 3D, as well as in Dolby Vision High Dynamic Range, and Dolby Atmos sound in Dolby Cinemas and presented in 70mm.[47][48] The film premiered at the Cineworld Empire Leicester Square in London on February 28, 2017.[49][50]

Box office[edit]

Kong: Skull Island has grossed $168 million in the United States and Canada and $398.6 million in other territories for a worldwide gross of $566.6 million.[3] Made on a production budget of $185 million, with about $136 million more spent on global marketing costs, the film needed to make at least $450–500 million worldwide in order to break even.[51][52][53]

In the United States and Canada, Kong: Skull Island was projected to gross $40–50 million in its opening weekend, as well as a worldwide debut of $110–135 million.[2][54] The film made $20.2 million on its first day from 3,846 theaters, including $3.7 million it made from Thursday night previews.[55] In total, the film earned a better-than-expected $61 million on its opening weekend, defying the film’s initial projection by 35%.[56][51] In IMAX, it made $7.6 million from 382 theaters, repping 12.5% of the film’s total opening weekend.[56] In its second weekend the film grossed $27.8 million (a drop of 54.4%), finishing second at the box office behind newcomer Beauty and the Beast.[57]

Internationally, the film debuted with $85.1 million from 20,900 screens in 65 markets. It opened in every market except Japan and China. In IMAX, the film scored the fourth-biggest March release with $4.8 million from 672 theaters (the second biggest without China in it).[58] The biggest openings came from the United KingdomIreland ($7.6 million), South Korea ($7.4 million), Russia ($6.2 million), Mexico($5.7 million), France ($4.1 million), Taiwan ($3.6 million), Australia ($3.6 million), Brazil ($3.4 million), Germany ($3.4 million), Malaysia ($2.65 million), India ($2.4 million), Spain ($1.6 million) and Italy ($1.6 million), while in Vietnam (where the film was primarily shot and centered on), it scored the biggest opening of all time there with $2.5 million. This was a week following a huge model of the primate outside the theater caught on fire at the film’s premiere.[51][58] The film would eventually open in China with $71.6 million (its largest international market) and in Japan with $3.5 million, where the film was released as King Kong: Giant God of Skull Island (Kingu Kongu: Dokurotou no Kyoshin).[59] After its overseas run, the film would gross US$398 million internationally.[60]

Critical response[edit]

Kong: Skull Island received generally positive reviews from critics.[61][62] On the film review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 75% based on 313 reviews, with an average rating of 6.5/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Offering exhilarating eye candy, solid acting, and a fast-paced story, Kong: Skull Island earns its spot in the movie monster’s mythos without ever matching up to the classic original.”[63] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 62 out of 100, based on 49 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews”.[64] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B+” on an A+ to F scale.[65]

Michael Phillips of The Chicago Tribune lauded the film, giving it three-and-a-half stars out of four: “I saw little in [Vogt-Roberts’] first feature to indicate the deftness and buoyant spirit he brings to Skull Island. This time, the money’s on the screen, but it bought a really good movie, too.”[66] Mike Ryan of Uproxx gave the film a positive review, noting, “Kong: Skull Island is still a hoot. It was a movie that was not at all on my radar as something I was dying to see and yet I had way too much fun watching it. I just wished it had embraced its craziness just a little bit more. (But, yes, there’s still plenty of crazy to go around.)”[67] Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave the film a positive review as well, stating that “all the requisite elements are served up here in ideal proportion, and the time just flies by, which can rarely be said for films of this nature.”[68] Kyle Anderson of Nerdist News found the film entertaining but flawed, saying, “It’s certainly not a perfect movie, and a lot of the characters feel like sketches more than fully-fledged people, but it roars along enjoyably from start to finish.”[69]

Conversely, Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian awarded the film one out of five stars. In his negative review, he described the movie as a “fantastically muddled and exasperatingly dull quasi-update of the King Kong story.”[70] Matthew Lickona of The San Diego Reader also gave the film one out of five stars, writing: “It’s fun to watch [the monsters] in action, but on the human side, the film is clumsily written, over-cast and underacted, with only frustrated soldier Samuel L. Jackson striking the right tone of crazy amid the chaos.”[71] Chris Klimek of NPR mentions how “Kong is at its mediocre best when it pretends to be a nature documentary about Skull Island’s bizarro flora and fauna,” but lamented how “every time the movie threatens to get interesting, one of its hordes of ersatz, non-animated characters shows up and starts talking again.”[72] Anthony Lane of The New Yorker noted that what the film “yearns to be, is a pop-culture Apocalypse Now, with the human foe removed, the political parable toned down, and the gonzo elements jacked up.”[73] J.R. Jones questioned the film’s setting, saying “this Jurassic Park knockoff takes place neither in the Depression era, which gave us the original King Kong, nor in the present, when satellite photos would surely alert us to the existence of a 100-foot gorilla. Instead—and for no reason I can fathom, except perhaps the classic-rock tunes desired for the soundtrack—the story takes place in 1973, when the Vietnam war is winding down and President Nixon is being driven from office.”[74]

Several critics have commented on Larson’s role in the movie, having recently won an Oscar for Room,[75] with Michael Salfino of The Wall Street Journal remarking that “a starring role in a popcorn movie on the heels of a passion project can open up an actor to ridicule.”[76]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Date of ceremony Category Recipient(s) and nominee(s) Result Ref.
Teen Choice Awards August 13, 2017 Choice Movie: Sci-Fi Nominated
Choice Movie Actor: Sci-Fi Tom Hiddleston
Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi Brie Larson
Annie Award February 3, 2018 Outstanding Achievement for Character Animation in a Live Action Production Jance Rubinchik, Adrian Millington, Alberto Martinez Arce, Kyle Winkelman Nominated
Visual Effects Society Awards February 13, 2018 Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature Jeff White, Tom Peitzman, Stephen RosenbaumScott Benza, Michael Meinardus Pending [77]
Outstanding Animated Character in a Photoreal Feature Jakub Pistecky, Chris Havreberg, Karin Cooper, Kris Costa for “Kong”
Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature Florent Andorra, Alexis Hall, Raul Essig, Branko Grujcic
Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature Nelson Sepulveda, Aaron Brown, Paolo Acri, Shawn Mason
Academy Awards March 4, 2018 Best Visual Effects Stephen RosenbaumJeff WhiteScott Benza, Michael Meinardus Pending [78]

Home media[edit]

Kong: Skull Island was released on HD Digital on June 20, 2017, and on 4K Ultra HD, 3D Blu-ray, Blu-ray and DVD on July 18, 2017.[79] The film debuted at the top of the NPD VideoScan First Alert sales chart and the dedicated Blu-ray Disc chart for the week ending on July 23, 2017.[80] To date, Kong: Skull Island sold $37.2 million worth of DVD’s in North America.[81]

Sequel[edit]

Main article: MonsterVerse

In September 2015, Legendary moved Kong: Skull Island from Universal to Warner Bros., which sparked media speculation that Godzilla and King Kong will appear in a film together.[82][83] In October 2015, Legendary confirmed that they would unite Godzilla and King Kong in Godzilla vs. Kong, set for a release date of May 29, 2020. Legendary plans to create a shared cinematic franchise “centered around Monarch,” that “brings together Godzilla and Legendary’s King Kong in an ecosystem of other giant super-species, both classic and new.” While Legendary will maintain its home at Universal Pictures, it will continue to collaborate with Warner Bros. for the franchise.[84]

Director Jordan Vogt-Roberts had expressed interest in doing a film about Marlow and Gunpei’s time on the island, stating, “I keep joking that personally I’m more interested in doing a $30 million version of young John C. Reilly on the island. Just some weird, the odd-ball monster comedy with him and Gunpei.”[85]

Godzilla vs. Kong is scheduled to be released on May 29, 2020[86] with Adam Wingard attached to direct the film.[87

 

Movie Three  GeoStorm

Geostorm

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Geostorm
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dean Devlin[1]
Produced by
Written by
  • Dean Devlin
  • Paul Guyot
Starring
Music by Lorne Balfe
Cinematography Roberto Schaefer
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures[2]
Release date
  • October 20, 2017
Running time 109 minutes[3]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $120 million[4]
Box office $217.0 million[4]

Geostorm is a 2017 American disaster film[1] co-written, produced, and directed by Dean Devlin as his feature film directorial debut. The film stars Gerard ButlerJim SturgessEd HarrisAbbie CornishRichard SchiffAlexandra Maria LaraRobert SheehanDaniel WuEugenio Derbez, and Andy García. The plot follows a satellite designer who tries to save the world from a storm of epic proportions caused by malfunctioning climate-controlling satellites.

Principal photography began on October 20, 2014, in New OrleansLouisiana. After poor test screenings, re-shoots took place in December 2016 under executive producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and new director Danny Cannon.[5] The film is the first co-production between Skydance Media and Warner Bros. The film was released by Warner Bros. in the United States on October 20, 2017, in 2D, Real D 3D and IMAX 3D. It grossed $217 million worldwide and received negative reviews, with criticism focused on the “uninspiring” story and “lackluster” visual effects.[6]

Contents

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Plot[edit]

In 2019, following many natural disasters, an international coalition commissions a system of climate-controlling satellites called “Dutch Boy”. After Dutch Boy neutralizes a typhoon, a Senate sub-committee reprimands chief architect Jake Lawson for acting without authorization and replaces him with his brother Max, who works under Secretary of State Leonard Dekkom.

Three years later, as a UN team stationed in Afghanistan comes across a frozen village, Bakchod, an engineer working on the International Climate Space Station (ICSS) steals data from the Afghanistan satellite before being ejected into space. After convincing President Andrew Palma to conduct an investigation, Max convinces Jake to go to the ICSS to investigate. Another satellite increases temperatures in Hong Kong, causing a firenado that nearly kills Max’s college friend Cheng Long, the head of Dutch Boy’s Hong Kong department.

Jake arrives at ICSS to examine the malfunctioning satellites (which are damaged afterwards and their data erased) with station commander Ute Fassbinder and her crew. Back on Earth, Cheng discovers he has lost login access and warns Max of a global cataclysm known as a “Geostorm” if the malfunction continues. Max discovers his login access has also been revoked. Cheng flies to the United States after evading a team of mercenaries.

Outside the ICSS, Jake and Ute retrieve a hard drive which had been ejected along with the satellite engineer. They keep the hard drive secret from the crew, suspecting a traitor, and look for the source of the error but are blocked. Jake reports the findings to Max. The ICSS staff neutralize malfunctioning satellites by deliberately knocking them offline via collisions with replacement satellites. An assailant intentionally causes Cheng’s death in a traffic accident, but not before Cheng tells Max “Zeus”. Max discovers Project Zeus simulates extreme weather patterns to create a Geostorm.

Jake, Ute, and fellow crew member Dussette recover the copied log data from the dead engineer and discover a virus has wiped out everyone’s login access to that satellite. Suspecting Palma is using Dutch Boy as a weapon, Jake tells Max he needs to reboot the system, which requires the kill code, held by the President. Max asks Sarah, his girlfriend and a Secret Service agent, to help him to acquire it.

During the National Democratic Convention, Max discovers Orlando is next in line for a superstorm after Tokyo is struck by a hailstorm and Rio de Janeiro freezes over. He requests Dekkom help secure the kill code from Palma, but Dekkom instead tries to kill Max, unveiling himself as the saboteur. Max escapes and immediately informs Sarah. The two kidnap Palma to protect him from other compromised agents and secure the kill code. They escape from a stadium as a lightning storm destroys it. Amidst the chaos, Max reveals their activities to Palma. After outsmarting Dekkom’s mercenaries, Max and Sarah arrest and confront Dekkom about his intentions: to decimate America’s enemies and the line of succession, and dominate the world.

The ICSS team loses control of all operations as the virus initiates the self-destruct program. As disasters strike the world, Jake realizes software engineer Duncan is responsible. In the ensuing confrontation, Duncan accidentally shoots at the window and ejects himself into space while Jake escapes. As the crew evacuates, Jake stays behind to ensure the reboot completes. Max and Sarah escort the President to Kennedy Space Center, where they learn the kill code cannot stop the self-destruct process.

When Jake fails to unlock a door again, Ute, who stayed behind, opens the door for him. They work together to reboot the system, transferring satellite control to NASA and preventing the Geostorm. The two take shelter in a replacement satellite as the self-destruction sequence completes and send a distress signal. A nearby shuttle piloted by Hernandez picks them up. Six months later, Jake works as the head engineer for a new system of satellites, which is now administered by an international committee.

Cast[edit]

Katheryn Winnick had been cast as Olivia Lawson, Jake’s ex-wife and the mother of Hannah, but during reshoots, her role was recast with Julia Denton.

Production[edit]

The pre-production began on July 7, 2014.[8] With an initial budget of $82 million,[9] principal photography began on October 20, 2014, in New OrleansLouisiana,[10][11] and lasted through February 10, 2015.[11] Filming began on Loyola Avenue on the first day.[12] Some NASA scenes were filmed at NASA Facility in New Orleans in November 2014 and January 2015.[13][14]

After poor test screenings in December 2015, $15 million reshoots were conducted in Louisiana in early December 2016, under new producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and director Danny Cannon. Winnick’s role was recast with Julia Denton during reshoots, while new characters were added into the script.[5]

Marketing[edit]

On October 16, 2017, Warner Bros. released a prank video on its YouTube channel. In the video, a New York taxicab drives into an ice storm affected city block, much to the shock of its passengers.[15]

Release[edit]

The film was originally set for release on March 25, 2016,[16] but in August 2014, Warner cancelled this, and released Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice on that date instead.[17] On December 11, 2014, WB shifted its live-action animated film Jungle Book to 2017 and gave its previous date from March 25, 2016, then October 21, 2016, to Geostorm.[18] In September 2015, the studio again moved back the film from October 21, 2016, to January 13, 2017.[19] In June 2016, the studio announced the release had been moved back from January 13, 2017, to October 20, 2017. The film had an IMAX release.[20]

Box office[edit]

As of December 18, 2017, Geostorm has grossed $33.3 million in the United States and Canada, and $175 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $208.3 million, against a production budget of $120 million.[4]

In North America, the film was released alongside Boo 2! A Madea HalloweenThe Snowman and Only the Brave, and was expected to gross $10–12 million from 3,246 theaters in its opening weekend.[21]After not holding Thursday night preview screenings, the film made $4.2 million on Friday. It went on to debut to $13.3 million, finishing second at the box office.[22] Due to its hefty budget, the film will likely lose about $100 million.[23]

Critical response[edit]

On review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 13% based on 60 reviews and an average rating of 3.7/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Lacking impressive visuals, well-written characters, or involving drama, Geostorm aims for epic disaster-movie spectacle but ends up simply being a disaster of a movie.”[24] On Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating to reviews, the film has a weighted average score of 21 out of 100 based on reviews from 21 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[25] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “B−” on an A+ to F scale.[22]

Peter Sobczynski of RogerEbert.com gave the film one-and-a-half out of four stars, stating that “the real disappointment about [Geostorm] is that it doesn’t even work as the camp suggested by the trailer…. [T]hey lack the lavish visual pyrotechnics nor the wit or style to make any of the destruction slightly memorable.”[26] Mark Kermode of the Kermode and Mayo’s Film Review radio program stated that the film “takes stupid to a whole new level…. Honestly, and I say this, I think it’s the stupidest film I have ever seen”, emphasizing that “it’s more stupid than Angels and Demons, and that’s not a phrase I thought I’d ever say out loud”.[27]

 

 

The Cloverfield Paradox is a 2018 American science fiction horror film directed by Julius Onah, written by Oren Uziel and Doug Jung, and produced by J. J. Abrams‘s Bad Robot Productions. The film is the third installment in the Cloverfield franchise. It stars Daniel BrühlElizabeth DebickiAksel HennieGugu Mbatha-RawChris O’DowdJohn OrtizDavid Oyelowo, and Zhang Ziyi.

Under distribution by Paramount Pictures, the film had been in development since 2012, and initially had been named God Particle at that time, without being connected to the Cloverfield series. Since then, the film was confirmed to be the third film of the series, but its release had been postponed repeatedly,[2] until its surprise trailer during Super Bowl LII on February 4, 2018, with its release on Netflixoccurring the same day, immediately after the game, within two hours of the first trailer.[3]

Contents

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Plot[edit]

In the near future, Earth is suffering from a global energy crisis. The collective space agencies of the world launch the Cloverfield Station to perfect the Shepard particle accelerator, which if successful, would provide an unlimited supply of energy for Earth, but would be far too dangerous to test on Earth, some pundits arguing this would create the “Cloverfield Paradox” and open up portals to other dimensions to let monsters onto Earth. One of the crew includes Ava Hamilton, who frets about leaving her husband Michael for potentially many years; the two have struggled with the death of their children years prior which has left their relationship cold.

The crew are unable to get the accelerator working for about two years, but eventually, they are successful. However, the system overloads, causing a massive power surge on the station. When they restore basic functions, they find that Earth is nowhere to be found, and the station’s gyroscope, necessary for navigation, has gone missing. As the crew assess repairs and try to find out what happened, strange events happen all over the station. Strange noises from behind a wall lead them to find a woman named Jensen who is fused among the wires; they are able to extract her safely. Volkov fears something is under his skin, and suddenly is compelled to craft a gun, but before he can threaten the crew, he convulses and dies, with the station’s colony of worms spilling out of him. While repairing the ship, Mundy’s arm is pulled into the walls; he is rescued but his arm is severed clean off. They later find his arm elsewhere on the station, moving on its own accord. They see the arm trying to write something, leading them to dissect Volkov’s body to find the missing gyroscope. Once installed, they are able to locate Earth on the other side of the Sun, but as they receive transmissions from it, they find out that there, they believe the Cloverfield Station was destroyed during operating the Shepard. After conversing with Jensen, the crew determine they were pulled into an alternate dimension, one in which Hamilton had decided to stay on Earth with Michael and her children, with Jensen having taken her place for the Cloverfield mission; their arrival in this dimension may have caused the destruction of Cloverfield Station in this one. The strange events are all related to parts of Cloverfield Stationtrying to co-exist in the same time. Tam determines that the Shepard was not ventilated enough during its run, causing them to cross dimensions, and gives Schmidt the appropriate changes, but she is killed in a similar freak accident. While the rest of the crew agrees they need to reactivate Shepard without modification as to return them back to their dimension, Hamilton debates about staying in this one as to be with her children.

Meanwhile, on Earth, Michael learns that they have lost communication with Cloverfield Station, and that some major accident has wracked the city, and he sees signs of a giant creature off in the distance. He begins to drive to the hospital to offer his services as a doctor, but stops to help a frightened girl Molly in the ruins of a building. Learning the hospital has been destroyed, he drives Molly to an underground shelter belonging to a friend, and takes care of her wounds.

As the Cloverfield Station crew prepare to re-engage the Shepard device, diverting power from their life support systems, another strange circumstances causes Mundy to be trapped in a strong magnetic field that leads to that section of the station exploding, killing Mundy and leaving Cloverfield Station adrift in two parts connected only by a few support beams, with the accelerators still spinning dangerously. Kiel sacrifices himself to manually disengage the accelerator ring, even though it could have easily been done remotely as described by Hamilton. Hamilton makes plans to take the station’s shuttle to return to the alternate Earth with Jensen while the others continue to activate Shepard to return to their dimension and restart the power supply. However, Jensen turns on them, recovering the gun Volkov made and using it to threaten the crew and kill Monk, believing that this crew killed her own crewmates of Cloverfield Station, and wanting to make sure Shepard stays in this dimension. Hamilton eventually overpowers Jensen, takes the gun, and shoots a window, ejecting Jensen into space. Hamilton decides to return with the crew, but leaves a message to her own self in this dimension with the plans for the Shepard device, but reminding her of the value of her family. Hamilton tends to Schmidt, the only other surviving member of the crew, and they use Shepard to return home, and then make Tam’s modifications to engage Sheppard to provide the power supply as intended. The two then are forced to evacuate via shuttle to return to Earth due to the lack of life support.

Michael is contacted by the control station letting them know they are back, but could not warn them in time about the state of Earth before they evacuated Cloverfield Station. He angrily demands that Hamilton and Schmidt be told not to return to Earth. As the shuttle breaks through the cloud layer, a giant monster rears up past the clouds.

Cast[edit]

Additionally, Simon Pegg and Greg Grunberg provide voice cameos as Radio Voice and Joe respectively.

Production[edit]

The film was first announced in 2012, under the title God Particle. The subsequent closure of Paramount’s InSurge label put the film’s release in jeopardy.[4] The first hints that the film was connected to the Cloverfield brand came when a piece of the viral marketing for 10 Cloverfield Lane included a soundclip that was supposedly from the International Space Station.[5] The script pre-dates the production of that film, however.[6]

In March 2016, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and David Oyelowo were confirmed to be cast in the film.[7] In April, Variety reported that John Krasinski was in early talks to join the film to play one of the astronauts,[8] but had a possible conflict due to a commitment with a television series.[9] In May, Elizabeth Debicki,[9] Daniel Brühl,[10] Chris O’Dowd,[11] Zhang Ziyi,[11] John Ortiz,[12] and Aksel Hennie[12] were announced as members of the cast. Cinematographer Dan Mindel was confirmed to join the film from his résumé.[13]

Filming began on June 10, 2016 and wrapped on September 23, 2016.[12]

Early marketing of the film gave the following premise: “A team of astronauts aboard an international space station find themselves alone after a scientific experiment involving a particle accelerator makes the Earth vanish. When a space shuttle appears, the space station crew must fight for survival following their horrible discovery.”[14]

In January 2018, it was reported that the original plot device of a god particle may have been removed from the story.[6]

Release[edit]

The film was originally scheduled for a February 2017 release but in late 2016 it was moved to October 2017, to give more time for post-production.[15] The film was pulled from Paramount’s release schedule, but an unnamed Cloverfield film was scheduled for release in IMAX that month.[16] In July 2017, it was announced the release had been delayed another three months to February 2018.[17] In January 2018, the release was moved for a third time, to April 20, also announcing that the title God Particle had been dropped for Untitled Cloverfield Sequel, with the implication that this was due to a change in the plot device of the film’s story.[6] That same month, it was revealed that Netflix was in talks to acquire the film from Paramount. Paramount’s chairman Jim Gianopulos felt the film’s budget (which ballooned to over $40 million from an initial $5 million) was too large for the film to be profitable with a traditional theatrical release and that it still needed work done, and “while Abrams expressed an intent to get down to business in post-production, it was too little, too late”.[18]

On February 4, 2018, during Super Bowl LII, Netflix showed a TV spot that announced the film’s title and a surprise release of the film after the game.[3]

 

Cowboys Vrs Dinosaurs

After an accidental explosion at a local mine, dinosaurs emerge from the rubble to terrorize a small western town. Now, a group of gunslingers must defend their home if anyone is going to survive in a battle of cowboys versus dinosaurs.

Director:

Ari Novak

Writers:

Anthony FankhauserRafael Jordan

Stars:

Eric RobertsRib HillisCasey Fitzgerald |See full cast & crew »

 

 

 

Once Upon a Time is an American fantasy drama television series that premiered on October 23, 2011, on ABC. The show follows various fairy-tale characters who were transported to the real world and robbed of their original memories by a powerful curse. The first six seasons were set in the fictitious seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, with Emma Swan as the lead character, while the seventh takes place in a Seattle, Washington neighborhood called Hyperion Heights, with a new main narrative led by an adult Henry Mills.

It borrows elements and characters from the Disney franchise and popular Western literature, folklore, and fairy tales. Once Upon a Time was created by Lost and Tron: Legacy writers Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz.[2] For the first six seasons, the series aired on Sundays at 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT.[3] On May 11, 2017, ABC renewed the series for a 22-episode seventh season, moving to Friday 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT, which premiered on October 6, 2017.[4][5][6]

A spin-off series, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland, consisting of 13 episodes, premiered on October 10, 2013, and concluded on April 3, 2014. It followed the journey of Alice, from Alice in Wonderland. [7]

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Series overview[edit]

For the first six seasons, the series originally took place in the fictional seaside town of Storybrooke, Maine, in which the residents are actually characters from various fairy tales and other stories that were transported to the real world town and robbed of their original memories by the Evil Queen Regina (Lana Parrilla) who used a powerful curse obtained from Rumplestiltskin (Robert Carlyle). The residents of Storybrooke, where Regina is mayor, have lived an unchanging existence for 28 years, unaware of their own lack of aging. The town’s only hope lies with a bail-bonds person named Emma Swan (Jennifer Morrison), the daughter of Snow White (Ginnifer Goodwin) and Prince Charming (Josh Dallas), who was transported from the Enchanted Forest to the real world via a magic tree as an infant before she could be cursed. As such, she is the only person who can break the curse and restore the characters’ lost memories. She is aided by her son, Henry (Jared S. Gilmore), with whom she was recently reunited after giving him up for adoption upon his birth, and his Once Upon a Time book of fairy tales that holds the key to breaking the curse. Henry is also the adopted son of Regina, providing a source of both conflict and common interest between the two women.

In the seventh season reboot, an adult Henry Mills (Andrew J. West), along with Regina, Captain Hook (Colin O’Donoghue) and Rumplestiltskin, are found years later in the Seattle neighborhood of Hyperion Heights, where characters from a different realm were brought under a new curse. Hoping to restore her family’s memories, Lucy (Alison Fernandez) must convince her parents, Henry and Cinderella (Dania Ramirez), of the true nature of Hyperion Heights, in the midst of emerging dangers involving Lady Tremaine(Gabrielle Anwar) and Mother Gothel (Emma Booth).

Episodes usually have one segment that details the characters’ past lives that, when serialized, adds a piece to the puzzle about the characters and their connection to the events that preceded the curse and its consequences. The other, set in the present day, follows a similar pattern with a different outcome but also offers similar insights.

Season 1 (2011–12)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 1)

The first season premiered on October 23, 2011. The Evil Queen interrupts the wedding of Snow White and Prince Charming to announce that she will cast a curse on everyone that will leave her with the only happy ending. The majority of the characters are transported to the town of Storybrooke, Maine, where they have been stripped of their original memories and identities as fairy tale characters. On her 28th birthday, Emma Swan, the daughter of Snow White and Prince Charming, is brought to Storybrooke by her biological son Henry Mills in the hopes of breaking the curse cast by his adoptive mother, the Evil Queen Regina.

Season 2 (2012–13)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 2)

The second season premiered on September 30, 2012.[8] Despite Emma having broken the curse, the characters are not returned to the fairy tale world, and must deal with their own dual identities. With the introduction of magic into Storybrooke by Mr. Gold, the fates of the two worlds become intertwined, and new threats emerge in the form of Captain Hook (Colin O’Donoghue), Regina’s mother Cora (Barbara Hershey), also known as the Queen of Hearts, and sinister operatives from the real world with an agenda to destroy magic.

Season 3 (2013–14)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 3)

The third season premiered on September 29, 2013. It was split into two volumes, with the first eleven episodes running from September to December 2013, and the later half from March to May 2014. In the first volume, the main characters travel to Neverland to rescue Henry, who has been kidnapped by Peter Pan (Robbie Kay) as part of a plan to obtain the “Heart of the Truest Believer” from him. Their increasing power struggle with Pan continues in Storybrooke, which ultimately results in the complete reversal of the original curse. All the characters are returned to their original worlds, leaving Emma and Henry to escape to New York City. In the second volume, the characters are mysteriously brought back to a recreated Storybrooke with their memories of the previous year removed, and the envious Wicked Witch of the West (Rebecca Mader) from the Land of Oz appears with a plan to change the past. Once again, Emma is needed to save her family.

Season 4 (2014–15)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 4)

The fourth season premiered on September 28, 2014. It was also split into two volumes, with the first eleven episodes running from September to December 2014, and the later half from March to May 2015. A new storyline incorporating elements from Frozen was revealed when the time travel events of the previous season lead to the accidental arrival of Elsa(Georgina Haig) from the Enchanted Forest of the past to present-day Storybrooke. As she searches for her sister Anna (Elizabeth Lail) with the aid of the main characters, they encounter the Snow Queen (Elizabeth Mitchell).[9] Meanwhile, Regina seeks the Author of Henry’s Once Upon a Time book so that she can finally have her happy ending. However, Mr. Gold, with the help of Cruella De Vil (Victoria Smurfit), Maleficent (Kristin Bauer van Straten), and Ursula (Merrin Dungey), has his own plan to rewrite the rules governing the fates of all heroes and villains. Henry and Emma race to restore reality and the truth before the twisted inversion becomes permanent. However, the price leads to the ultimate sacrifice.

Season 5 (2015–16)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 5)

The fifth season was announced on May 7, 2015,[10] and premiered on September 27, 2015. It was once again split into two volumes with the first volume ran from September to December 2015, and the second volume from March to May 2016. The characters embark on a quest to Camelot to find the Sorcerer Merlin (Elliot Knight) in order to free Emma from the powers of an ancient darkness that threatens to destroy everything. To complicate matters, King Arthur (Liam Garrigan) is determined to forever alter the balance between light and darkness using the legendary Excalibur. As history and destiny collide, unsuspected consequences lead the characters to the Underworld where they encounter souls of those with unfinished business and must face Hades (Greg Germann). In an attempt to restore order to the chaos that has culminated, the characters’ dangerous manipulations of magic lead to an exacerbation of the war between light and darkness, with the separation of Regina and her Evil Queen persona, as well as the arrival of Dr. Jekyll (Hank Harris) and Mr. Hyde (Sam Witwer).

Season 6 (2016–17)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 6)

The sixth season was announced on March 3, 2016, and premiered on September 25, 2016. The characters must defend Storybrooke from the combined threat of Mr. Hyde and an unleashed Evil Queen and the mysterious fate of saviors leads to Emma learning about Aladdin (Deniz Akdeniz).[11] The ongoing war between light and darkness ultimately leads to the arrival of the Black Fairy (Jaime Murray) as well as the final battle that was prophesied before the casting of the original curse.

Season 7 (2017)[edit]

See also: Once Upon a Time (season 7)

In May 2017, the series was renewed for a seventh season consisting of 22 episodes,[12] which marks the beginning of a soft reboot.[13][14][15] Years later, Lucy (Alison Fernandez) arrives in the neighborhood of Hyperion Heights in Seattle, Washington with her Once Upon a Time book to find her father Henry Mills (Andrew J. West) who is needed by his family.[16][17][18] Characters from the New Enchanted Forest[19] were brought to Hyperion Heights under a new curse and are caught in a rising conflict involving Cinderella (Dania Ramirez) and Lady Tremaine (Gabrielle Anwar) whose dangerous history with Mother Gothel (Emma Booth) is also revealed.

Episodes[edit]

See also: List of Once Upon a Time episodes

Season Episodes Originally aired Nielsen ratings
First aired Last aired Viewers
(millions)
Viewers
rank
18–49
rating/share
18-49
rank
1 22 October 23, 2011 May 13, 2012 11.71 28[20] 4.1/10 18[21]
2 22 September 30, 2012 May 12, 2013 10.24 35[22] 3.6/9 18[23]
3 22 September 29, 2013 May 11, 2014 9.38 35[24] 3.3/8 12[25]
4 22 September 28, 2014 May 10, 2015 8.98 50[26] 3.2/7 17[26]
5 23 September 27, 2015 May 15, 2016 6.32 69[27] 2.2/7 34[27]
6 22 September 25, 2016 May 14, 2017 4.39 105[28] 1.5/5 70[28]
7 22[29] October 6, 2017 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Once Upon a Time‘s first season received “generally favorable” reviews from critics. Metacritic gave it a score of 66 out of 100 based on 26 reviews. The pilot episode was watched by 12.93 million viewers and achieved an adult 18–49 rating/share of 4.0/10. The second season premiered on September 30, 2012, to an audience of 11.36 million viewers, while the third season began on September 29, 2013, opening to 8.52 million viewers. In May 2014, ABC renewed the show for its fourth season, premiering in September 2014 to an audience of 9.47 million viewers. The series was renewed for a fifth season in May 2015 and for a sixth season in March 2016.[30] On May 11, 2017, ABC renewed the series for a 22-episode seventh season.[31]

Cast[edit]

Main article: List of Once Upon a Time characters

Development and production[edit]

Conception[edit]

Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis conceived the show in 2004 before joining the writing staff of Lost, but wanted to wait until that series was over to focus on this project.[42]

The idea is to take these characters that we all know collectively and try to find things about them that we haven’t explored before. Sometimes it’s a story point, sometimes it’s a thematic connection, sometimes it’s a dilemma they face in both worlds that is similar. We are not generally retelling the exact same story as the fairy tale world.

— Executive producer Adam Horowitz[43]

Eight years before the Once Upon a Time pilot (the two had just completed their work on Felicity, in 2002), Kitsis and Horowitz became inspired to write fairy tales out of a love of “mystery and excitement of exploring lots of different worlds.”[44] They presented the premise to networks, but were refused because of its fantastic nature.[45] From their time on Lost, the writers learned to look at the story in a different way,[45] namely that “character has to trump mythology.”[43]

They explained,

“As people, you’ve got to see what the void in their heart or in their lives is to care about them … For us, this was as much about the character journeys and seeing what was ripped from them in coming to Storybrooke – going at it that way as opposed to making it the ‘break-the-curse show.'”[46]

Despite the comparisons and similarities to Lost, the writers intend them to be very different shows.[45] To them, Lost concerned itself with redemption, while Once Upon a Time is about “hope”.[47] Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof aids in the development of the series as a consultant, but has no official credit on the show. Kitsis and Horowitz have called him a “godfather” to the series.[48][49] To differentiate the storytelling from what the audience already knew, the writing staff decided to begin the pilot with the end of the typical Snow White fairytale.[46] Themes concerning family and motherhood were emphasized, in contrast to the focus on fatherhood in Lost. Kitsis and Horowitz sought to write strong female characters, rather than the classic damsel in distress. Horowitz stated their desire to approach each character the same way, asking themselves, “How do we make these icons real, make them relatable?”[45]

The pilot is meant to be the “template of the series”.[44] Kitsis confirmed that every week will contain flashbacks between both worlds,[43] as they “love the idea of going back and forth and informing what the character is missing in their life.”[50] The writers’ desire to present a “mash up” of many small characters can be seen in a scene of the pilot, in which there is a war council featuring Geppetto, Pinocchio, and Grumpy. Horowitz elaborated, “One of the fun things for us coming up with these stories is thinking of ways these different characters can interact in ways they never have before.”[45] Since then, the creators have added more elements, and given its ties to Disney, have managed to expand the universe to include more recent material, by throwing out hints that they might look ahead at incorporating characters from Brave and Frozen in future episodes, if they get the green light from Disney.[51] The Season 3 finale introduced Elsa in the final minutes of the episode.[52]

The general premise, importing the Snow White core characters into the “real world”, was previously seen on ABC television in the short-lived 1980s comedy The Charmings. The show also has a similar premise to Bill Willingham‘s ten-year-old comic series Fables, to which ABC bought the rights in 2008 but never made it past planning stages. After Fablesfans raised controversy over possible appropriation, the show writers initially denied a link, but later said they may have “read a couple issues” of the comic book but while the two concepts are “in the same playground”, they are “telling a different story.”[50] Bill Willingham responded to the controversy in an interview, where he stated he did not feel the show was plagiarism and said: “Maybe they did remember reading Fables back then, but didn’t want to mention it because we’ve become a very litigious people.”[50][53]

Casting[edit]

The cast as they appeared in season three.

Secondary character casting director, Samuel Forsyth, started the casting process in 2010. Horowitz stated that everyone they initially wanted for roles in the series accepted their roles after being sent a script.[44][45] Ginnifer Goodwin was cast as Snow White / Mary Margaret Blanchard,[54] who appreciated that she would be playing a strong character that was fleshed out for the audience. Goodwin had stated in interviews that she would love to play Snow White, and called her acceptance of the role “a no-brainer.”[55]Both Kitsis and Horowitz are self-described big fans of Goodwin’s previous series, Big Love, and wrote the part of Snow White with her in mind.[45] Josh Dallas, who portrays Prince Charming / David Nolan, was pleased the writers took “some dramatic license” with his character, believing the prince had become more real. He explained,

“Prince Charming just happens to be a name. He’s still a man with the same emotions as any other man. He’s a Prince, but he’s a Prince of the people. He gets his hands dirty. He’s got a kingdom to run. He has a family to protect. He has an epic, epic love for Snow White. He’s like everybody else. He’s human.”[55]

Jennifer Morrison was hired for the part of Emma Swan.[56] The actress explained her character as someone who “help[s] her son Henry whom she abandoned when he was a baby and who seems like he’s a little bit emotionally dysfunctional”, but noted that Emma does not start out believing in the fairytale universe.[55] Ten-year old Jared Gilmore, known for his work on Mad Men, took the role of her son, Henry.[56] The role of The Evil Queen/ Regina was given to Lana Parrilla.[57]

“There’s always two stories being told when playing Regina. There’s the threat of her knowing she’s an evil queen and then there’s just the pure simple fact that the biological mother has stepped into her world and the threat of losing her son is just enormous. That’s a fear that I think any adopted mother would have. I think that’s going to really help the audience relate to Regina in some level.”

Lana Parrilla[55]

The role of Rumplestiltskin / Mr. Gold was given to Robert Carlyle,[58] after having been written with him in mind, though the writers initially thought he would not accept the part.[43] Horowitz recalled Carlyle’s prison sequence, which was the actor’s first day on the set as “mind-blowing … You could see Ginny actually jump, the first time he did that character. It was fantastic!”[44]Jamie Dornan portrayed the Huntsman / Sheriff Graham[59] as a series regular before being killed off in the seventh episode,[60]while Eion Bailey was cast as Pinocchio / August Wayne Booth[59] in a recurring role,[61] starting in the show’s ninth episode, “True North”, where he was credited as “Stranger”, he was promoted to series regular status for the fifteenth episode, “Red-Handed”.[62] Raphael Sbarge portrayed Jiminy Cricket / Dr. Archie Hopper.[59]

For the second season, Meghan Ory and Emilie de Ravin were promoted to series regulars as Red Riding Hood / Ruby[63] and Belle / Lacey[64] respectively, while Bailey made guest appearances in two episodes after departing the series[65][66] and Sbarge joined the recurring cast.[67] Colin O’Donoghue was cast as Captain Killian “Hook” Jones,[68] and was upped to series regular for the fourteenth episode of the season.[69]

For the third season, Michael Raymond-James was promoted to a series regular as Neal Cassidy,[70] while Ory did not return as a series regular due to commitments to the TV series, Intelligence.[71]

For the fourth season, Michael Socha was brought onto the show as Will Scarlet / Knave of Hearts from the show’s spin-off, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland,[72][73] while Raymond-James was dropped from the regular cast[74] when the writers decided to kill off his character.[74] Bailey returned in a recurring arc towards the end of the season after being absent from the show since the second season.[75]

For the fifth season, Rebecca Mader[40] and Sean Maguire[40] were announced to have been promoted to series regulars as Zelena / Wicked Witch of the West and Robin Hoodrespectively, while Socha was confirmed to not be returning as a series regular.[76] Ory also returned to the series in a recurring capacity after being absent since the third-season finale.[39]

Before the series was renewed for a seventh season, Jennifer Morrison announced that, if the series were to be renewed, she would not be returning as a series regular for that season but agreed to return for one episode to wrap up Emma Swan’s storyline.[77] Later that week, actress Rebecca Mader announced that she would also be leaving the series after the sixth season wrapped. It was later announced that Ginnifer Goodwin, Josh Dallas, Jared S. Gilmore and Emilie de Ravin would also be leaving the show after the sixth season’s finale aired. Along with departures, Andrew J. West and Alison Fernandez were announced to be joining the seventh season of the show as series regulars after guest starring in the previous season’s finale. They will portray an older Henry Mills and his daughter Lucy respectively. In July 2017, actresses Dania Ramirez and Gabrielle Anwar were announced to be joining the cast of the seventh season as series regulars, playing new iterations of Cinderella and Lady Tremaine, respectively. In September 2017, Mekia Cox, who portrays Tiana, was promoted to a series regular.[78]

Filming[edit]

Steveston, BC doubles as the town of Storybrooke, Maine for the series’ six seasons.

Principal photography for the series takes place in Vancouver, British Columbia.[79][80] The village of Steveston in the adjacent city of Richmond doubles as Storybrooke for the series, with props and exterior sets disguising the existing businesses and buildings. During filming, all brightly-colored objects (flowers, etc.) are hidden to reinforce the story village’s spell-subdued character. Certain sets are additionally filmed in separate studios, including the interior of Mr. Gold’s pawn shop and the clock tower, which are not found in Steveston.[81]

Setting[edit]

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Main settings[edit]

During the first six seasons, the Enchanted Forest was one of the main setting of the series. The Enchanted Forest is a realm within Fairy Tale Land, but the actual spread and scope of the realm is not known. However, they were later united during the Ogre Wars, which played a part in the formation of the War Council that was formed by Prince Charming and served as the catalysts in the backstories involving Rumpelstiltskin and the Evil Queen. Several independent kingdoms are implied by an array of different rulers. Most of the stories detailed their earlier lives before ascension to power and being influenced by their mentors through their upbringings.

The Land Without Magic, commonly known as the Real World, is another main setting, shown as a place devoid with magic, and not connected to the others. It is often said that travelling to the Land Without Magic is hard, but possible, such as magical doors created by the Apprentice, magic beans, or the Dark Curse. During the first six seasons, Storybrooke, Maine was the main setting, serving as an isolated town separated from the rest of the world, where the cursed inhabitants are trapped by various forces. During the series’ seventh season, the setting shifted to Hyperion Heights, Seattle, where unlike Storybrooke, its cursed inhabitants are living among ordinary people.

During the seventh season, the New Enchanted Forest[82] is shown as the main setting, alongside with Hyperion Heights. As a world of its own, it is divided into several independent kingdoms with different rulers. Due to a conflict among its people and the royal family, a resistance is formed to rebel against them and Lady Tremaine. Most flashbacks shown are involving events happened before the original curse and before the latest curse that brought everyone to Hyperion Heights.

Expanded settings[edit]

The realms and worlds featured in the series are mostly based on many fairy tales, mythologies and real life locations and are magical, unlike the real world which is dubbed the Land Without Magic. Just like the Enchanted Forest, the other realms and worlds were affected by the Evil Queen’s curse, but indirectly, merely freezing them in time and state for twenty-eight years.

Some of the worlds within the universe are mostly based fairy tales where witchcraft plays a vital role in the lands. Known worlds are Fairy Tale Land,[83] Wonderland,[83]Neverland,[83] the Land of Oz,[83] the Alternate World,[84] the Land of Untold Stories,[83] the World Behind the Mirror,[85] the Dark Realm,[86] the Wish Realm,[86] the New Enchanted Forest,[87] the Edge of Realms,[88] and New Wonderland.[89]

There are also worlds known as the Realms of Storytelling.[90] These realms are mostly based on the Land Without Magic, taking the name of a certain location and a certain time period. Known worlds are the Land Without Color,[83] 19th Century London,[91] Victorian England,[92] Kansas,[93] 1920s England,[94] 19th Century France,[95] and the Land Without Stories.[96]

Additionally, several spiritual worlds exist in the universe. These worlds are known to not sustain living inhabitants, merely souls of the living in some and the deceased in others, with exception of the deities. Such worlds are the Dreamscape,[97] the Netherworld,[98] the Underworld,[99] the Worst Place,[100] and Mount Olympus.[101]

Cultural references[edit]

As a nod to the ties between the production teams of Once Upon a Time and Lost, the former show contains allusions to Lost, and is expected to continue alluding to Lost throughout its run.[50] For example, many items found in the Lost universe, such as Apollo candy barsOceanic AirlinesAjira Airways, the TV series Exposé and MacCutcheon Whiskey, can be seen in Once Upon a Time.[102]

Music[edit]

Mark Isham composed the series’ theme and music. On February 14, 2012, an extended play album featuring four cues from the score was released by ABC Studios.[103] On May 1, 2012, a full-length 25-track official soundtrack album was released by Intrada Records to accompany season one.[104] On August 13, 2013, another full-length 25-track official soundtrack album was released by Intrada to accompany season two.[105] Since December 2015, Mark Isham had begun to release music that was previously not released from the third, fourth and fifth seasons on his Soundcloud account.

[show]Season 1 Soundtrack

 

[show]Season 2 Soundtrack

Broadcast[edit]

The series has been licensed to over 190 countries.[106] In Australia, Once Upon a Time first aired on Seven Network, starting on May 15, 2012. In Canada it airs on CTV from October 23, 2011. It premiered on Channel 5 in the United Kingdom on April 1, 2012.[107] On December 17, 2013, it was confirmed that Channel 5 would not be picking the series up for the third season airing in the UK.[107] On March 14, 2015, Netflix picked up the show in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, subsequently showing all seasons and premiering each new episode on Wednesdays after their initial showing on Sundays on ABC.

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Critical response to the first season was generally positive. On Metacritic, it was given a score of 66 out of 100 with “generally favorable reviews”.[108] E!‘s Kristin dos Santos cited the show as one of the five new shows of the 2011–2012 season to watch.[109] Matthew Gilbert of The Boston Globe gave the show a “C+” grade commenting

“From a pair of Lost producers, this is a love-or-hate proposition. The ambition is impressive, as it asks us to imagine Goodwin’s Snow White and Parrilla’s Evil Queen as moderns. But Morrison is a wooden lead, and the back stories – a random collection of fairy tales — don’t promise to surprise.”[110]

In a review from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, TV critic Gail Pennington hailed it as one of the “Most Promising Shows of The Fall” and, unlike Gilbert, had high marks for Morrison.[111]USA Today‘s Robert Blanco placed the series on its top ten list, declaring that “There’s nothing else on the air quite like it.”[112] Mary McNamara of the Los Angeles Times preferred the series to another fairy-tale themed drama, Grimm, citing that the premise takes its time building up the charm and that the producer “has that part nailed”. She also gave excellent reviews for Morrison’s character: “Her Emma is predictably cynical and prickly – fairy-tale princess, my Aunt Fanny – but she’s sharp and lively enough to keep audiences begging for ‘just a few more pages’ before they go to bed.”[113]

Several feminist outlets were pleased with the show for its feminist twist on fairy tales. Avital Norman Nathman of Bitch stated that she liked the show for “infusing a feminist sensibility” into the stories.[114] Genie Leslie at Feministing commented that Emma was a “badass”, that she liked how Emma was “very adamant that women be able to make their own decisions about their lives and their children”, and how Emma was a “well-rounded” character who was “feminine, but not ‘girly'”.[115] Natalie Wilson from Ms. praised the show for a strong, “kick-butt” female lead, for including multiple strong women who take turns doing the saving with the men, for subverting the fetishization of true love, and for dealing with the idea of what makes a mother in a more nuanced fashion. Wilson went on to state of the lead: “Her pursuit of a ‘happy ending’ is not about finding a man or going to a ball all gussied up, but about detective work, about building a relationship with her son Henry, and about seeking the ‘truth’ as to why time stands still in the corrupt Storybrooke world.”[116]

Ratings[edit]

The first season premiered as the top-rated drama series. The pilot episode was watched by 13 million viewers and received a 4.0 rating/share among 18- to 49-year-olds.[117] It was the season’s highest-rated drama debut among the age range and ABC’s biggest debut in five years.[118][119] With DVR viewers, the premiere climbed to 15.5 million viewers and a 5.2 rating/share in adults 18–49.[120] The show’s next three episodes had consistent ratings every week with over 11 million viewers.[121][122][123] The series has become the number one non-sports program in the U.S. with viewers and young adults on Sunday nights.[124]

Season Timeslot (ET) Episodes First aired Last aired TV season Rank Avg. viewers
(millions)
18–49 rating
(average)
Date Viewers
(millions)
Date Viewers
(millions)
1 Sunday 8:00 pm 22 October 23, 2011 12.93[125] May 13, 2012 9.66[126] 2011–12 28 11.71[127] 4.1/10[128]
2 22 September 30, 2012 11.36[129] May 12, 2013 7.33[130] 2012–13 35 10.24[131] 3.6/9[132]
3 22 September 29, 2013 8.52[133] May 11, 2014 6.80[134] 2013–14 35 9.38[135] 3.3/8[136]
4 22 September 28, 2014 9.47[137] May 10, 2015 5.51[138] 2014–15 50 8.98[139] 3.2/7[139]
5 23 September 27, 2015 5.93[140] May 15, 2016 4.07[141] 2015–16 69 6.32[27] 2.2[27]
6 22 September 25, 2016 3.99[142] May 14, 2017 2.95[143] 2016–17 105 4.39[144] 1.5/5[28]
7 Friday 8:00 pm 22[145] October 6, 2017 3.26[146] TBA TBD 2017–18 TBD TBD TBD

Awards and nominations[edit]

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Once Upon a Time

Once Upon a Time was nominated for a 2012 People’s Choice Award for “Favorite New TV Drama”, but lost to Person of Interest.[147] The show was nominated at the 39th People’s Choice Awards in four categories: Favorite Network TV Drama, Favorite Sci-Fi/Fantasy Show, Favorite TV Fan Following, and Favorite TV Drama Actress (Ginnifer Goodwin); it lost to another ABC show Grey’s Anatomy in the first category, Supernatural in the second two, and Ellen Pompeo (from Grey’s Anatomy) in the last category. the show was nominated at 40th People’s Choice Awards, but lost to Beauty and the Beast and The Vampire Diaries, respectively.

The show was also nominated for “Best Genre Series” at the 2011 Satellite Awards, but lost to American Horror Story.[148] The show was nominated in this category again at the 2012 Satellite Awards, but lost to The Walking Dead.[149]

The program also received three nominations at the 2012 Visual Effects Society Awards, but all lost to Boardwalk EmpireGears of War 3, and Terra Nova.[150]

At the 38th Saturn Awards, the series received a nomination for Best Network Television Series and Parrilla was nominated for Best Supporting Actress on Television, but lost to Fringe and Michelle Forbes, respectively.[151]

The program was nominated for the former award again at the 39th Saturn Awards, but lost to new series Revolution.[152]

Jared S. Gilmore was nominated for Best Performance by an Younger Actor on Television at 40th Saturn Awards, but lost to Chandler Riggs for The Walking Dead

The show received trophies for “Favorite New TV Drama” and “Favorite Villain” for Lana Parrilla by the TV Guide.[153]

The show was nominated at the 2012 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire DiariesPretty Little Liars and Awkward and the show was also nominated at 2013 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire Diaries and Pretty Little Liars.

The show was nominated again 2014 Teen Choice Awards, but lost to The Vampire Diaries and Dylan O’Brien, respectively.

It was also nominated at the 64th Creative Arts Primetime Emmy Awards, but lost to Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead and the show was nominated again at 65th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards, but lost to The Borgias and Game of Thrones.

Tie-in material[edit]

Novels[edit]

In 2013, Disney-owned Hyperion Books published Reawakened by Odette Beane, a novelization of storylines from the first season, expanded to include new perspectives. The narrative is from the points-of-view of Emma Swan in Storybrooke and Snow White in the Enchanted Forest. The novel was published on April 28, 2013, as an ebook and May 7, 2013, in paperback form.[154]

In 2015, production company Kingswell Teen published Red’s Untold Tale, by Wendy Toliver, a novel telling a story of Red’s past that was not seen in the show. The novel was published on September 22, 2015 and consisted of 416 pages.

In 2017, Kingswell Teen published a second novel, Regina Rising, also written by Wendy Toliver, which depicts the life of a sixteen year old Regina. The novel was published on April 25, 2017.

Comic books[edit]

 

The Vault

 

The Vault (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vault
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dan Bush
Produced by Tom Butterfield
Alex Cutler
Luke Daniels
Alan Pao
Written by Dan Bush
Conal Byrne
Starring ·         Francesca Eastwood

·         Taryn Manning

·         Scott Haze

·         Q’orianka Kilcher

·         Clifton Collins Jr.

·         James Franco

Music by Shaun Drew
Cinematography Andrew Shulkind
Edited by Dan Bush
Ed Marx
Production
company
Redwire Pictures
Content Media
Culmination Productions
Casadelic Pictures
Jeff Rice Films
LB Entertainment
Imprint Entertainment
Psychopia Pictures
Distributed by FilmRise
Release date ·         September 1, 2017
Running time 91 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Box office $5,728[2]

The Vault is a 2017 American thriller film directed by Dan Bush and written by Dan Bush and Conal Byrne. The film stars Francesca EastwoodTaryn ManningScott HazeQ’orianka KilcherClifton Collins Jr. and James Franco. The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

After starting a fire in a nearby warehouse as a diversion, five robbers — Leah; her sister, Vee; their brother, Michael; Kramer, the safecracker; and Cyrus, the muscle — initiate a bank robbery. An officer inside the bank tries to call for help on his police radio. Detective Iger, who had just been in the bank hears the call, and decides to check it out. While walking back to check on the bank he hears another, anonymous call on his radio about the robbery.

The robbers find only $70,000 in the vault. Leah wants to leave but Vee and Cyrus demand more money. The assistant manager (James Franco) says he will tell them where $6 million is stored, as long as they don’t hurt anyone. He tells them the money is in the basement vault which is a part of the old bank and hands them the key to the access door.

By now police are stationed outside the bank, and Leah is confused as to how they knew about the heist. The head teller, Susan, tries to connect with Michael, telling him he is a decent man. He tells her that he owes people a lot of money and his sisters are helping him rob the bank.

When Kramer successfully breaks open the vault, the lights flicker. A man in a white mask and what appears to be a group of the hostages attack him. He is then pulled inside the old vault. Leah and Vee watch from the security monitors upstairs, but only Kramer appears on the screen. Thinking there are more people in the bank, Leah ask Cyrus to count the hostages that are gathered inside the safety deposit vault. The lights start to flicker again and the vault door closes with Cyrus and the hostages inside. As Kramer is repeatedly stabbed in the basement vault, Cyrus is overcome by the same group of hostages that attacked Kramer. The man in the white mask appears and grabs his gun, forcing it into Cyrus’s mouth. When the vault door opens again, Leah goes in but Cyrus is nowhere in sight. Michael sees Kramer commit suicide.

Suspecting that Susan called the police, Leah interrogates her. Susan tells Leah about the robbery in 1982 where a robber in a white mask apparently “snapped” under the pressure and killed some hostages, forced some to kill each other and then burned the rest alive in the old vault. The masked man was never caught or found. Vee turns up with a bag of money — but the bills are all from 1982.

After the police attempt to take her and Vee out with sniper fire, an outgoing call indicator on an office telephone catches Leah’s attention. She picks it up and listens to the same robbery message that Detective Iger had heard earlier. Michael cuts into a water pipe to make an escape route and encounters a burned woman pleading for help. Vee finds Cyrus’s body with his head blown off. Leah heads outside and releases one of the hostages. She asks the Detective who made the phone call to the police. He answers that the message came from the radio, they never received any phone calls. Leah goes back inside to the telephone and listens to the same message being repeated, suddenly recognising the voice.

Vee escapes through the water pipe. As Michael begins setting the place on fire to cover their escape, Leah lets the hostages go. As she attempts to escape through the water pipe, the masked man and undead hostages attack her. Michael distracts them long enough to allow Leah to escape, then sets the place on fire, sacrificing himself.

During the ensuing police interview of the hostages, Detective Iger tries to find out why they know nothing about the bank employee who helped the robbers. Susan says she knows all the employees inside the bank for ten years and had never seen the man claiming him before. Susan looks at the investigation wall and points to a picture of the assistant manager. Detective Iger tells her the picture is of someone who died in the 1982 incident. He was the assistant manager who had called the police to report the robbery but was shot by the robber. It was the same call that Leah and Detective Iger had heard the previous day.

Leah and Vee meet in a rural area. The police assume all of the robbers died in the fire, so they are free to start their lives anew. When their car won’t start, Vee checks on the engine and is attacked by the man in the white mask.

Cast[edit]

  • Francesca Eastwoodas Leah Dillon
  • Taryn Manningas Vee Dillon
  • Scott Hazeas Michael Dillon
  • Q’orianka Kilcheras Susan Cromwell
  • Clifton Collins Jr.as Detective Iger
  • James Francoas The Assistant Manager/Ed Maas
  • Keith Lonekeras Cyrus
  • Jeff Gum as James Aiken
  • Jill Jane Clements as Mary
  • Michael Milford as Kramer
  • Aleksander Vayshelboym as Ben
  • Debbie Sherman as Lauren
  • Lee Broda as Nancy
  • Anthony DiRocco as Mark Fishman
  • Dmitry Paniotto as Max
  • Adina Galupa as Rebecca
  • Beatrice Hernandez as Pamela
  • Cristin Azure as Baghead Samantha
  • Rebecca Ray as Samantha
  • John D. Hickman as Marty
  • Robin Martino as Baghead Rebecca
  • Keenan Rogers as Baghead Thomas

Release[edit]

On November 5, 2016, FilmRise acquired distribution rights to the film.[3] The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.[4]

Reception[edit]

Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a rating of 14% based on reviews from 14 critics.[5] The film received an aggregate score of 60 out of 100 on Metacritic.[6]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^“The Vault Reviews”

. Metacritic. Retrieved 2017-09-02.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Box Office Mojo. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^Dave McNary (2016-11-05). “AFM: James Franco’s Heist Thriller ‘The Vault’ Sells to FilmRise”

. Variety. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^Clark Collis (2017-07-24). “James Franco stars in terrifying trailer for The Vault”

. Ew.com. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^http://www.metacritic.com/movie/the-vault

External links[edit]

on IMDb

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lice Through the Looking Glass (2016 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alice Through the Looking Glass
Theatrical release poster
Directed by James Bobin
Produced by ·         Joe Roth

·         Suzanne Todd

·         Jennifer Todd

·         Tim Burton

Written by Linda Woolverton
Based on Characters
by Lewis Carroll
Starring ·         Johnny Depp

·         Anne Hathaway

·         Mia Wasikowska

·         Matt Lucas

·         Rhys Ifans

·         Helena Bonham Carter

·         Sacha Baron Cohen

Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Stuart Dryburgh
Edited by Andrew Weisblum
Production
company
·         Walt Disney Pictures

·         Roth Films

·         Team Todd

·         Tim Burton Productions

Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release date ·         May 10, 2016 (London)

·         May 27, 2016 (United States)

Running time 113 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $170 million[2]
Box office $299.5 million[1]

Alice Through the Looking Glass is a 2016 American fantasy adventure film directed by James Bobin, written by Linda Woolvertonand produced by Tim BurtonJoe RothSuzanne Todd, and Jennifer Todd. It is based on the characters created by Lewis Carroll and is the sequel to the 2010 film Alice in Wonderland. The film stars Johnny DeppAnne HathawayMia WasikowskaMatt LucasRhys IfansHelena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen and features the voices of Stephen FryMichael SheenTimothy Spall, and Alan Rickman, in his final film role.

In the film, Alice comes across a magical looking glass that takes her back to Wonderland, where she finds that the Mad Hatter is acting madder than usual and wants to discover the truth about his family. Alice then travels through time (with the “Chronosphere”), comes across friends and enemies at different points of their lives, and embarks on a race to save the Hatter before time runs out.

The film premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 27, 2016. Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $299.5 million on a budget of $170 million.

Contents

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Plot[edit]

Alice Kingsleigh has spent the past three years following in her father’s footsteps and sailing the high seas. Upon her return to Londonfrom China, Alice discovers that her ex-fiancé, Hamish Ascot, has married her look-alike and taken over her father’s company and plans to have her sell him her father’s ship, “the Wonder”, in exchange for her family home. Unable to make a choice, Alice runs away, and comes across her butterfly friend Absolem, who disappears through a mysterious mirror in one of the upstairs rooms, returning to Wonderland.

There, Alice is greeted by Mirana of Marmoreal the White QueenNivens McTwisp the White Rabbit, the TweedlesMallymkun the DormouseThackery Earwicket the March HareBayard, and the Cheshire Cat. They inform her that Tarrant Hightopp the Mad Hatteris in poor health because his family is missing following the Attack of the Jabberwocky. The attack occurred shortly after his father, Zanik, a hat retailer, seemed to reject Tarrant’s gift of a hat creation.

The White Queen persuades Alice to convince Time himself to save the Mad Hatter’s family in the past, believing her to be the only one who can save the Hatter. However, she cautions Alice about Time, and that if her past self sees her future self, everything will be history. As Alice sets out, she ends up in a dreary castle, where Time himself, a demigod that is part-human, part-clock, resides. As Alice tries to consult Time, she finds the Chronosphere, an object that powers all time in Wonderland and will allow her to travel to any time in the past.

Alice ignores Time’s warning that the past is unchangeable, and steals the Chronosphere, shortly after finding Iracebeth of Crims, the exiled Red Queen, in the care of Time. Alice accidentally flies to the day of Iracebeth’s coronation, where a younger Mad Hatter mocks the Red Queen when the royal crown doesn’t fit on her abnormally large head. This causes Iracebeth to melt down, and her father deems her emotionally unqualified to rule and passes the title of queen to her younger sister, the White Queen.

Alice learns of an event in Iracebeth’s and Mirana’s past that caused friction between the two and travels back in time again, hoping it will change Iracebeth’s ways and stop the Jabberwocky from killing the Hatter’s family. She learns that the hat that the Mad Hatter thought his father threw away was actually treasured by him. Meanwhile, at the White Queen and Red Queen’s castle, at the time they are children, Mirana steals a tart from her mother and eats it. When confronted by their mother, Mirana lies about eating the tart, and Iracebeth is accused, causing her to run out of the castle. Alice sees that Iracebeth is about to run into a clock, thinking that’s the event that deforms her head and personality. Alice prevents that collision but fails to change the past, as Iracebeth trips and slams her head into a stone wall instead.

A weakened Time then confronts Alice after relentless searching, and scolds her for putting all of time in danger. Out of panic, Alice runs into a nearby mirror back in the real world, where she wakes up in a mental hospital, diagnosed with female hysteria. As Dr. Addison Bennett, a psychiatric doctor, tries to inject her with a sedative, with her mother Helen’s encouragement and help, she escapes and returns to Wonderland via the mirror, where she travels to Horevendush Day, when the Hightopp family was killed. Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter’s family was captured by the Red Queen instead and never died. Returning to the present, however, Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter is on the brink of death.

Alice, close to tears, says that she believes him, and Tarrant transforms back to his normal self. The Wonderlandians go to the Red Queen’s new organic plant castle, where the Mad Hatter finds his family shrunk and trapped in an ant farm. However, the Red Queen apprehends them and steals the Chronosphere from Alice. Ignoring Time’s warning, she takes her sister back to the day she lied about the tart. By the time the Mad Hatter and Alice get there, the Red Queen and her younger self have seen each other. Time becomes a paradox, and Wonderland begins to freeze in rust. As a powerless Time’s pleas, Alice and the Mad Hatter, with the White Queen and now-frozen Red Queen, use the Chronosphere to race back to the present as the rust proceeds to spread all over the ocean of Time and the castle, where Alice places the Chronosphere in its original place in time.

With the Chronosphere stabilized, Wonderland, including those frozen, are reverted to normal. The Mad Hatter reunites with his family, and the White Queen and Red Queen make amends, while Time forgives Alice for the trouble she caused, but forbids her to return. Alice bids farewell to her friends and returns to the real world through another mirror. Alice finds her mother, Helen, about to sign over the Wonder to Hamish and reassures her that it’s only a ship. Helen decides to support her daughter regardless. Hamish seizes the Kingsleigh family home but not the ship. Alice and her mother set out to travel the world together with their own shipping company.

Cast[edit]

Voice cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Tall ships in Gloucester Docks for the filming of Alice Through the Looking Glass. August 2014

The film was announced via Variety in December 2012.[11] Bobin was first approached about the project while doing post-production work on Muppets Most Wanted,[12] Of being asked, Bobin has said that “I just couldn’t pass it up”, as he has a passion for the works of Lewis Carroll as well as history in general.[13] In July 2013, it was announced that Johnny Depp would return as the Hatter,[14] with Mia Wasikowska‘s return confirmed the following November.[15] In January 2014 Sacha Baron Cohen joined the cast to play Time.[16] In May 2014, Rhys Ifansjoined the cast to play Zanik Hightopp, the Mad Hatter’s father.[17] In developing the character of “Time”, Bobin sought to avoid creating a “straight-up bad guy”, noting that it would be “a bit dull”, and also that the role in that universe already existed in the form of The Red Queen.[12] Instead, Bobin sought to make Time a “Twit”, further explaining that “There’s no one better at playing the confident idiot trope than Sacha Baron Cohen”, and adding that “it was very much with Sacha in mind”.[12]

Principal photography began on August 4, 2014, at Shepperton Studios.[18] In August 2014, filming took place in Gloucester Docks, which included the use of at least four historic ships: Kathleen and MayIreneExcelsior, and the Earl of Pembroke, the last of which was renamed The Wonder for filming.[19][20][21][22][23] Principal photography ended on October 31, 2014.[24]

Soundtrack[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Film score by Danny Elfman
Released May 27, 2016
Recorded 2016
Studio Abbey Road Studios
Genre Orchestralpop rock
Length 76:53
Label Walt Disney
Producer Danny Elfman
Danny Elfman film scores chronology
Goosebumps
(2015)
Alice Through the Looking Glass
(2016)
Before I Wake
(2016)
Singles from Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
1.      “Just Like Fire
Released: April 15, 2016

2.      “Alice”
Released: May 27, 2016

3.      “Saving the Ship”
Released: May 27, 2016

4.      “Looking Glass”
Released: June 1, 2016

5.      “Truth”
Released: July 28, 2016

6.      “Story of Time”
Released: August 7, 2016

7.      “The Red Queen”
Released: October 18, 2016

8.      “The Chronosphere”
Released: October 20, 2016

The film’s score was composed by Danny Elfman. The soundtrack was released on May 27, 2016, by Walt Disney RecordsPinkrecorded the song “Just Like Fire” for the film, and also covered Jefferson Airplane‘s “White Rabbit“, only used in the film’s promotional material.

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Danny Elfman.

No. Title Length
1. “Alice” 6:35
2. “Saving the Ship” 3:40
3. “Watching Time” 5:10
4. “Looking Glass” 3:30
5. “To the Rescue” 0:56
6. “Hatter House” 3:47
7. “The Red Queen” 2:29
8. “The Chronosphere” 4:15
9. “Warning Hightopps” 2:23
10. “Tea Time Forever” 1:45
11. “Oceans of Time” 1:15
12. “Hat Heartbreak” 2:27
13. “Asylum Escape” 4:06
14. “Hatter’s Deathbed” 3:22
15. “Finding the Family” 2:04
16. “Time Is Up” 4:24
17. “World’s End” 1:50
18. “Truth” 4:09
19. “Goodbye Alice” 2:13
20. “Kingsleigh & Kingsleigh” 1:19
21. “Seconds Song” 0:11
22. “Friends United” 1:06
23. “Time’s Castle” 1:49
24. “The Seconds” 1:55
25. “Clock Shop” 0:50
26. “They’re Alive” 2:23
27. “Story of Time” 3:03
28. Just Like Fire” (performed by Pink) 3:35
Total length: 76:53

Release[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released on May 27, 2016, in the United States by Walt Disney Pictures.

Home media[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass was released on Blu-ray, DVD and digital download on October 18, 2016, by Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment.[25][26] It debuted at No. 2 in the Blu-ray Disc sales charts.[27]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $77 million in the United States and Canada and $222.4 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $299.5 million, against a budget of $170 million.[1]

North America[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass opened in the United States and Canada on May 27, 2016, alongside X-Men: Apocalypse, and was initially projected to gross $55–60 million from 3,763 theaters over its four-day Memorial Day opening weekend, but projections were continuously revised downwards due to poor word of mouth.[28] It had the added benefit of playing in over 3,100 3D theaters, 380 IMAX screens, 77 premium large formats and 79 D-box locations.[29][30] It made $1.5 million from Thursday previews (to the first film’s $3.9 million)[31] and just $9.7 million on its first day, compared to the $41 million opening Friday of its predecessor.[32] Through its opening weekend, it earned $27 million, which when compared to its predecessor’s $116 million opening is down 70%.[28] While 3D represented 71% ($82 million) of the original film’s opening gross, 3D constituted only 41% ($11 million) for this sequel, with 29% coming from traditional 3D shows, 11% from IMAX, and 1% from premium large formats.[33] It became the studio’s third Memorial Day opening flop following Tomorrowland in 2015 and Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time in 2010.[33] During its first week, the film grossed $40.1 million.[34] In its second weekend, the film grossed $11.3 million (a 55.1% drop), finishing 4th at the box office.[35]

Other countries[edit]

The film was released across 43 countries (72% of its total market place) the same weekend as the US, and was estimated to gross $80–100 million in its opening weekend. It faced competition from Warcraft and X-Men: Apocalypse.[36] It ended up grossing $62.7 million, which is well below the projections of which $4.1 million came from IMAX shows.[37] It had an opening weekend gross in Mexico ($4.5 million), Brazil ($4.1 million), and Russia ($3.9 million).[37] In the United Kingdom and Ireland, it had an unsuccessful opening by grossing just £2.23 million ($3.1 million) during its opening weekend, a mere 21% of the first film’s £10.56 million ($15.2 million) opening from 603 theaters. It debuted in second place behind X-Men: Apocalypse which was on its second weekend of play.[38] In China, it had an opening day of an estimated $7.3 million[39] and went on to score the second biggest Disney live-action (non-Marvel or Lucasfilm) opening ever with $26.6 million, behind only The Jungle Book.[37] However, this was down from its $35–45 million projections.[40] It debuted at the No. 1 spot among newly released film in Japan with $5.2 million and $4.1 million on Saturday and Sunday. By comparison, the first film opened with $14 million on its way to a $133.6 million a total.[41][42]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 29% based on 234 reviews, and an average rating of 4.6/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Alice Through the Looking Glass is just as visually impressive as its predecessor, but that isn’t enough to cover for an underwhelming story that fails to live up to its classic characters.”[43] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 34 out of 100 based on 42 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[44] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “A–” on an A+ to F scale, the same grade earned by its predecessor.[45]

Stephen Holden of The New York Times wrote in his review, “What does all this have to do with Lewis Carroll? Hardly anything” and that overall, “It’s just an excuse on which to hang two trite overbearing fables and one amusing one”.[46] Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the movie 1.5 out of 4 stars and called the film, “gaudy, loud, complacent, and vulgar.”[47]Stephen Whitty of New York Daily News called the film “hugely expensive and extravagantly stupid” and that, overall, the movie “is just one more silly Hollywood mashup, an innocent fantasy morphed into a noisy would-be blockbuster”.[48]

Matt Zoller Seitz of RogerEbert.com was deeply critical of Through the Looking Glass, describing it as “the most offensive kind of film…one that spends an enormous amount of money yet seems to have nothing on its mind but money. You give it, they take it. And you get nothing in return but assurances that you’re seeing magic and wonder. The movie keeps repeating it in your ear, and flashing it onscreen in big block letters: MAGIC AND WONDER. MAGIC AND WONDER. But there is no magic, no wonder, just junk rehashed from a movie that was itself a rehash of Lewis Carroll, tricked out with physically unpersuasive characters and landscapes and ‘action scenes’, with blockbuster ‘journey movie’ tropes affixed to every set-piece as blatantly as Post-It Notes.”[49]

Kyle Smith of New York Post gave the film a positive review: “The screenplay (by Linda Woolverton) isn’t exactly heaving with brilliant ideas, but it works well enough as a blank canvas against which the special-effects team goes bonkers”.[50] Matthew Lickona of San Diego Reader said that while he found the visual effects to be “stupidly expensive” and the story familiar, he called it, “a solid kids’ movie in the old style”.[51]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Category Recipient(s) Result Ref(s)
Golden Raspberry Awards Worst Prequel, Remake, Rip-off or Sequel Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [52]
Worst Supporting Actor Johnny Depp
Worst Screen Combo Johnny Depp and His Vomitously Vibrant Costume
Golden Trailer Awards Best Animation Family “Poem” [53]
The Don LaFontaine Award for Best Voice Over “Poem”
Best Fantasy Adventure TV Spot “Grammys”
Best Original Score TV Spot “Grammys”
Grammy Awards Best Song Written For Visual Media Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max MartinPink and Shellback [54]
Hollywood Music in Media Awards Best Song – Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film “Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max Martin, Pink and Shellback Won [55][56]
People’s Choice Awards Favorite Family Movie Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [57]
Satellite Awards Best Art Direction and Production Design Dan Hennah [58]
Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood
Saturn Awards Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood [59]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Music: Song from a Movie or TV Show “Just Like Fire” by Pink [60]
Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

A comic book, titled Once Upon a Time: Shadow of the Queen, was released on September 4, 2013, in both digital and hardcover forms. The story was written by Dan Thomsen and Corinna Bechko, with art by Nimit Malavia, Vasilis Lolos, Mike Del Mundo, Stephanie Hans and Mike Henderson. Shadow of the Queen details what happens after the Evil Queen takes the Huntsman’s heart. She forces the Huntsman to commit evil, and try to capture Snow White yet again. The Huntsman faces his past, and also meets Red Riding Hood, who is trying to cope with her beastly alter ego. Together, they team up and try to save Snow White before all is too late.[155]

On April 14, 2014, a sequel to the first comic book called Once Upon a Time: Out of the Past was released.[156]

Spin-off[edit]

Main article: Once Upon a Time in Wonderland

In February 2013, Kitsis & Horowitz, along with producers Zack Estrin and Jane Espenson, developed a spin-off focusing on Lewis Carroll‘s Wonderland.[157] The series was called Once Upon a Time in Wonderland. A “teaser presentation” began shooting in April 2013, and the pilot was shot in late July or August.[158] On May 10, 2013, ABC announced that it had approved the spin-off and on May 14, 2013, announced that the spin-off would air in the Thursday night 8:00pm time slot instead of making it a fill-in for the parent series.[159]The series premiered on October 10, 2013, but was cancelled[160] after a single-season thirteen-episode run that ended on April 3, 2014.[161]

 

Earth Taken

 

The human race is thrown into chaos as an alien invasion takes control of the planet in an effort to find one boy out of 7 billion people who holds the power to destroy them.

Director:

Grant Humphreys

Writers:

Michael HarrisonGrant Humphreys | 1 more credit »

Stars:

Ronan QuarmbyBrad RichardsBarbara Harrison

 

 

The Vault

 

The Vault (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vault
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dan Bush
Produced by Tom Butterfield
Alex Cutler
Luke Daniels
Alan Pao
Written by Dan Bush
Conal Byrne
Starring ·         Francesca Eastwood

·         Taryn Manning

·         Scott Haze

·         Q’orianka Kilcher

·         Clifton Collins Jr.

·         James Franco

Music by Shaun Drew
Cinematography Andrew Shulkind
Edited by Dan Bush
Ed Marx
Production
company
Redwire Pictures
Content Media
Culmination Productions
Casadelic Pictures
Jeff Rice Films
LB Entertainment
Imprint Entertainment
Psychopia Pictures
Distributed by FilmRise
Release date ·         September 1, 2017
Running time 91 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Box office $5,728[2]

The Vault is a 2017 American thriller film directed by Dan Bush and written by Dan Bush and Conal Byrne. The film stars Francesca EastwoodTaryn ManningScott HazeQ’orianka KilcherClifton Collins Jr. and James Franco. The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

After starting a fire in a nearby warehouse as a diversion, five robbers — Leah; her sister, Vee; their brother, Michael; Kramer, the safecracker; and Cyrus, the muscle — initiate a bank robbery. An officer inside the bank tries to call for help on his police radio. Detective Iger, who had just been in the bank hears the call, and decides to check it out. While walking back to check on the bank he hears another, anonymous call on his radio about the robbery.

The robbers find only $70,000 in the vault. Leah wants to leave but Vee and Cyrus demand more money. The assistant manager (James Franco) says he will tell them where $6 million is stored, as long as they don’t hurt anyone. He tells them the money is in the basement vault which is a part of the old bank and hands them the key to the access door.

By now police are stationed outside the bank, and Leah is confused as to how they knew about the heist. The head teller, Susan, tries to connect with Michael, telling him he is a decent man. He tells her that he owes people a lot of money and his sisters are helping him rob the bank.

When Kramer successfully breaks open the vault, the lights flicker. A man in a white mask and what appears to be a group of the hostages attack him. He is then pulled inside the old vault. Leah and Vee watch from the security monitors upstairs, but only Kramer appears on the screen. Thinking there are more people in the bank, Leah ask Cyrus to count the hostages that are gathered inside the safety deposit vault. The lights start to flicker again and the vault door closes with Cyrus and the hostages inside. As Kramer is repeatedly stabbed in the basement vault, Cyrus is overcome by the same group of hostages that attacked Kramer. The man in the white mask appears and grabs his gun, forcing it into Cyrus’s mouth. When the vault door opens again, Leah goes in but Cyrus is nowhere in sight. Michael sees Kramer commit suicide.

Suspecting that Susan called the police, Leah interrogates her. Susan tells Leah about the robbery in 1982 where a robber in a white mask apparently “snapped” under the pressure and killed some hostages, forced some to kill each other and then burned the rest alive in the old vault. The masked man was never caught or found. Vee turns up with a bag of money — but the bills are all from 1982.

After the police attempt to take her and Vee out with sniper fire, an outgoing call indicator on an office telephone catches Leah’s attention. She picks it up and listens to the same robbery message that Detective Iger had heard earlier. Michael cuts into a water pipe to make an escape route and encounters a burned woman pleading for help. Vee finds Cyrus’s body with his head blown off. Leah heads outside and releases one of the hostages. She asks the Detective who made the phone call to the police. He answers that the message came from the radio, they never received any phone calls. Leah goes back inside to the telephone and listens to the same message being repeated, suddenly recognising the voice.

Vee escapes through the water pipe. As Michael begins setting the place on fire to cover their escape, Leah lets the hostages go. As she attempts to escape through the water pipe, the masked man and undead hostages attack her. Michael distracts them long enough to allow Leah to escape, then sets the place on fire, sacrificing himself.

During the ensuing police interview of the hostages, Detective Iger tries to find out why they know nothing about the bank employee who helped the robbers. Susan says she knows all the employees inside the bank for ten years and had never seen the man claiming him before. Susan looks at the investigation wall and points to a picture of the assistant manager. Detective Iger tells her the picture is of someone who died in the 1982 incident. He was the assistant manager who had called the police to report the robbery but was shot by the robber. It was the same call that Leah and Detective Iger had heard the previous day.

Leah and Vee meet in a rural area. The police assume all of the robbers died in the fire, so they are free to start their lives anew. When their car won’t start, Vee checks on the engine and is attacked by the man in the white mask.

Cast[edit]

  • Francesca Eastwoodas Leah Dillon
  • Taryn Manningas Vee Dillon
  • Scott Hazeas Michael Dillon
  • Q’orianka Kilcheras Susan Cromwell
  • Clifton Collins Jr.as Detective Iger
  • James Francoas The Assistant Manager/Ed Maas
  • Keith Lonekeras Cyrus
  • Jeff Gum as James Aiken
  • Jill Jane Clements as Mary
  • Michael Milford as Kramer
  • Aleksander Vayshelboym as Ben
  • Debbie Sherman as Lauren
  • Lee Broda as Nancy
  • Anthony DiRocco as Mark Fishman
  • Dmitry Paniotto as Max
  • Adina Galupa as Rebecca
  • Beatrice Hernandez as Pamela
  • Cristin Azure as Baghead Samantha
  • Rebecca Ray as Samantha
  • John D. Hickman as Marty
  • Robin Martino as Baghead Rebecca
  • Keenan Rogers as Baghead Thomas

Release[edit]

On November 5, 2016, FilmRise acquired distribution rights to the film.[3] The film was released on September 1, 2017, by FilmRise.[4]

Reception[edit]

Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a rating of 14% based on reviews from 14 critics.[5] The film received an aggregate score of 60 out of 100 on Metacritic.[6]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^“The Vault Reviews”

. Metacritic. Retrieved 2017-09-02.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Box Office Mojo. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^Dave McNary (2016-11-05). “AFM: James Franco’s Heist Thriller ‘The Vault’ Sells to FilmRise”

. Variety. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^Clark Collis (2017-07-24). “James Franco stars in terrifying trailer for The Vault”

. Ew.com. Retrieved 2017-08-15.

  1. Jump up^“The Vault (2017)”

. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2017-09-12.

  1. Jump up^http://www.metacritic.com/movie/the-vault

External links[edit]

on IMDb

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lice Through the Looking Glass (2016 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alice Through the Looking Glass
Theatrical release poster
Directed by James Bobin
Produced by ·         Joe Roth

·         Suzanne Todd

·         Jennifer Todd

·         Tim Burton

Written by Linda Woolverton
Based on Characters
by Lewis Carroll
Starring ·         Johnny Depp

·         Anne Hathaway

·         Mia Wasikowska

·         Matt Lucas

·         Rhys Ifans

·         Helena Bonham Carter

·         Sacha Baron Cohen

Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Stuart Dryburgh
Edited by Andrew Weisblum
Production
company
·         Walt Disney Pictures

·         Roth Films

·         Team Todd

·         Tim Burton Productions

Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release date ·         May 10, 2016 (London)

·         May 27, 2016 (United States)

Running time 113 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $170 million[2]
Box office $299.5 million[1]

Alice Through the Looking Glass is a 2016 American fantasy adventure film directed by James Bobin, written by Linda Woolvertonand produced by Tim BurtonJoe RothSuzanne Todd, and Jennifer Todd. It is based on the characters created by Lewis Carroll and is the sequel to the 2010 film Alice in Wonderland. The film stars Johnny DeppAnne HathawayMia WasikowskaMatt LucasRhys IfansHelena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen and features the voices of Stephen FryMichael SheenTimothy Spall, and Alan Rickman, in his final film role.

In the film, Alice comes across a magical looking glass that takes her back to Wonderland, where she finds that the Mad Hatter is acting madder than usual and wants to discover the truth about his family. Alice then travels through time (with the “Chronosphere”), comes across friends and enemies at different points of their lives, and embarks on a race to save the Hatter before time runs out.

The film premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 27, 2016. Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $299.5 million on a budget of $170 million.

Contents

[hide]

Plot[edit]

Alice Kingsleigh has spent the past three years following in her father’s footsteps and sailing the high seas. Upon her return to Londonfrom China, Alice discovers that her ex-fiancé, Hamish Ascot, has married her look-alike and taken over her father’s company and plans to have her sell him her father’s ship, “the Wonder”, in exchange for her family home. Unable to make a choice, Alice runs away, and comes across her butterfly friend Absolem, who disappears through a mysterious mirror in one of the upstairs rooms, returning to Wonderland.

There, Alice is greeted by Mirana of Marmoreal the White QueenNivens McTwisp the White Rabbit, the TweedlesMallymkun the DormouseThackery Earwicket the March HareBayard, and the Cheshire Cat. They inform her that Tarrant Hightopp the Mad Hatteris in poor health because his family is missing following the Attack of the Jabberwocky. The attack occurred shortly after his father, Zanik, a hat retailer, seemed to reject Tarrant’s gift of a hat creation.

The White Queen persuades Alice to convince Time himself to save the Mad Hatter’s family in the past, believing her to be the only one who can save the Hatter. However, she cautions Alice about Time, and that if her past self sees her future self, everything will be history. As Alice sets out, she ends up in a dreary castle, where Time himself, a demigod that is part-human, part-clock, resides. As Alice tries to consult Time, she finds the Chronosphere, an object that powers all time in Wonderland and will allow her to travel to any time in the past.

Alice ignores Time’s warning that the past is unchangeable, and steals the Chronosphere, shortly after finding Iracebeth of Crims, the exiled Red Queen, in the care of Time. Alice accidentally flies to the day of Iracebeth’s coronation, where a younger Mad Hatter mocks the Red Queen when the royal crown doesn’t fit on her abnormally large head. This causes Iracebeth to melt down, and her father deems her emotionally unqualified to rule and passes the title of queen to her younger sister, the White Queen.

Alice learns of an event in Iracebeth’s and Mirana’s past that caused friction between the two and travels back in time again, hoping it will change Iracebeth’s ways and stop the Jabberwocky from killing the Hatter’s family. She learns that the hat that the Mad Hatter thought his father threw away was actually treasured by him. Meanwhile, at the White Queen and Red Queen’s castle, at the time they are children, Mirana steals a tart from her mother and eats it. When confronted by their mother, Mirana lies about eating the tart, and Iracebeth is accused, causing her to run out of the castle. Alice sees that Iracebeth is about to run into a clock, thinking that’s the event that deforms her head and personality. Alice prevents that collision but fails to change the past, as Iracebeth trips and slams her head into a stone wall instead.

A weakened Time then confronts Alice after relentless searching, and scolds her for putting all of time in danger. Out of panic, Alice runs into a nearby mirror back in the real world, where she wakes up in a mental hospital, diagnosed with female hysteria. As Dr. Addison Bennett, a psychiatric doctor, tries to inject her with a sedative, with her mother Helen’s encouragement and help, she escapes and returns to Wonderland via the mirror, where she travels to Horevendush Day, when the Hightopp family was killed. Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter’s family was captured by the Red Queen instead and never died. Returning to the present, however, Alice discovers that the Mad Hatter is on the brink of death.

Alice, close to tears, says that she believes him, and Tarrant transforms back to his normal self. The Wonderlandians go to the Red Queen’s new organic plant castle, where the Mad Hatter finds his family shrunk and trapped in an ant farm. However, the Red Queen apprehends them and steals the Chronosphere from Alice. Ignoring Time’s warning, she takes her sister back to the day she lied about the tart. By the time the Mad Hatter and Alice get there, the Red Queen and her younger self have seen each other. Time becomes a paradox, and Wonderland begins to freeze in rust. As a powerless Time’s pleas, Alice and the Mad Hatter, with the White Queen and now-frozen Red Queen, use the Chronosphere to race back to the present as the rust proceeds to spread all over the ocean of Time and the castle, where Alice places the Chronosphere in its original place in time.

With the Chronosphere stabilized, Wonderland, including those frozen, are reverted to normal. The Mad Hatter reunites with his family, and the White Queen and Red Queen make amends, while Time forgives Alice for the trouble she caused, but forbids her to return. Alice bids farewell to her friends and returns to the real world through another mirror. Alice finds her mother, Helen, about to sign over the Wonder to Hamish and reassures her that it’s only a ship. Helen decides to support her daughter regardless. Hamish seizes the Kingsleigh family home but not the ship. Alice and her mother set out to travel the world together with their own shipping company.

Cast[edit]

Voice cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Tall ships in Gloucester Docks for the filming of Alice Through the Looking Glass. August 2014

The film was announced via Variety in December 2012.[11] Bobin was first approached about the project while doing post-production work on Muppets Most Wanted,[12] Of being asked, Bobin has said that “I just couldn’t pass it up”, as he has a passion for the works of Lewis Carroll as well as history in general.[13] In July 2013, it was announced that Johnny Depp would return as the Hatter,[14] with Mia Wasikowska‘s return confirmed the following November.[15] In January 2014 Sacha Baron Cohen joined the cast to play Time.[16] In May 2014, Rhys Ifansjoined the cast to play Zanik Hightopp, the Mad Hatter’s father.[17] In developing the character of “Time”, Bobin sought to avoid creating a “straight-up bad guy”, noting that it would be “a bit dull”, and also that the role in that universe already existed in the form of The Red Queen.[12] Instead, Bobin sought to make Time a “Twit”, further explaining that “There’s no one better at playing the confident idiot trope than Sacha Baron Cohen”, and adding that “it was very much with Sacha in mind”.[12]

Principal photography began on August 4, 2014, at Shepperton Studios.[18] In August 2014, filming took place in Gloucester Docks, which included the use of at least four historic ships: Kathleen and MayIreneExcelsior, and the Earl of Pembroke, the last of which was renamed The Wonder for filming.[19][20][21][22][23] Principal photography ended on October 31, 2014.[24]

Soundtrack[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Film score by Danny Elfman
Released May 27, 2016
Recorded 2016
Studio Abbey Road Studios
Genre Orchestralpop rock
Length 76:53
Label Walt Disney
Producer Danny Elfman
Danny Elfman film scores chronology
Goosebumps
(2015)
Alice Through the Looking Glass
(2016)
Before I Wake
(2016)
Singles from Alice Through the Looking Glass: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
9.      “Just Like Fire
Released: April 15, 2016

10.   “Alice”
Released: May 27, 2016

11.   “Saving the Ship”
Released: May 27, 2016

12.   “Looking Glass”
Released: June 1, 2016

13.   “Truth”
Released: July 28, 2016

14.   “Story of Time”
Released: August 7, 2016

15.   “The Red Queen”
Released: October 18, 2016

16.   “The Chronosphere”
Released: October 20, 2016

The film’s score was composed by Danny Elfman. The soundtrack was released on May 27, 2016, by Walt Disney RecordsPinkrecorded the song “Just Like Fire” for the film, and also covered Jefferson Airplane‘s “White Rabbit“, only used in the film’s promotional material.

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Danny Elfman.

No. Title Length
1. “Alice” 6:35
2. “Saving the Ship” 3:40
3. “Watching Time” 5:10
4. “Looking Glass” 3:30
5. “To the Rescue” 0:56
6. “Hatter House” 3:47
7. “The Red Queen” 2:29
8. “The Chronosphere” 4:15
9. “Warning Hightopps” 2:23
10. “Tea Time Forever” 1:45
11. “Oceans of Time” 1:15
12. “Hat Heartbreak” 2:27
13. “Asylum Escape” 4:06
14. “Hatter’s Deathbed” 3:22
15. “Finding the Family” 2:04
16. “Time Is Up” 4:24
17. “World’s End” 1:50
18. “Truth” 4:09
19. “Goodbye Alice” 2:13
20. “Kingsleigh & Kingsleigh” 1:19
21. “Seconds Song” 0:11
22. “Friends United” 1:06
23. “Time’s Castle” 1:49
24. “The Seconds” 1:55
25. “Clock Shop” 0:50
26. “They’re Alive” 2:23
27. “Story of Time” 3:03
28. Just Like Fire” (performed by Pink) 3:35
Total length: 76:53

Release[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass premiered in London on May 10, 2016, and was theatrically released on May 27, 2016, in the United States by Walt Disney Pictures.

Home media[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass was released on Blu-ray, DVD and digital download on October 18, 2016, by Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment.[25][26] It debuted at No. 2 in the Blu-ray Disc sales charts.[27]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass grossed $77 million in the United States and Canada and $222.4 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $299.5 million, against a budget of $170 million.[1]

North America[edit]

Alice Through the Looking Glass opened in the United States and Canada on May 27, 2016, alongside X-Men: Apocalypse, and was initially projected to gross $55–60 million from 3,763 theaters over its four-day Memorial Day opening weekend, but projections were continuously revised downwards due to poor word of mouth.[28] It had the added benefit of playing in over 3,100 3D theaters, 380 IMAX screens, 77 premium large formats and 79 D-box locations.[29][30] It made $1.5 million from Thursday previews (to the first film’s $3.9 million)[31] and just $9.7 million on its first day, compared to the $41 million opening Friday of its predecessor.[32] Through its opening weekend, it earned $27 million, which when compared to its predecessor’s $116 million opening is down 70%.[28] While 3D represented 71% ($82 million) of the original film’s opening gross, 3D constituted only 41% ($11 million) for this sequel, with 29% coming from traditional 3D shows, 11% from IMAX, and 1% from premium large formats.[33] It became the studio’s third Memorial Day opening flop following Tomorrowland in 2015 and Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time in 2010.[33] During its first week, the film grossed $40.1 million.[34] In its second weekend, the film grossed $11.3 million (a 55.1% drop), finishing 4th at the box office.[35]

Other countries[edit]

The film was released across 43 countries (72% of its total market place) the same weekend as the US, and was estimated to gross $80–100 million in its opening weekend. It faced competition from Warcraft and X-Men: Apocalypse.[36] It ended up grossing $62.7 million, which is well below the projections of which $4.1 million came from IMAX shows.[37] It had an opening weekend gross in Mexico ($4.5 million), Brazil ($4.1 million), and Russia ($3.9 million).[37] In the United Kingdom and Ireland, it had an unsuccessful opening by grossing just £2.23 million ($3.1 million) during its opening weekend, a mere 21% of the first film’s £10.56 million ($15.2 million) opening from 603 theaters. It debuted in second place behind X-Men: Apocalypse which was on its second weekend of play.[38] In China, it had an opening day of an estimated $7.3 million[39] and went on to score the second biggest Disney live-action (non-Marvel or Lucasfilm) opening ever with $26.6 million, behind only The Jungle Book.[37] However, this was down from its $35–45 million projections.[40] It debuted at the No. 1 spot among newly released film in Japan with $5.2 million and $4.1 million on Saturday and Sunday. By comparison, the first film opened with $14 million on its way to a $133.6 million a total.[41][42]

Critical response[edit]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 29% based on 234 reviews, and an average rating of 4.6/10. The site’s critical consensus reads, “Alice Through the Looking Glass is just as visually impressive as its predecessor, but that isn’t enough to cover for an underwhelming story that fails to live up to its classic characters.”[43] On Metacritic, the film has a score of 34 out of 100 based on 42 critics, indicating “generally unfavorable reviews”.[44] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of “A–” on an A+ to F scale, the same grade earned by its predecessor.[45]

Stephen Holden of The New York Times wrote in his review, “What does all this have to do with Lewis Carroll? Hardly anything” and that overall, “It’s just an excuse on which to hang two trite overbearing fables and one amusing one”.[46] Ty Burr of The Boston Globe gave the movie 1.5 out of 4 stars and called the film, “gaudy, loud, complacent, and vulgar.”[47]Stephen Whitty of New York Daily News called the film “hugely expensive and extravagantly stupid” and that, overall, the movie “is just one more silly Hollywood mashup, an innocent fantasy morphed into a noisy would-be blockbuster”.[48]

Matt Zoller Seitz of RogerEbert.com was deeply critical of Through the Looking Glass, describing it as “the most offensive kind of film…one that spends an enormous amount of money yet seems to have nothing on its mind but money. You give it, they take it. And you get nothing in return but assurances that you’re seeing magic and wonder. The movie keeps repeating it in your ear, and flashing it onscreen in big block letters: MAGIC AND WONDER. MAGIC AND WONDER. But there is no magic, no wonder, just junk rehashed from a movie that was itself a rehash of Lewis Carroll, tricked out with physically unpersuasive characters and landscapes and ‘action scenes’, with blockbuster ‘journey movie’ tropes affixed to every set-piece as blatantly as Post-It Notes.”[49]

Kyle Smith of New York Post gave the film a positive review: “The screenplay (by Linda Woolverton) isn’t exactly heaving with brilliant ideas, but it works well enough as a blank canvas against which the special-effects team goes bonkers”.[50] Matthew Lickona of San Diego Reader said that while he found the visual effects to be “stupidly expensive” and the story familiar, he called it, “a solid kids’ movie in the old style”.[51]

Accolades[edit]

List of awards and nominations
Award Category Recipient(s) Result Ref(s)
Golden Raspberry Awards Worst Prequel, Remake, Rip-off or Sequel Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [52]
Worst Supporting Actor Johnny Depp
Worst Screen Combo Johnny Depp and His Vomitously Vibrant Costume
Golden Trailer Awards Best Animation Family “Poem” [53]
The Don LaFontaine Award for Best Voice Over “Poem”
Best Fantasy Adventure TV Spot “Grammys”
Best Original Score TV Spot “Grammys”
Grammy Awards Best Song Written For Visual Media Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max MartinPink and Shellback [54]
Hollywood Music in Media Awards Best Song – Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film “Just Like Fire” – Oscar Holter, Max Martin, Pink and Shellback Won [55][56]
People’s Choice Awards Favorite Family Movie Alice Through the Looking Glass Nominated [57]
Satellite Awards Best Art Direction and Production Design Dan Hennah [58]
Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood
Saturn Awards Best Costume Design Colleen Atwood [59]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Music: Song from a Movie or TV Show “Just Like Fire” by Pink [60]
Visual Effects Society Awards Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature

 

Here’s who won big at Sunday night’s 90th Academy Awards.

Actress:

Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (WINNER)
Sally Hawkins, “The Shape of Water”
Margot Robbie, “I, Tonya”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Meryl Streep, “The Post”

Actor:

Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour” (WINNER)
Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”
Daniel Day-Lewis, “Phantom Thread”
Daniel Kaluuya, “Get Out”
Denzel Washington, “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Director:

“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro (WINNER)
“Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan
“Get Out,” Jordan Peele
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“Phantom Thread,” Paul Thomas Anderson

Original Song:

“Remember Me” from “Coco,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez (WINNER)
“Mighty River” from “Mudbound,” Mary J. Blige
“Mystery of Love” from “Call Me by Your Name,” Sufjan Stevens
“Stand Up for Something” from “Marshall,” Diane Warren, Common
“This Is Me” from “The Greatest Showman,” Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

Original Score:

“The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat (WINNER)
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” John Williams (saw)
“Dunkirk,” Hans Zimmer
“Phantom Thread,” Jonny Greenwood
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Carter Burwell

Cinematography:

“Blade Runner 2049,” Roger Deakins (WINNER) (saw)
“Darkest Hour,” Bruno Delbonnel
“Dunkirk,” Hoyte van Hoytema
“Mudbound,” Rachel Morrison
“The Shape of Water,” Dan Laustsen

Original Screenplay:

“Get Out,” Jordan Peele (WINNER)
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Martin McDonagh
“The Big Sick,” Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani
“Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig
“The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor

Adapted Screenplay:

“Call Me by Your Name,” James Ivory (WINNER)
“The Disaster Artist,” Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber
“Logan,” Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green
“Molly’s Game,” Aaron Sorkin
“Mudbound,” Virgil Williams and Dee Rees

Live Action Short Film:

“The Silent Child,” Chris Overton, Rachel Shenton (WINNER)
“DeKalb Elementary,” Reed Van Dyk
“The Eleven O’Clock,” Derin Seale, Josh Lawson
“My Nephew Emmett,” Kevin Wilson, Jr.
“Watu Wote/All of Us,” Katja Benrath, Tobias Rosen

Documentary Short Subject:

“Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405,” Frank Stiefel (WINNER)
“Heroin(e),” Elaine McMillion Sheldon, Kerrin Sheldon
“Edith+Eddie,” Laura Checkoway, Thomas Lee Wright
“Knife Skills,” Thomas Lennon
“Traffic Stop,” Kate Davis, David Heilbroner

Sound Editing:

“Dunkirk,” Alex Gibson, Richard King (WINNER)
“Baby Driver,” Julian Slater  saw
“Blade Runner 2049,” Mark Mangini, Theo Green
“The Shape of Water,” Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Ren Klyce, Matthew Wood

Sound Mixing:

“Dunkirk,” Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo (WINNER)
“Baby Driver,” Mary H. Ellis, Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin
“Blade Runner 2049,” Mac Ruth, Ron Bartlett, Doug Hephill
“The Shape of Water,” Glen Gauthier, Christian Cooke, Brad Zoern
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Stuart Wilson, Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick

Documentary Feature:

“Icarus,” Bryan Fogel, Dan Cogan (WINNER)
“Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” Steve James, Mark Mitten, Julie Goldman
“Faces Places,” JR, Agnès Varda, Rosalie Varda
“Last Men in Aleppo,” Feras Fayyad, Kareem Abeed, Soren Steen Jepersen
“Strong Island,” Yance Ford, Joslyn Barnes

Costume Design:

“Phantom Thread,” Mark Bridges (WINNER)
“Beauty and the Beast,” Jacqueline Durran
“Darkest Hour,” Jacqueline Durran
“The Shape of Water,” Luis Sequeira
“Victoria and Abdul,” Consolata Boyle

Makeup and Hairstyling:

“Darkest Hour,” Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick (WINNER)
“Victoria and Abdul,” Daniel Phillips and Lou Sheppard
“Wonder,” Arjen Tuiten

Foreign Language Film:

“A Fantastic Woman” (Chile) (WINNER)
“The Insult” (Lebanon)
“Loveless” (Russia)
“On Body and Soul (Hungary)
“The Square” (Sweden)

Production Design:

“The Shape of Water,” Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, Shane Vieau (WINNER)
“Beauty and the Beast,” Sarah Greenwood; Katie Spencer
“Blade Runner 2049,” Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola
“Darkest Hour,” Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
“Dunkirk,” Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis

Supporting Actor:

Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (WINNER)
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Woody Harrelson, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”
Richard Jenkins, “The Shape of Water”
Christopher Plummer, “All the Money in the World”

Supporting Actress:

Allison Janney, “I, Tonya” (WINNER)
Mary J. Blige, “Mudbound”
Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”
Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird”
Octavia Spencer, “The Shape of Water”

Best Picture:

“Call Me by Your Name”
√“Darkest Hour”
√ “Dunkirk”
√ “Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water” (WINNER)
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

 

 

√ “Get Out”
“Lady Bird”
“Phantom Thread”
“The Post”
“The Shape of Water” (WINNER)
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

 

 

 

Movie Watching List vr 2 (Repaired)

Movie Watching Journal 2015 v4

movie Journal 2017 Part One v3 docxMovie Watching Journal 2016 part four v2